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  • FIRST POST
    • inspector monkfish
    • By inspector monkfish 20th Jul 19, 8:54 PM
    • 9,202Posts
    • 10,684Thanks
    inspector monkfish
    Zoom Lens for Nikon d3500 dslr advice please...
    • #1
    • 20th Jul 19, 8:54 PM
    Zoom Lens for Nikon d3500 dslr advice please... 20th Jul 19 at 8:54 PM
    hello, just looking for advice please for my daughter, as we know nothing about photography and itís all a bit minefield out there to us, sorry!

    Our daughter is 15yrs old and just getting into photography.

    We have recently bought her a Nikon D3500 dslr camera as advised by the photography course she has started.

    it came with a standard type lens, which is fine, but she now needs a zoom lens for the next part of the course sheís taking.

    We've been advised to get a 70-300mm zoom lens, but itís hard (for us anyway) to understand what is compatible with her camera and why the prices seem to vary from anywhere between £80 and £500!

    some seem to be different brand, but compatible with Nikon. Some seem to be actual Nikon brand, not really sure how this all works to be completely honest!

    Dont really have the money to splash out on the top end lens, but equally donít want to buy something cheap and not up to the job!

    Any helpful advice please would be humbly appreciated to these completely novice parents, who are willing to learn!

    Thank-you in advance
    IM
    Please take the time to have a look around my Daughter's website www.daisypalmertrust.co.uk
    (MSE Andrea says ok!)
Page 1
    • flashg67
    • By flashg67 20th Jul 19, 11:00 PM
    • 2,821 Posts
    • 1,866 Thanks
    flashg67
    • #2
    • 20th Jul 19, 11:00 PM
    • #2
    • 20th Jul 19, 11:00 PM
    This is something I'm at the beginning of looking at for my OH. I gather that like most things, there are branded & aftermarket parts available, and within that, different qualities available.
    Probably something worth speaking to a 'proper' camera shop about. My target price for a similar lens is £150 to £200, being about 50% of the original camera price.
    • tberry6686
    • By tberry6686 21st Jul 19, 12:19 AM
    • 1,040 Posts
    • 995 Thanks
    tberry6686
    • #3
    • 21st Jul 19, 12:19 AM
    • #3
    • 21st Jul 19, 12:19 AM
    Looks like the camera uses the Nikon F mount with AF so anything with that mount should be fine.

    The three most popular lens manufacturers (for that mount) are Nikon, Sigma and Tamron. All are pretty good but Sigma and Tamron are likely to be significantly cheaper than Nikon.

    I mainly use a mixture of Sigma and Tamron lenses on my cameras (Sony) and have no complaints about the quality of the lenses or the images they produce.
    Last edited by tberry6686; 21-07-2019 at 12:22 AM. Reason: added a bit
    • trojan10_om
    • By trojan10_om 21st Jul 19, 5:31 AM
    • 63 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    trojan10_om
    • #4
    • 21st Jul 19, 5:31 AM
    • #4
    • 21st Jul 19, 5:31 AM
    The more expensive lens will likely have better performance in low light, faster focusing, and greater depth of field (to give the blurred background effect).

    One thing to bare in mind is that if she takes up photography seriously/professionally she’ll almost certainly require a new camera (full frame) and the lenses won’t be compatible and she (you!) will be shopping from scratch again.

    Therefore I’d seriously consider buying used from eBay, because at least you don’t loose too much value when she either upgrades or gives up on it.
    • Colin_Maybe
    • By Colin_Maybe 21st Jul 19, 9:02 AM
    • 4,418 Posts
    • 2,561 Thanks
    Colin_Maybe
    • #5
    • 21st Jul 19, 9:02 AM
    • #5
    • 21st Jul 19, 9:02 AM
    The more expensive lens will likely have better performance in low light, faster focusing, and greater depth of field (to give the blurred background effect).

    One thing to bare in mind is that if she takes up photography seriously/professionally she’ll almost certainly require a new camera (full frame) and the lenses won’t be compatible and she (you!) will be shopping from scratch again.

    Therefore I’d seriously consider buying used from eBay, because at least you don’t loose too much value when she either upgrades or gives up on it.
    Originally posted by trojan10_om
    The Nikon D3500 uses the Nikon F mount and therefore uses the exact same lenses as the top of the line Nikon cameras. She won't have to replace the lenses at all (except for quality reasons).

