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  • FIRST POST
    • Caraway90
    • By Caraway90 21st May 19, 2:32 PM
    • 98Posts
    • 77Thanks
    Caraway90
    Pendleton Somerby Hybrid Bike
    • #1
    • 21st May 19, 2:32 PM
    Pendleton Somerby Hybrid Bike 21st May 19 at 2:32 PM
    Has anyone purchased the Pendleton Somerby Hybrid Bike from Halfords?
    I'm looking to get back into, casually, cycling after not having owned a bike since I was a teenager around 15 years ago!

    Any feedback on this model is greatly appreciated
    FTB 2017
Page 1
    • fred246
    • By fred246 21st May 19, 9:13 PM
    • 1,883 Posts
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    fred246
    • #2
    • 21st May 19, 9:13 PM
    • #2
    • 21st May 19, 9:13 PM
    I actually think it looks good. Lightweight frame. No silly useless suspension. Powerful easy to maintain V brakes. 7 speed only I actually like. Lightweight. Easy to adjust the gears. You will find on a steep hill you probably have to stand up to pedal whereas with a 27 24 or 21 speed bike you would have a lower ratio available. Reasonable price.
    • Caraway90
    • By Caraway90 22nd May 19, 1:22 PM
    • 98 Posts
    • 77 Thanks
    Caraway90
    • #3
    • 22nd May 19, 1:22 PM
    • #3
    • 22nd May 19, 1:22 PM
    I actually think it looks good. Lightweight frame. No silly useless suspension. Powerful easy to maintain V brakes. 7 speed only I actually like. Lightweight. Easy to adjust the gears. You will find on a steep hill you probably have to stand up to pedal whereas with a 27 24 or 21 speed bike you would have a lower ratio available. Reasonable price.
    Originally posted by fred246
    Thanks for your reply. I live in a very flat part of the country so won't have to worry about steep hills. Having not cycled for a while I don't think I would know what to do with more than 7 gears
    FTB 2017
    • fred246
    • By fred246 23rd May 19, 1:05 PM
    • 1,883 Posts
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    fred246
    • #4
    • 23rd May 19, 1:05 PM
    • #4
    • 23rd May 19, 1:05 PM
    Looks like it's been reduced in price. Cheaper on the website now.
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 23rd May 19, 3:42 PM
    • 3,238 Posts
    • 3,071 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    • #5
    • 23rd May 19, 3:42 PM
    • #5
    • 23rd May 19, 3:42 PM
    Never underestimate the benefit of a light bike!


    I've got a (nearly) 30 year old Dawes hybrid with a steel frame but it is as light as a feather compared to my wife's newish Dawes Duchess* which weighs as much as a Panzer tank. Getting it in and out of our hallway is like a really intensive weight training session. Not as bad as her previous Marin Redwood which had front suspension and was even heavier.


    * Nice bike though.
    • Voyager2002
    • By Voyager2002 23rd May 19, 6:10 PM
    • 13,422 Posts
    • 9,246 Thanks
    Voyager2002
    • #6
    • 23rd May 19, 6:10 PM
    • #6
    • 23rd May 19, 6:10 PM
    See this review from the Guardian: "cheap and poorly made"... "rubbish components", I don't think they liked it very much.
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/nov/15/pendleton-somerby-hybrid-bike-review
    • Houbara
    • By Houbara 23rd May 19, 7:53 PM
    • 4,866 Posts
    • 3,352 Thanks
    Houbara
    • #7
    • 23rd May 19, 7:53 PM
    • #7
    • 23rd May 19, 7:53 PM
    I actually think it looks good. Lightweight frame. No silly useless suspension. Powerful easy to maintain V brakes. 7 speed only I actually like. Lightweight. Easy to adjust the gears. You will find on a steep hill you probably have to stand up to pedal whereas with a 27 24 or 21 speed bike you would have a lower ratio available. Reasonable price.
    Originally posted by fred246
    Lightweight ! do me a favour. .its approx 14.6 kg ! what a heavy lump that is..you must be used to one of these appalling mountain bikes made out of pig iron if you consider that thing light.
    knock 4 kilos off it and it would be an improvement and worth buying..Extra weight means extra energy needed to propel it.
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 23rd May 19, 9:37 PM
    • 2,467 Posts
    • 2,752 Thanks
    parking_question_chap
    • #8
    • 23rd May 19, 9:37 PM
    • #8
    • 23rd May 19, 9:37 PM
    I actually think it looks good. Lightweight frame. No silly useless suspension. Powerful easy to maintain V brakes. 7 speed only I actually like. Lightweight. Easy to adjust the gears. You will find on a steep hill you probably have to stand up to pedal whereas with a 27 24 or 21 speed bike you would have a lower ratio available. Reasonable price.
    Originally posted by fred246

    Lightweight? Its well over 14 kilograms! What do you consider a heavy frame? pig iron?

