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  • FIRST POST
    Honeydog
    Why do grown men ride on the pavement?
    • #1
    • 28th Jan 13, 4:59 PM
    Why do grown men ride on the pavement? 28th Jan 13 at 4:59 PM
    Smallish village. Good wide roads. Good visbility.

    So why do so many blokes ride on the pavement like small children? I see maybe two or three a day when it isn't raining.

    And while I'm on my soapbox. When you ride past me on the trails and I've put my dog on his lead so he doesn't get in your way. Would be be really be expecting too much for you to mutter "Thanks" as you ride by?

    Really looking forward to the answers as I'm genuinely curious about both of these.

    Ta,

    HD
    Don't grow up. Its a trap!

    Peace, love and labradors!
Page 1
    • The ICT Engineer
    • By The ICT Engineer 28th Jan 13, 5:01 PM
    • 599 Posts
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    The ICT Engineer
    • #2
    • 28th Jan 13, 5:01 PM
    • #2
    • 28th Jan 13, 5:01 PM
    Because they are ill manner cowards with no back bone.
    • thelawnet
    • By thelawnet 28th Jan 13, 6:08 PM
    • 2,466 Posts
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    thelawnet
    • #3
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:08 PM
    • #3
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:08 PM
    Smallish village. Good wide roads. Good visbility.

    So why do so many blokes ride on the pavement like small children? I see maybe two or three a day when it isn't raining.
    Originally posted by Honeydog
    A few reasons I can think of:

    * scared of traffic
    * after dark and no lights
    * road design

    An example of the road design issue is as follows:

    The town centre locally is largely pedestrianised with cycling permitted in pedestrianised areas.

    The town is cut off from the residential area to the north by a three-lane dual carriageway.

    To continue north from the town centre by bicycle (cars cannot go north), you must wait for a pelican crossing linked to the traffic lights controlling east-west traffic before crossing to an island.

    From this island you can either cross directly to the right-hand pavement and cycle on the pavement due north. This is controlled by a traffic light, but traffic patterns are such that most traffic from the north is turning right, so the road that you are crossing here (left-turning traffic) is normally clear of traffic and it is easy to see if it is safe to cross.

    The pavement is shared use for pedestrians and cyclists, but only for the distance of about 20 yards, whereupon cyclists are supposed to dismount.

    Continuing a further 20 yards from here, you reach a residential cul-de-sac, where it is simple to ride in the road.

    Obviously many people simply cycle on the pavement all the way through.



    There are now many pavements where it is permitted to cycle. I personally don't like to use them, but if you don't, and prefer to cycle in the road, it is not uncommon for motorists to shout abuse, or even to use their vehicle as a weapon to intimidate you.

    The problem with using shared pavements is they almost invariably end at an inconvenient point, expecting you for example to merge back into traffic running parallel to the pavement you are on. This is very dangerous IME, since you may be cycling along at 10mph or so, and it is neither easy nor natural to come to a complete halt and check the road for traffic before entering it, so you may take risks in doing so.

    The result therefore is that if you use shared pavements at all, in order to avoid hatred motorists, that the safest option is probably to cycle exclusively on the pavement, even where it is not permitted.


    Personally speaking I cycle almost exclusively in the road, avoiding shared schemes.

    But I can understand why people don't. Unfortunately cycling in this country is very much a third class form of transport.

    And while I'm on my soapbox. When you ride past me on the trails and I've put my dog on his lead so he doesn't get in your way. Would be be really be expecting too much for you to mutter "Thanks" as you ride by?
    I have slowed to cycle past people's dogs, and small children, both clearly not under control/properly aware, at walking pace. This is annoying, but I get over it.

    I don't recall hearing 'thanks' for my consideration, but I certainly wouldn't be getting het up about it.

    Also it doesn't help that dog owners reining their dog in when cyclists go past quite often look visibly affronted that you have the nerve to cycle there at all - not really an attitude that lends itself to thanks.
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 28th Jan 13, 6:18 PM
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    Johnmcl7
    • #4
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:18 PM
    • #4
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:18 PM
    I doubt you'll get an answer here as I'd be surprised if anyone here cycles along the pavement for no reason. Mainly up here it seems to be people cycling without lights who cycle on the pavements when it's dark although I do see some people cycling on the pavement for no obvious reason which I find odd as the road is much better for cycling on.