    Edit: with the caveat that the lenses are full frame lenses of course.
    Last edited by Colin_Maybe; 21-07-2019 at 9:09 AM.
    • Colin_Maybe
    • By Colin_Maybe 21st Jul 19, 9:07 AM
    • 4,418 Posts
    • 2,561 Thanks
    Colin_Maybe
    • #6
    • 21st Jul 19, 9:07 AM
    • #6
    • 21st Jul 19, 9:07 AM
    hello, just looking for advice please for my daughter, as we know nothing about photography and itís all a bit minefield out there to us, sorry!

    Our daughter is 15yrs old and just getting into photography.

    We have recently bought her a Nikon D3500 dslr camera as advised by the photography course she has started.

    it came with a standard type lens, which is fine, but she now needs a zoom lens for the next part of the course sheís taking.

    We've been advised to get a 70-300mm zoom lens, but itís hard (for us anyway) to understand what is compatible with her camera and why the prices seem to vary from anywhere between £80 and £500!

    some seem to be different brand, but compatible with Nikon. Some seem to be actual Nikon brand, not really sure how this all works to be completely honest!

    Dont really have the money to splash out on the top end lens, but equally donít want to buy something cheap and not up to the job!

    Any helpful advice please would be humbly appreciated to these completely novice parents, who are willing to learn!

    Thank-you in advance
    IM
    Originally posted by inspector monkfish
    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/buying-guides/best-telephoto-lenses-for-nikon-in-2018#section-best-70-300mm-lens

    This has a decent selection split between the best 70-300mm and the best budget 70-300mm.

    As said above you have to balance between price/quality/performance, read all of the reviews and speak to your daughter to see which is most important to her and the course.
    • neilmcl
    • By neilmcl 21st Jul 19, 9:20 AM
    • 13,225 Posts
    • 9,870 Thanks
    neilmcl
    • #7
    • 21st Jul 19, 9:20 AM
    • #7
    • 21st Jul 19, 9:20 AM
    https://www.techradar.com/uk/news/best-nikon-lens
    • PhylPho
    • By PhylPho 21st Jul 19, 9:47 AM
    • 1,338 Posts
    • 2,874 Thanks
    PhylPho
    • #8
    • 21st Jul 19, 9:47 AM
    • #8
    • 21st Jul 19, 9:47 AM
    hello, just looking for advice please for my daughter, as we know nothing about photography and itís all a bit minefield out there to us, sorry!

    Our daughter is 15yrs old and just getting into photography.

    We have recently bought her a Nikon D3500 dslr camera as advised by the photography course she has started.

    it came with a standard type lens, which is fine, but she now needs a zoom lens for the next part of the course sheís taking.

    We've been advised to get a 70-300mm zoom lens, but itís hard (for us anyway) to understand what is compatible with her camera and why the prices seem to vary from anywhere between £80 and £500!

    some seem to be different brand, but compatible with Nikon. Some seem to be actual Nikon brand, not really sure how this all works to be completely honest!

    Dont really have the money to splash out on the top end lens, but equally donít want to buy something cheap and not up to the job!

    Any helpful advice please would be humbly appreciated to these completely novice parents, who are willing to learn!

    Thank-you in advance
    IM
    Originally posted by inspector monkfish
    As a parent myself, you have mny sympathies. However, as a hobbyist photographer since the days of my first Russian-made Zenit 35mm camera, I'm bound in all honesty to say that a 15 year old getting into photography really doesn't need Nikon equipment to do so -- it's complete overkill, as are the prices likely to be encountered.

    That's because, to use your phrase, "top end lenses' and 'top end equipment' is directed to 'top end users', i.e. people who know how to get the best from that which they've so expensively acquired.

    Having come across this kind of nonsense time and again with local authority-run so-called 'education programmes' (though hopefully, what's being referred to here isn't such a scheme) it's blindingly obvious that those running such programmes / schemes haven't a clue what they're doing, and shouldn't be taken the slightest notice of.

    Telling a complete novice they need to have a Nikon dSLR regardless of the fact that they know nothing about photography is like telling a would-be artist that they need to buy the Sistine Chapel in order to learn how to paint. It's blatant stupity.