    And if you start going a bit further afield, 7 gears isnt ideal. The brakes are very basic as well.

    There are much better bikes out there for a similar price.
    • fred246
    • By fred246 24th May 19, 5:43 AM
    • 1,883 Posts
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    fred246
    • #9
    • 24th May 19, 5:43 AM
    • #9
    • 24th May 19, 5:43 AM
    Most ladies bicycles of this sort are in the 17-20kg area. The lightest Pashley is 17kg. Part of it is the mudguards and rack. If you are happy to carry a bag on your back and arrive at your destination covered in mud you can get lighter bikes. Hub gears will give you a greater range but are heavy and a front derailleur also adds extra weight to a bicycle. That review in the Guardian is particularly poor journalism. There is only one bolt on a saddle and you would know if it fell off. Bolts don't just fall off even if they are cheap. The review was basically saying I prefer another brand which cost approx 3 times as much. V brakes are fine. Shimano gears are good. If you spend more you will get a better bike. I would buy mail order but some people like to have a Halfords they can go to. The reviews from the people actually buying the bicycle are good.
    • Brand_X
    • By Brand_X 24th May 19, 11:03 PM
    • 57 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Brand_X
    I would avoid Halfords. The bike is probably fine, but Halfords bike mechanics are a very random mix of proper mechanics, and shaved monkeys. You never know who put your bike together, and it really does matter; you do not want to be fobbed-off with something that creaks and squeaks. Also, some of the components may be cheap and prone to rusting; do not go by what the bike looks like in the shop, I've seen many swish looking Halfords bikes turn into rusty junkers after a few months outside.



    Try to find a good independent bike shop in your area; you'll pay more for the bike, but it's less hassle in the long run. I'd expect a bike for you to cost around £300 - £350. There are often great bargains to be had in the sales but you have to weigh that against losing half a year of good riding weather.



    I am not a bike snob; the frames and forks on some really super-cheap bikes are absolutely fine, but the less obvious components like the gear set and crank can be really cheap and nasty, which is no problem for some people who strip the bike and put their own bits on it, but obviously what you want is an off the shelf bike, all sorted, no fussing. A £300 bike will do you fine I think.



    Don't go to Halfords, go to a proper bike shop, be honest about exactly how much you want to spend, and ask them to sort something out for you. You might end up with a quite different bike from what you originally planned, but the most important thing (apart from safety) is that the bike fits you comfortably.



    The only bikes I would advise against are anything with "drop handlebars" - racer type bikes. I don't care what anyone says, they are NEVER, EVER safe to ride for a beginner or someone who has not cycled for a long time.
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 25th May 19, 7:09 PM
    • 2,467 Posts
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    parking_question_chap
    The only bikes I would advise against are anything with "drop handlebars" - racer type bikes. I don't care what anyone says, they are NEVER, EVER safe to ride for a beginner or someone who has not cycled for a long time.
    Originally posted by Brand_X
    While its probably easier to get back into cycling on a mountain bike or hybrid, road bikes are not "unsafe" for newbies or people getting back in after a break.

    You dont learn something by not doing it. All you need to do learn somewhere appropriate. Find an empty car park or quiet and well surfaced residential street and get on with it, which is exactly what I did a few years ago with my first road bike. At first I was a bit wobbly with the slim tyres and narrow hand position, but it gets familiar very quickly. Whatsmore you spend most of the time on the tops or hoods. I spend less than 5% of my time in the drops.

    Ok, if somebody is obese and has no coordination then obviously they would be well advised to avoid roadbikes, but those people are generally not going to be cycling anyway.
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 26th May 19, 8:00 AM
    • 1,636 Posts
    • 2,566 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    Hard to think why anyone these days would buy a bike that didn’t have disc brakes.
    • fred246
    • By fred246 26th May 19, 10:05 AM
    • 1,883 Posts
    • 1,239 Thanks
    fred246
    Hard to think why anyone these days would buy a bike that didnít have disc brakes.
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton
    Maybe when you are looking for a classic ladies bicycle from Halfords. They all have v-brakes. None of them have discs.
    • cubegame
    • By cubegame 26th May 19, 10:07 AM
    • 1,861 Posts
    • 1,037 Thanks
    cubegame
    Hard to think why anyone these days would buy a bike that didnít have disc brakes.
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton
    Plenty of reasons not to.

    The extra weight and the extra care and attention needed to keep them running efficiently are two main ones.

    The main reason bikes have disc brakes is because manufacturers need to constantly add new stuff to new models to differentiate.
    • Nebulous2
    • By Nebulous2 26th May 19, 10:45 AM
    • 2,533 Posts
    • 1,683 Thanks
    Nebulous2
    Plenty of reasons not to.

    The extra weight and the extra care and attention needed to keep them running efficiently are two main ones.

