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  • FIRST POST
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 23rd Mar 17, 2:33 PM
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    andrewf75
    need new commuter bike
    • #1
    • 23rd Mar 17, 2:33 PM
    need new commuter bike 23rd Mar 17 at 2:33 PM
    I need a new commuting bike. Currently have a Ridgeback hybrid 21 speed that I have basically trashed by not maintaining it. I donít have a long commute and not too hilly so should I be looking at fixed gear or enclosed hub bikes as these are more resistant to neglect? I just saw a Bobbin Noodle in a shop which got me thinking. Not looking to spend too much - around 300 ideally but would consider spending more if it will last longer.

    Thanks!
Page 1
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 23rd Mar 17, 2:50 PM
    • 7,603 Posts
    • 4,840 Thanks
    Nasqueron
    • #2
    • 23rd Mar 17, 2:50 PM
    • #2
    • 23rd Mar 17, 2:50 PM
    Fixie (or a single speed) is fine for flat and light hills if you don't have any plans to move jobs and end up in a hilly area!

    Neglect is easy to avoid though, weekly bike clean takes a few minutes, wipe off the chain and do a proper chain clean every so often

    Don't discount a normal road bike, the B'Twin range from Decathlon and Pinnacle from Evans (both own brand bikes) give good value for money

    http://road.cc/content/buyers-guide/217632-13-best-road-bike-bargains-under-%C2%A3500

    Evans also have a few ex-demo hybrids under £300 with minimal damage which could be a bargain given the savings

    https://www.evanscycles.com/bikes/hybrid-bikes_c/soiled?sort=price_inc_vat
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 23rd Mar 17, 5:39 PM
    • 2,477 Posts
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    parking_question_chap
    • #3
    • 23rd Mar 17, 5:39 PM
    • #3
    • 23rd Mar 17, 5:39 PM
    I would got for a second hand alu frame hybrid. I got one for about £120 and its doing just fine.

    Hubs are great in that they are protected and have a lovely smooth gear change in my experience, but if they go wrong its pretty hard to fix yourself.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 24th Mar 17, 2:41 AM
    • 9,076 Posts
    • 7,134 Thanks
    esuhl
    • #4
    • 24th Mar 17, 2:41 AM
    • #4
    • 24th Mar 17, 2:41 AM
    I need a new commuting bike. Currently have a Ridgeback hybrid 21 speed that I have basically trashed by not maintaining it. ...
    Not looking to spend too much - around 300 ideally but would consider spending more if it will last longer.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    It looks like your current bike retails for around that price. :-/

    How trashed is the bike? Replacing the chain, chainrings, rear cassette, and brake/gear cables could transform your bike into a new one. If the gears are out of alignment, a new rear hanger (~£10) might do the job.

    Depending what's knackered it might (or might not) be cheaper to replace the stuff yourself. Also, that way, you'll have a lot of the tools and knowledge you need to keep the bike maintained.

    Bike maintenance is actually a lot easier than you might think. There are so many guides on YouTube too.

    Neglect is easy to avoid though, weekly bike clean takes a few minutes, wipe off the chain and do a proper chain clean every so often
    Originally posted by Nasqueron
    Yep. Also, once you've got your head round how to adjust the brakes and gears, it gets so much quicker and easier each time you do it.

    One trick I've found to keep the chain running smoothly is to use wax instead of oil on the chain. You need to degrease the chain first, and reapply the wax more regularly than oil. But, since the wax isn't "sticky" like oil, as it attracts grit it falls off the chain, instead of forming a thick sticky gunk. Since most of the wax falls off, you never need to degrease the chain again. Just wipe off the grit, and reapply the wax.

    This is what I use if anyone's interested. It's brilliant:
    http://www.squirtlube.com/
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 24th Mar 17, 9:42 AM
    • 8,853 Posts
    • 7,769 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #5
    • 24th Mar 17, 9:42 AM
    • #5
    • 24th Mar 17, 9:42 AM
    Currently have a Ridgeback hybrid 21 speed that I have basically trashed by not maintaining it.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    Define "trashed". Brakes and gears not working properly? Ask a local bike shop to quote to service or repair this bike. If the repairs sound expensive to you they may part exchange it for another bike.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 24th Mar 17, 9:56 AM
    • 9,804 Posts
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    andrewf75
    • #6
    • 24th Mar 17, 9:56 AM
    • #6
    • 24th Mar 17, 9:56 AM
    Define "trashed". Brakes and gears not working properly? Ask a local bike shop to quote to service or repair this bike. If the repairs sound expensive to you they may part exchange it for another bike.
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    repairs of nearly £200 to replace various parts so effectively not worth doing IMO.

    I know bike maintenance is not that hard, but I don't have the time or inclination. If I buy a new one I will make a bit more effort though!