    You'd be much better advised NOT to waste any further time looking at grey market prices / Nikon UK prices and instead buy your daughter a decent bridge camera, either new or refurbished -- Panasonic's excellent FZ1000 and successor comes to mind -- as it's this type of camera which actually stimulates a user into taking more and more pictures . . . and getting rewarding results which will encourage them to do more, learn more, and enjoy more. A massively expensive dSLR kit will likely achieve the exact opposite where a novice user is concerned.

    As to learning the art and practice of photography, a thorough reading of a bridge camer's user manual (so as to become familiarised with 'manual' shooting) and membership of an online bridge camera user forum will be of considerably greater help, at considerably less expense, than chucking £100s at Nikon lenses that are neither needed nor justified.

    Put your money away. The advice you're being given is absurd.

    PS: online reviews of 'bridge cameras' are easy to locate via a simple search enquiry. Such reviews are informative, but should not be regarded as Gospel because the entire online reviewing 'industry' is poisoned by the sheer number of free samples and free trips handed out to so-called 'reviewers' by manufacturers of all shapes and sizes. Though Amazon's 'Vine' programme took plenty of stick for being 'corrupt', it at least was honest enough to be visible.
    • PhylPho
    • By PhylPho 21st Jul 19, 10:02 AM
    • 1,338 Posts
    • 2,874 Thanks
    PhylPho
    • #9
    • 21st Jul 19, 10:02 AM
    • #9
    • 21st Jul 19, 10:02 AM
    PS: just to add to my earlier post, think long and think hard about whether you want to tie up your funds in dSLR equipment at a time when so many dSLR users are giving up on the folly of lugging all that stuff around with them. Portability and manoeuverability are, along with actual ability, the three defining qualities to be looked for in photographic equipment. Unfortunately, once you start down the road of acquiring expensive extra lenses for a camera that was never that portable (nor remotely pocketable) in the first place you're on a mission to nowhere: there are actually mobile phones and tablets out there already which can take as good a photograph as a Nikon dSLR in optimal light situations. (I'm speaking from experience, comparing the results from my 2017 iPad Pro with my now no longer used Nikon 5200.)

    As cellphone photography increasingly replaces traditional photography, it's wise to stay on the right side of things, and not finish up with a massively devalued dSLR kit that no-one really wants when their phone or their tablet is already working just fine, thanks.

    At the moment, zoom cameras are doing that which no phone or tablet can adequately match. Though I'm yet to achieve with my highly pocketable go anywhere Canon SX740 HS an exhibition print capable of occupying several square feet of wall space -- but then, I'm not expecting to -- I'm enjoying the capturing of images at zoom lengths no mobile phone can possibly manage.
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 21st Jul 19, 10:15 AM
    • 1,433 Posts
    • 2,357 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    greater depth of field (to give the blurred background effect).
    Originally posted by trojan10_om
    That's wrong!
    • jbainbridge
    • By jbainbridge 21st Jul 19, 11:03 AM
    • 1,848 Posts
    • 1,202 Thanks
    jbainbridge
    There's a lot to be said for buying cameras and lens on eBay. Many people buy all the gear but find it too unwieldy to carry round .. much of it never gets used!!
    • photodgm
    • By photodgm 21st Jul 19, 11:14 AM
    • 199 Posts
    • 58 Thanks
    photodgm
    I don't know the requirements of her course, but since you have started down the dslr route I think the best 70-300 lens would be the Nikon AF-P 70-300 f4.5-6.3 G ED VR DX lens. It is auto focus, has vibration reduction and is DX which means it is designed for the sensor size of your daughter's camera. It is not the cheapest option. I would be happy to buy 2nd hand but personally I would be wary of ebay for a 2nd hand lens.
    • Kentish Dave
    • By Kentish Dave 21st Jul 19, 11:16 AM
    • 721 Posts
    • 1,270 Thanks
    Kentish Dave
    The Nikon D3500 uses the Nikon F mount and therefore uses the exact same lenses as the top of the line Nikon cameras. She won't have to replace the lenses at all (except for quality reasons).