    With regards to people saying thanks, I find it depends where I am. When I'm walking the dog on the streets around the house I find cyclists pretty much never say thanks and rarely even slow down which is extremely irritating particularly as when they're cycling in the dark, at speed with no lights or anything reflective I frequently have to quickly yank my poor dog out of the way. I guess those inconsiderate enough to be cycling on the pavement anyway are not going to show any gratitude.

    When I'm out walking in the countryside though I find most cyclists slow down, give me time to hold my dog and thank me for doing so.

    John
  • spacey2012
    • #5
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:20 PM
    • #5
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:20 PM
    Because they are breaking the law ? Just like you are with your dog not on a lead.
    • HappyMJ
    • By HappyMJ 28th Jan 13, 6:22 PM
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    HappyMJ
    • #6
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:22 PM
    • #6
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:22 PM
    Even the police ride on the pavements around here... They never mention it when I ride on the pavement past them.

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    • thegirlintheattic
    • By thegirlintheattic 28th Jan 13, 6:27 PM
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    thegirlintheattic
    • #7
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:27 PM
    • #7
    • 28th Jan 13, 6:27 PM
    Could be safety. Around here you take your life in your hands cycling. Most of our cyclists use the pavements were possible.
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    • geri1965
    • By geri1965 28th Jan 13, 7:04 PM
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    geri1965
    • #8
    • 28th Jan 13, 7:04 PM
    • #8
    • 28th Jan 13, 7:04 PM
    I much prefer riding in the road. If only they weren't full of huge machines capable of killing me!
  • stephenb80
    • #9
    • 28th Jan 13, 7:16 PM
    • #9
    • 28th Jan 13, 7:16 PM
    hi all i am 32 and i cycle on the pavement becos there is a lot oc idots driving on the road that dont look out for cyclest like the driving insturter who wos driving a lener car while on the mobile. u know when i cought up to him i gave him a pice of my mind. i have been cycleing for 27 years and know the roads better than some of the drivers out ther
    • bryanb
    • By bryanb 28th Jan 13, 7:19 PM
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    bryanb
    Bit of a sexist question. I was forced off the pavement by a grown woman cyclist on Saturday. I was walking by the way!
    This is an open forum, anyone can post and I just did !
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 28th Jan 13, 7:41 PM
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    Norman Castle
    I ride on the pavement from my house to the end of the road due to the two cars I have had written off outside, one parked wholly on the pavement, plus a rear end hit and run. Three neighbours have also had cars written off, one had their wall knocked down. There is regular evidence of further accidents all along the road. Its a 30mph road, most cars travel at 35-40mph. These speeding cars are regularly overtaken despite no safe overtaking areas due to crossings and side roads. Most of the pavement I ride on is 20+ feet wide. I give pedestrians priority and have had no complaints in over 10 years. When riding on the road I regularly feel unsafe and unwelcome. I have had a car drive into me while stationary and in broad daylight.
    I don't thank dog owners as their dog is their responsibility, although I am always friendly toward them. If it needs to be on a lead, put it on one. This may sound harsh but I am nearly as concerned about your dog as you are and will happily slow or stop if needed.
    One thing that bothers me with dog owners. If your dog is on the side of a path and you move aside when you see a cyclist, can you move to the same side as the dog. Many owners move to the opposite side of the path. When the cyclist gets near the dog wants to be near the owner and has to cross the cyclists path. This would not happen if the owner joined the dog on whichever side it is on.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 29-01-2013 at 10:27 AM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

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    • SailorSam
    • By SailorSam 28th Jan 13, 7:52 PM
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    SailorSam
    If i'm somewhere that there are no or very few pedestrians i ride on the pavement or if it's early morning or late afternoon when the viability is poor. I'd rather ride on the road but often you just don't feel safe.
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  • Dave_C
    One thing that bothers me with dog owners. If your dog is on the side of a path and you move aside when you see a cyclist, can you move to the same side as the dog. Many owners move to the opposite side of the path. When the cyclist gets near the dog wants to be near the owner and has to cross the cyclists path. This would not happen if the owner joined the dog on whichever side it is on.
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    Agree totally.