    Thanks all. Think I might be looking at something similar to what I have. Will have a look at Decathlon if they are recommended.
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 24th Mar 17, 1:01 PM
    • 7,603 Posts
    • 4,840 Thanks
    Nasqueron
    • #7
    • 24th Mar 17, 1:01 PM
    • #7
    • 24th Mar 17, 1:01 PM
    repairs of nearly £200 to replace various parts so effectively not worth doing IMO.

    I know bike maintenance is not that hard, but I don't have the time or inclination. If I buy a new one I will make a bit more effort though!

    Thanks all. Think I might be looking at something similar to what I have. Will have a look at Decathlon if they are recommended.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    It's literally a matter of getting some cleaning fluid (muc off if you can afford it else poundland do their own version - same pinkish colour), spray on, wait a couple of minutes, wash off and dry. Run the pedals backwards (bike right way up) or (forwards bike upside down on a cloth) use some kitchen towel to remove any major grit. Job done for next week.

    Only need major stuff like a bike service once a year if you aren't confident
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 24th Mar 17, 4:02 PM
    • 9,804 Posts
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    andrewf75
    • #8
    • 24th Mar 17, 4:02 PM
    • #8
    • 24th Mar 17, 4:02 PM
    This will be my resolution on my next bike!
    • martinthebandit
    • By martinthebandit 24th Mar 17, 4:10 PM
    • 4,136 Posts
    • 7,426 Thanks
    martinthebandit
    • #9
    • 24th Mar 17, 4:10 PM
    • #9
    • 24th Mar 17, 4:10 PM
    repairs of nearly £200 to replace various parts so effectively not worth doing IMO.

    I know bike maintenance is not that hard, but I don't have the time or inclination. If I buy a new one I will make a bit more effort though!

    Thanks all. Think I might be looking at something similar to what I have. Will have a look at Decathlon if they are recommended.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    So rather than spend £200 (probably less if you diy) on your current bike you want to spend £300 on a new one?

    You do know this is supposed to be a money saving site don't you?

    If you don't find joy in the snow,
    remember you'll have less joy in your life


    ...but still have the same amount of snow!
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 25th Mar 17, 2:30 AM
    • 2,607 Posts
    • 1,734 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    Is the £200 a quote you've actually got for the bike and if so, what does that break down to? I'll admit I'm pretty lazy and tend to get the bike shop to do some of the work on my bikes but £200 seems unusually high. I pretty much destroyed a much more expensive MTB on a 24 hour ride (this was one shot during the night - https://photos.smugmug.com/Events/Velocity-Cafe-Bike-Runs/i-Wz8q2kC/0/L/DSC03130-L.jpg) and the total price to strip the entire bike down and clean it plus replace the chain, the cassette and bottom bracket was less than £200 and those are more expensive parts.

    John
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 25th Mar 17, 11:56 AM
    • 2,477 Posts
    • 2,802 Thanks
    parking_question_chap
    So rather than spend £200 (probably less if you diy) on your current bike you want to spend £300 on a new one?

    You do know this is supposed to be a money saving site don't you?
    Originally posted by martinthebandit
    Depends how you look at it.

    I dont think spending £200 on a fixing bike that probably cost £350 as money well spent.

    I would rather spend £300 and buy second hand and end up with a bike that probably cost £700 new.

    I dont mean its specifically about the price when new. But for a bike that cost £700 odd new, you will be getting an awful lot of kit. There is loads of choice in the second hand market.

    However if OP is only looking at new, then yes, it seems pretty silly not to fix his current bike.
    • fred246
    • By fred246 27th Mar 17, 6:38 AM
    • 1,910 Posts
    • 1,264 Thanks
    fred246
    £200 is obviously mainly a labour charge. It did get me thinking though. I service my own cars and bicycles. Servicing a car has never been simpler. No grease guns. No contact breaker points or carburetors to adjust. I insist on using the best parts I can get.
    For an interim service I need oil & filter plus a pollen filter. Costs £28. My local dealer wants over £230 for this service. A major service costs me £46 in parts. Local dealer wants over £290 for the service. MASSIVE labour charges.
    It takes me longer to CLEAN my bicycle than it does to service my car. Changing the oil and filter is simple, adjusting your gears to perfection is quite tricky. Checking my lights and horn is simple, truing a wheel is tricky.
    It seems that people are used to astronomical labour charges for car servicing but aren't used to it for bikes.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 27th Mar 17, 11:30 AM
    • 9,804 Posts
    • 17,313 Thanks
    andrewf75
    So rather than spend £200 (probably less if you diy) on your current bike you want to spend £300 on a new one?