    Edit: with the caveat that the lenses are full frame lenses of course.
    Originally posted by Colin_Maybe
    And for the OP, that caveat is important. The DX camera has a smaller sensor (physical size) than so-called full-frame cameras and the lenses that you will likely be looking at produce an image on the sensor that covers all of your sensor, but not all of the sensor on a full-frame camera.

    Iíve recently bought a full-frame Nikon (DF) and although my DX lenses work with it they are. It ideal, as the camera can only use the central part of the sensor.

    Itís worth finding out if a full-frame camera is in the plans, and if so going with full-frame lenses now.
    • inspector monkfish
    • By inspector monkfish 21st Jul 19, 11:35 AM
    • 9,202 Posts
    • 10,684 Thanks
    inspector monkfish
    Thank-you for all your helpful comments, all very much appreciated. Seems we have a lot of long and hard thinking to do!
    Please take the time to have a look around my Daughter's website www.daisypalmertrust.co.uk
    (MSE Andrea says ok!)
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 21st Jul 19, 12:01 PM
    • 1,433 Posts
    • 2,357 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    The advice you're being given is absurd.
    Originally posted by PhylPho
    And top of the list is the tripe you wrote. I suspect you have a massive chip on your anorak about Nikon because it's out of your price range even the basic stuff.

    The FZ1000 you allude to is a brick with crappy battery life, a pokey small viewfinder, nasty variable aperture with a min of.....f8 FFS! It's also much more expensive than the Nikon.

    I learnt most of my basic photography on a s/h F3hp md4. The Nikon will be fine it also benefits from the F mount so 100's of top quality s/h lens.
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 21st Jul 19, 12:10 PM
    • 2,576 Posts
    • 1,722 Thanks
    Johnmcl7

    You'd be much better advised NOT to waste any further time looking at grey market prices / Nikon UK prices and instead buy your daughter a decent bridge camera, either new or refurbished -- Panasonic's excellent FZ1000 and successor comes to mind -- as it's this type of camera which actually stimulates a user into taking more and more pictures . . . and getting rewarding results which will encourage them to do more, learn more, and enjoy more. A massively expensive dSLR kit will likely achieve the exact opposite where a novice user is concerned.
    Originally posted by PhylPho
    I strongly disagree, I own several 1in sensor cameras (RX100mk1, RX100MkIV, RX10mk2 and a Mavic Pro 2) and while they offer a great balance between size and image quality they're a poor choice for learning photography. The smaller sensor with a fixed zoom lens means you have almost no DoF control, the larger APS-C sensor has two stops less DoF at any aperture and as it's not fixed you can put a cheap 35mm F1.8 on there to give a low light or shallow depth of field option.

    The APS-C sensor also has a lot more latitude for editing in post processing particularly for dynamic range and much cleaner at high iso as well.

    The FZ1000 is a great all in one camera for convenience but it's a terrible camera to learn photography on particularly when the OP has already bought the DSLR.
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 21st Jul 19, 12:22 PM
    • 2,576 Posts
    • 1,722 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    Thank-you for all your helpful comments, all very much appreciated. Seems we have a lot of long and hard thinking to do!
    Originally posted by inspector monkfish
    For a 70-300mm range I'd say it comes down to these two:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Nikon-JAA829DA-4-5-6-3G-ED-VR/dp/B01KJ8UMKK/ref=pd_sbs_421_1/261-0717934-1105840?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01KJ8UMKK&pd_rd_r= 6b4018bd-0f5c-4e42-8623-2d3188d18d1d&pd_rd_w=dj9SU&pd_rd_wg=cZpkk&pf_rd_p= 18edf98b-139a-41ee-bb40-d725dd59d1d3&pf_rd_r=9VZ2TSGHAFK4JCEENSPX&psc=1&re fRID=9VZ2TSGHAFK4JCEENSPX

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tamron-70-300-4-5-6-Lens-Nikon/dp/B003YUBTIA/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=tamron+70-300mm&qid=1563711305&s=electronics&sr=1-4

    It's a good range on top of a standard zoom lens and a reasonable price, you'll see from the comparison link someone else posted that while you could get further or faster the prices go up quickly.