    The main reason bikes have disc brakes is because manufacturers need to constantly add new stuff to new models to differentiate.
    Originally posted by cubegame

    Do you still drive a car with drum brakes all round?

    Have you tried disc brakes?

    I, initially somewhat reluctantly, moved over and I'm impressed. They need less maintenance and the weight isn't an issue. It effectively moves some weight from the rims where it needs more effort to move it to the hub where it needs less.

    If people are very occasional riders it may not matter very much, but for people riding a lot in all weathers they bring a lot of advantages.
    • cubegame
    • By cubegame 26th May 19, 11:47 AM
    • 1,861 Posts
    • 1,037 Thanks
    cubegame
    Do you still drive a car with drum brakes all round?

    Have you tried disc brakes?

    I, initially somewhat reluctantly, moved over and I'm impressed. They need less maintenance and the weight isn't an issue. It effectively moves some weight from the rims where it needs more effort to move it to the hub where it needs less.

    If people are very occasional riders it may not matter very much, but for people riding a lot in all weathers they bring a lot of advantages.
    Originally posted by Nebulous2
    A car needs much much more stopping power so it's not a useful comparison.

    On a bike, disc brakes are the best way to compensate for poor braking technique. If you brake properly (ie. Using only the front brake) they are actually quite dangerous because of the non-linear modulation.
    • Nebulous2
    • By Nebulous2 26th May 19, 1:05 PM
    • 2,533 Posts
    • 1,683 Thanks
    Nebulous2
    A car needs much much more stopping power so it's not a useful comparison.

    On a bike, disc brakes are the best way to compensate for poor braking technique. If you brake properly (ie. Using only the front brake) they are actually quite dangerous because of the non-linear modulation.
    Originally posted by cubegame
    The car comparison is a useful one - to highlight that technology changes and some people have difficulty changing with it.

    That argument about modulation is nonsense. One of the advantages of disc brakes is that the modulation is much better than with pads.

    I see you've now sidestepped the maintenance issues of rim brakes and the weight that you asserted earlier.
    Last edited by Nebulous2; 26-05-2019 at 1:07 PM.
    • cubegame
    • By cubegame 26th May 19, 1:39 PM
    • 1,861 Posts
    • 1,037 Thanks
    cubegame
    The car comparison is a useful one - to highlight that technology changes and some people have difficulty changing with it.

    That argument about modulation is nonsense. One of the advantages of disc brakes is that the modulation is much better than with pads.

    I see you've now sidestepped the maintenance issues of rim brakes and the weight that you asserted earlier.
    Originally posted by Nebulous2
    It all depends if the technology is necessary or is being developed to sell bikes. It's easy to sell people stuff they don't need.

    The modulation argument is about braking ability. If you front brake only (ie. properly) then disc brake modulation is poor as it's non-linear (it grabs). If you're less technically able as a rider then disc brakes will help you to compensate for that.

    Maintenance is known to be an issue with discs. I fettle bikes a lot and I spend much more time tuning my disc brake bikes than the rim brake bikes (a pad change is not onerous).

    Disc brakes are heavier, end of. They also require heavier wheels and forks to cope with the braking forces at the hub.
    • Nebulous2
    • By Nebulous2 26th May 19, 2:13 PM
    • 2,533 Posts
    • 1,683 Thanks
    Nebulous2
    It all depends if the technology is necessary or is being developed to sell bikes. It's easy to sell people stuff they don't need.

    The modulation argument is about braking ability. If you front brake only (ie. properly) then disc brake modulation is poor as it's non-linear (it grabs). If you're less technically able as a rider then disc brakes will help you to compensate for that.

    Maintenance is known to be an issue with discs. I fettle bikes a lot and I spend much more time tuning my disc brake bikes than the rim brake bikes (a pad change is not onerous).

    Disc brakes are heavier, end of. They also require heavier wheels and forks to cope with the braking forces at the hub.
    Originally posted by cubegame
    Again - that is rubbish. Modulation with disc brakes is better than with pads. It is also more consistent, much less affected by wet weather for instance.

    Changing pads is fine, but if you're cycling a lot rim brakes will wear out the rims. You then need new wheels, or to get the wheels rebuilt with new rims.

    Cable discs can be awkward to setup, but hydraulic discs rarely need anything other than new pads.

    Swings and roundabouts with weight. You need a decent fork and thru-axles are preferable, but you save on the rims as you don't need a brake track. Moving weight to the centre of the wheel reduces the effort it takes to get up to speed.
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 26th May 19, 4:36 PM
    • 1,636 Posts
    • 2,566 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    The main reason bikes have disc brakes is because manufacturers need to constantly add new stuff to new models to differentiate.
    Originally posted by cubegame
    Oh God, youíre just SO right! Granny was always complaining that car manufacturers only used starter motors in cars to sell a more expensive car...... what the freak is wrong with a hand crank.... lazy people with too much money is what she said!
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