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  • FIRST POST
    Honeydog
    Why do grown men ride on the pavement?
    • #1
    • 28th Jan 13, 4:59 PM
    Why do grown men ride on the pavement? 28th Jan 13 at 4:59 PM
    Smallish village. Good wide roads. Good visbility.

    So why do so many blokes ride on the pavement like small children? I see maybe two or three a day when it isn't raining.

    And while I'm on my soapbox. When you ride past me on the trails and I've put my dog on his lead so he doesn't get in your way. Would be be really be expecting too much for you to mutter "Thanks" as you ride by?

    Really looking forward to the answers as I'm genuinely curious about both of these.

    Ta,

    HD
    Don't grow up. Its a trap!

    Peace, love and labradors!
Page 2
    • Voyager2002
    • By Voyager2002 29th Jan 13, 10:39 AM
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    Voyager2002
    I'm a cyclist who sometimes uses the pavement (and I'm male and well out of childhood). I generally do so in situations where riding on the road would be unsafe, or when measures meant for motorists (traffic lights and so forth) would make me wait needlessly. In particular, my main route from town to home involves turning right into a main road and then (since my house is on my right hand side) turning right again across two lanes of fast-moving traffic: it is obviously much safer if I do the final stretch on the pavement on the same side of my house.

    I am very conscious that the pavement "belongs" to pedestrians and so when riding on it I move at walking speed and give way to anyone I encounter. And yes, if I can see that someone has gone to any trouble to help me (such as getting a dog or child out of my path) I would usually thank them.
  • chrisv24
    We have cycle lanes on the pavement where I live so we regularly have cyclists on the pavement rather than the roads. Sometimes, especially on busy national speed limit roads, its best for cyclists to go on the pavement.
    • jblack
    • By jblack 29th Jan 13, 11:40 AM
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    jblack
    There are bad cyclists and bad drivers. As a driver I see a lot more bad cyclists though.

    I had a cyclist banging on the back of my van last week. We were stuck in traffic on a busy main road and crawling along. I heard him banging and shouting so put the handbrake on and got out. He was upset that I was too close to the kerb which meant he couldn't pass. I pointed out that he should be overtaking not undertaking. He didn't seem to get it.

    Anyone using the roads should be following the Highway Code, simple as that. Many cyclists think they above it though.

    IMHO all road users should be insured including cyclists. If a cyclist causes damage or an accident to a pedestrian or another road user it would make getting it sorted a lot easier.
    • liz545
    • By liz545 29th Jan 13, 12:17 PM
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    liz545
    Where I live in London, the majority of people I see cycling on the pavement are in their late teens/early twenties, hoody-wearing males. They don't seem like they'd describe themselves as cyclists, more just that they ride a bike until they get a car, so they're not as likely to invest in cycling gear or think much about cycling safely. They don’t want to be on the road, and it’s unlikely that they’re going to pay too much attention to advice directed at ‘cyclists’ as that’s not how they see themselves.

    My FIL lives in suburban Notts, and cycles occasionally, mostly on the pavement. The roads near him are mostly country lanes, or fast dual carriageways with wide pavements. He’s in his sixties, and told me that while he likes to ride his bike, since he can’t keep pace with the traffic he rides on the pavement so as not to ‘hold anyone up’, riding slowly and carefully when there are pedestrians around. Given dedicated bike lanes, he’d probably use them, but until that point his options are either don’t ride, use the pavement, or ride faster and more assertively, which is unlikely at his age.

    I don’t think it’s right that people ride on the pavement, but I can understand why it happens when we’ve provided space for cars, and space for pedestrians, but not much space for bikes, especially if you’re slower or less confident.
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    • elmer
    • By elmer 29th Jan 13, 2:10 PM
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    elmer
    [QUOTE=jblack;58973493]There are bad cyclists and bad drivers. As a driver I see a lot more bad cyclists though.

    As a cyclist I see a lot more bad drivers than cyclists, and there are a lot more cars out there than bikes!!!!!!



    elmer x
    • ladylouise62
    • By ladylouise62 29th Jan 13, 6:03 PM
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    ladylouise62
    A lot of the time I have no problem with cyclists on the pavement because the roads are damned dangerous, BUT I object to the way that they so rarely seem to slow down because they must feel that they have the right of way, and do not have bike bells (as as kid I always used that to warn people). But around my way the road is a bus route but with access only to the cars so it's not busy and there is no reason for them to use the pavement. If they have no lights then they should not be out, it's not an excuse to use the pavement. I have almost been knocked over 3 times and that was on a very busy no-cycling pedestrianised area.
  • Honeydog
    Some interesting replies thanks folks.

    On the safety note the village has a 30 limit with enough roundabouts and bends etc to ensure that car speeds aren't much above that so safety really isn't an issue. But maybe the pavement riders are all rather nervous types? To be honest the really dodgy bits of road locally don't have any pavement!

    Not seen any female riders on the pavement so that's why I asked about blokes.

    Interestingly enough but probably only to me! Blokes trail riding in twos will usually acknowledge the fact that I've put my dog on the lead for them but blokes on their own won't.

    On the trail I always shout "THANK YOU" very loudly as the chap has just gone past. It won't have any effect on them of course but it amuses me.


    Thanks again anyway especially to those who posted lengthy considered replies.
    Don't grow up. Its a trap!