    Make sure any lens you're looking at has image stabilisation, Nikon called VR (Vibration Reduction) while Tamron call it VC (Vibration Compensation). For lenses of this focal length it's extremely useful and makes it practical to use the lenses handheld, without any stabilisation especially in the often grey British weather it's often difficult to use such a lens handheld.
    • Colin_Maybe
    • By Colin_Maybe 21st Jul 19, 12:43 PM
    • 4,418 Posts
    • 2,561 Thanks
    Colin_Maybe
    And for the OP, that caveat is important. The DX camera has a smaller sensor (physical size) than so-called full-frame cameras and the lenses that you will likely be looking at produce an image on the sensor that covers all of your sensor, but not all of the sensor on a full-frame camera.

    Iíve recently bought a full-frame Nikon (DF) and although my DX lenses work with it they are. It ideal, as the camera can only use the central part of the sensor.

    Itís worth finding out if a full-frame camera is in the plans, and if so going with full-frame lenses now.
    Originally posted by Kentish Dave
    Yes it is. I added the edit as it's been awhile since I looked at cameras and lenses and I remembered after the fact that Canon at least used to do a really rubbish cheap kit lens that wasn't full frame.
    • Colin_Maybe
    • By Colin_Maybe 21st Jul 19, 12:47 PM
    • 4,418 Posts
    • 2,561 Thanks
    Colin_Maybe
    As a parent myself, you have mny sympathies. However, as a hobbyist photographer since the days of my first Russian-made Zenit 35mm camera, I'm bound in all honesty to say that a 15 year old getting into photography really doesn't need Nikon equipment to do so -- it's complete overkill, as are the prices likely to be encountered.

    That's because, to use your phrase, "top end lenses' and 'top end equipment' is directed to 'top end users', i.e. people who know how to get the best from that which they've so expensively acquired.

    Having come across this kind of nonsense time and again with local authority-run so-called 'education programmes' (though hopefully, what's being referred to here isn't such a scheme) it's blindingly obvious that those running such programmes / schemes haven't a clue what they're doing, and shouldn't be taken the slightest notice of.

    Telling a complete novice they need to have a Nikon dSLR regardless of the fact that they know nothing about photography is like telling a would-be artist that they need to buy the Sistine Chapel in order to learn how to paint. It's blatant stupity.

    You'd be much better advised NOT to waste any further time looking at grey market prices / Nikon UK prices and instead buy your daughter a decent bridge camera, either new or refurbished -- Panasonic's excellent FZ1000 and successor comes to mind -- as it's this type of camera which actually stimulates a user into taking more and more pictures . . . and getting rewarding results which will encourage them to do more, learn more, and enjoy more. A massively expensive dSLR kit will likely achieve the exact opposite where a novice user is concerned.

    As to learning the art and practice of photography, a thorough reading of a bridge camer's user manual (so as to become familiarised with 'manual' shooting) and membership of an online bridge camera user forum will be of considerably greater help, at considerably less expense, than chucking £100s at Nikon lenses that are neither needed nor justified.

    Put your money away. The advice you're being given is absurd.

    PS: online reviews of 'bridge cameras' are easy to locate via a simple search enquiry. Such reviews are informative, but should not be regarded as Gospel because the entire online reviewing 'industry' is poisoned by the sheer number of free samples and free trips handed out to so-called 'reviewers' by manufacturers of all shapes and sizes. Though Amazon's 'Vine' programme took plenty of stick for being 'corrupt', it at least was honest enough to be visible.
    Originally posted by PhylPho
    Considering they've already invested around £300 in the D3500 plus whichever lens it came with, I can't see the sense in advising them to junk it and start all over again with a (probably) lower quality and very much more limited bridge camera.

    Perhaps his daughter has a love for photography that can blossom into a lifelong hobby or even career?
    • shopbot
    • By shopbot 21st Jul 19, 6:26 PM
    • 1,007 Posts
    • 413 Thanks
    shopbot
    Looks like the camera uses the Nikon F mount with AF so anything with that mount should be fine.
    Originally posted by tberry6686
    The following sentence should read "If you are happy to manually focus'"

    The D3500 does not have a focussing motor and relies on lens models with a motor instead.

    All F mount lenses will fit but only some will autofocus.

    https://www.nikonimgsupport.com/eu/BV_article?articleNo=000035704&configured=1&lang=e n_GB

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