    It's the "how dare you cycle on this track where I'm walking my dog" look that gets me, especially when it's on a national cycle route and all they are doing is letting rover take a dump.

    Dave
    • Mids_Costcutter
    • By Mids_Costcutter 28th Jan 13, 9:12 PM
    • 809 Posts
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    Mids_Costcutter
    Just ask them why, especially the police!
    • fishybusiness
    • By fishybusiness 28th Jan 13, 9:25 PM
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    • 797 Thanks
    fishybusiness
    When you ride past me on the trails and I've put my dog on his lead so he doesn't get in your way. Would be be really be expecting too much for you to mutter "Thanks" as you ride by?
    I tend not to say thanks, more I will say 'Hi' as I go past, just being friendly.

    I see it that I should slow down and be careful, and you should be careful with your dog - just a bit of mutual respect and understanding.

    What I will say is that I should think most people are more worried about the well being of their dog and so put it on a lead so that nutter cyclists don't run in to it and hurt it.
    • edwardw
    • By edwardw 28th Jan 13, 10:07 PM
    • 211 Posts
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    edwardw
    Highway code says max 1000 fine!
    • rdwarr
    • By rdwarr 28th Jan 13, 10:30 PM
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    rdwarr
    Because they are breaking the law ? Just like you are with your dog not on a lead.
    Originally posted by spacey2012
    Well, you're half right. It's only a legal requirement to have a dog on a lead on a "designated road". The OP specifically mentioned "trails".

    However, it is illegal to cycle on pavements. Cyclists who do so are either ignorant of the law or feel that they are above it.
    Can I help?
    • elsien
    • By elsien 28th Jan 13, 10:35 PM
    • 20,233 Posts
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    elsien
    I tend not to move myself or my on-lead dog out of the way of cyclists on the grounds that pavements are for pedestrians. Cyclists are not pedestrians.
    (I'm talking specifically about pavements here, not trails or tracks.)
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

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    • Timay
    • By Timay 28th Jan 13, 10:39 PM
    • 103 Posts
    • 43 Thanks
    Timay
    Smallish village. Good wide roads. Good visbility.

    So why do so many blokes ride on the pavement like small children? I see maybe two or three a day when it isn't raining.

    And while I'm on my soapbox. When you ride past me on the trails and I've put my dog on his lead so he doesn't get in your way. Would be be really be expecting too much for you to mutter "Thanks" as you ride by?

    Really looking forward to the answers as I'm genuinely curious about both of these.

    Ta,

    HD
    Originally posted by Honeydog

    To be honest a lot of pavements have been converted into cycle paths by doing nothing more than putting but up a small blue sign with a bicycle on it and a bicycle painted on the floor every so often.

    Plus it's your responsibility as a dog owner to keep your dog under control so do you really deserve a thanks for something you are required to do?

    BTW I hate cyclist. Ridiculous way of travelling somewhere.
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    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 29th Jan 13, 10:13 AM
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    Norman Castle
    However, it is illegal to cycle on pavements. Cyclists who do so are either ignorant of the law or feel that they are above it.
    On 1st August 1999, new legislation came into force to allow a fixed penalty notice to be served on anyone who is guilty of cycling on a footway. However the Home Office issued guidance on how the new legislation should be applied, indicating that they should only be used where a cyclist is riding in a manner that may endanger others. The then Home Office Minister Paul Boateng issued a letter stating that:
    “The introduction of the fixed penalty is not aimed at responsible cyclists who sometimes feel obliged to use the pavement out of fear of traffic and who show consideration to other pavement users when doing so. Chief police officers, who are responsible for enforcement, acknowledge that many cyclists, particularly children and young people, are afraid to cycle on the road, sensitivity and careful use of police discretion is required.”

    I'm aware of the law and appreciate it being applied intelligently.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 29-01-2013 at 10:17 AM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
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