    You do know this is supposed to be a money saving site don't you?
    Originally posted by martinthebandit

    I don't have the time or inclination to DIY.
    I don't *want* to spend that amount, but if for 50% more than fixing up my old bike I can get a new one, then that could easily be seen as better value for money in the long run surely?

    The shop I use has pretty low labour charges it was at least 100 in parts alone.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 15th Apr 17, 5:58 PM
    • 1,600 Posts
    • 1,141 Thanks
    dunroving
    The main concern I have with internal geared bikes is that if you get a flat and need to replace the tyre, getting the wheel off is a bit of a military manouevre. I can remove a rear wheel and replace a tyre in 5-10 minutes and no faff, if it's a derailleured set-up. I looked at a Youtube video on how to remove an Alfine 8-speed rear wheel and it looked way more complicated.
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 15th Apr 17, 9:31 PM
    • 7,218 Posts
    • 8,455 Thanks
    Keep pedalling
    The main concern I have with internal geared bikes is that if you get a flat and need to replace the tyre, getting the wheel off is a bit of a military manouevre. I can remove a rear wheel and replace a tyre in 5-10 minutes and no faff, if it's a derailleured set-up. I looked at a Youtube video on how to remove an Alfine 8-speed rear wheel and it looked way more complicated.
    Originally posted by dunroving
    My touring bike has a 14 speed Rohloff hub and it is not difficult to remove and refit. It does take slightly longer in that I have to release and reconnect the bayonet connection on the two gear change cables so that adds about 15 seconds to a tube change, that is more than offset by simple maintenance compared to front and rear derailleurs.
    • fred246
    • By fred246 15th Apr 17, 11:34 PM
    • 1,910 Posts
    • 1,264 Thanks
    fred246
    I wanted to love internal hub gears but ended up hating them. I started with a Nexus 7 and then had 2 Nexus 8s. They have the following advantage.
    You can change gears when stationary.
    They have the following disadvantages
    They weigh a ton. I had a marathon Plus tyre to avoid flats and the end result was a very heavy rear wheel.
    Each gear is different. I think 5 was direct so I loved 5 but hated 4 etc
    My chain had no tensioner so I had to check the tension daily. I stretched chains really quickly and was always replacing them.
    You always had to check cable tension - 2 marks had to line up.
    They broke very quickly. Fixing them was difficult and needed special tools.
    Maintenance oil was stupidly expensive.
    Replacing them needed wheel building skills which I have but people would pay a lot for a new hub and wheel build.
    Taking the wheel off was fast but putting it back on was awful lining up red triangles and yellow circles.
    I replaced it with a bike with Shimano Alivio/Deore gears which is much better in every way.
    Rohloffs are supposed to be super reliable but are still very heavy and everything about them is expensive.
    Last edited by fred246; 16-04-2017 at 8:08 AM. Reason: Mistake
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 16th Apr 17, 12:43 AM
    • 2,607 Posts
    • 1,734 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    My first bike had a Shimano Nexus 8 hub with a belt drive, the first hub was faulty but I had no issues with the second one despite riding it all year round. The belt needed occasionally checks but that was every few months rather than daily. I had a tough rear tyre on and thankfully never had any punctures.

    Weight I did find to be an issue as it made the bike feel heavy at the back when climbing and it felt less efficient than direct gears although could be a misperception because of the weight as I know their inefficiency is small. I think they've sorted it now but one big annoyance I had was the shifter went the opposite way to the derailleur gear shifters so I would get mixed up when hopping on the mountain bike and end up in completely the wrong gear when wanting to go up a hill.

    I don't use any hub geared bikes now although I don't regret getting a hub gear bike for my first three years of day to day riding, that bike did the job well.

    John
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 16th Apr 17, 7:44 PM
    • 1,663 Posts
    • 2,592 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    I service my own cars and bicycles. Servicing a car has never been simpler. No grease guns. No contact breaker points or carburetors to adjust. I insist on using the best parts I can get.
    Originally posted by fred246
    You can not be serious?
    • fred246
    • By fred246 16th Apr 17, 8:33 PM
    • 1,910 Posts
    • 1,264 Thanks
    fred246
    Yes servicing a car is very easy. All the tricky jobs have gone. The only thing slightly tricky is a cambelt change.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 16th Apr 17, 9:04 PM
    • 9,076 Posts
    • 7,134 Thanks
    esuhl
    Yes servicing a car is very easy.
    Originally posted by fred246
    Fair enough.

    It takes me longer to CLEAN my bicycle than it does to service my car.
    Originally posted by fred246
    There's absolutely no way in hell that servicing a car is going to be easier than cleaning a bicycle!

    Can you elaborate on the difficulties you have? You're definitely doing something wrong!
    Last edited by esuhl; 16-04-2017 at 9:07 PM.
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