    Peace, love and labradors!
    • diable
    • By diable 29th Jan 13, 7:32 PM
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    diable
    Thats where the pedestrians are on their mobiles so easier to snatch......
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 29th Jan 13, 8:19 PM
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    Norman Castle
    There are bad cyclists and bad drivers. As a driver I see a lot more bad cyclists though.
    Try cycling. It makes bad drivers more apparent.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 29th Jan 13, 8:26 PM
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    Norman Castle
    On the trail I always shout "THANK YOU" very loudly as the chap has just gone past. It won't have any effect on them of course but it amuses me.
    They don't speak to you because last time they met you you thanked them loudly just for cycling past. They think you're nuts.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • mttylad
    • By mttylad 29th Jan 13, 8:41 PM
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    mttylad
    Why do grown men ride on the pavement?

    Simple, because even grown men are hurt when a bus, van, wagon or car run into them on the road.

    • jblack
    • By jblack 29th Jan 13, 8:55 PM
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    jblack
    And people hurt when they're hit by a cyclist on the pavement. The simple fact of the matter is it is illegal to ride a bike on the pavement.

    My other half was knocked off her motorbike just after Christmas. Simple case of a young driver not looking or indicating before pulling out. Luckily it was a low speed accident so not too bad. Should I suggest she rides on the pavement in future?
    • jblack
    • By jblack 29th Jan 13, 8:57 PM
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    jblack
    As an honest question to those who cycle, why do some insist on riding side-by-side when out together? Is it just so they can talk to each other?
    • thelawnet
    • By thelawnet 29th Jan 13, 9:14 PM
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    thelawnet
    And people hurt when they're hit by a cyclist on the pavement. The simple fact of the matter is it is illegal to ride a bike on the pavement.

    My other half was knocked off her motorbike just after Christmas. Simple case of a young driver not looking or indicating before pulling out. Luckily it was a low speed accident so not too bad. Should I suggest she rides on the pavement in future?
    Originally posted by jblack
    Motorbikes can out-accelerate and out-speed cars. The analogy is not really relevant.
    • thelawnet
    • By thelawnet 29th Jan 13, 9:15 PM
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    thelawnet
    As an honest question to those who cycle, why do some insist on riding side-by-side when out together? Is it just so they can talk to each other?
    Originally posted by jblack
    Yes, I would imagine the same reason why my wife sits in the front seat of the car rather than the back.
    • jblack
    • By jblack 29th Jan 13, 9:26 PM
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    jblack
    Motorbikes can out-accelerate and out-speed cars. The analogy is not really relevant.
    Originally posted by thelawnet
    And a cyclist can out-accelerate and out-speed pedestrians. What's your point?

    If she no longer feels safe on the road (As a lot of cyclists claim.) why can't she ride on the pavement?

    Yes, I would imagine the same reason why my wife sits in the front seat of the car rather than the back.
    Originally posted by thelawnet
    Oh, I thought it was to infuriate drivers who are unable to overtake.
    • jblack
    • By jblack 29th Jan 13, 9:32 PM
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    jblack
    I'm sure I'm not the only one who has met a cyclist on the pavement and done the old 'I move left, they move left, I move right, they move right etc etc' thing.

    The question is who has right of way? Surely it's the pedestrian? What happens if they collide causing injury to either of them? If a car hit me and broke my leg I'd be claiming off their insurance. If a bike hits me and breaks my leg what happens? A firm hand shake and an apology?
    • thelawnet
    • By thelawnet 29th Jan 13, 9:39 PM
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    thelawnet
    And a cyclist can out-accelerate and out-speed pedestrians. What's your point?

    If she no longer feels safe on the road why can't she ride on the pavement?
    Originally posted by jblack
    Because it's against the law and antisocial and regarded as such all over the world.

    On the other hand cycling on the pavement is widely permitted in the UK and more generally and is not necessarily objectionable behaviour.

    Oh, I thought it was to infuriate drivers who are unable to overtake.
    Safe, competent drivers tend to recognise that road traffic and delays are caused by other cars, and that cyclists are the solution rather than the problem.

    Only the terminally dim get infuriated by cyclists not adding to congestion.
    • thelawnet
    • By thelawnet 29th Jan 13, 9:46 PM
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    thelawnet
    I'm sure I'm not the only one who has met a cyclist on the pavement and done the old 'I move left, they move left, I move right, they move right etc etc' thing.

    The question is who has right of way? Surely it's the pedestrian?
    Originally posted by jblack
    That would depend, some pavements have marked pedestrian and cyclist side. IME pedestrians walk on either side with no regard to cyclists, so I would swerve around them, rather than assume that they have any sense.

    What happens if they collide causing injury to either of them? If a car hit me and broke my leg I'd be claiming off their insurance. If a bike hits me and breaks my leg what happens? A firm hand shake and an apology?
    That depends, someone I know damaged a taxi with his bicycle, and he paid the money for this to the taxi driver. Someone else might have refused, in which case you have the opportunity to sue them.

    Ultimately there are many uninsured risks in life - my mother was crippled by a dog, and no compensation was forthcoming despite a great deal of pain and loss of mobility.

    The annual cost of motor vehicle accidents is around 20 billion, and motor vehicle accidents one of the leading causes of premature death. For this reason motor vehicle insurance is mandatory.

    I have yet to see any convincing arguments (as opposed to internet saddos saying 'bikes don't have insurance') that bicycles represent a similar threat.
    • jblack
    • By jblack 29th Jan 13, 9:48 PM
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    jblack
    Because it's against the law and antisocial and regarded as such all over the world.
    Originally posted by thelawnet
    Much the same as cycling on the pavement then?

    On the other hand cycling on the pavement is widely permitted in the UK and more generally and is not necessarily objectionable behaviour.
    Originally posted by thelawnet
    Permitted? Tolerated maybe but I'd not consider it permitted.

    You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement.
    Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A 1984, sect 129


    You only have to read this thread to see some do find it objectionable.
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