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  • FIRST POST
    • Caraway90
    • By Caraway90 21st May 19, 2:32 PM
    • 98Posts
    • 77Thanks
    Caraway90
    Pendleton Somerby Hybrid Bike
    • #1
    • 21st May 19, 2:32 PM
    Pendleton Somerby Hybrid Bike 21st May 19 at 2:32 PM
    Has anyone purchased the Pendleton Somerby Hybrid Bike from Halfords?
    I'm looking to get back into, casually, cycling after not having owned a bike since I was a teenager around 15 years ago!

    Any feedback on this model is greatly appreciated
    FTB 2017
Page 2
    • cubegame
    • By cubegame 26th May 19, 4:37 PM
    • 1,864 Posts
    • 1,037 Thanks
    cubegame
    Again - that is rubbish. Modulation with disc brakes is better than with pads. It is also more consistent, much less affected by wet weather for instance.

    Changing pads is fine, but if you're cycling a lot rim brakes will wear out the rims. You then need new wheels, or to get the wheels rebuilt with new rims.

    Cable discs can be awkward to setup, but hydraulic discs rarely need anything other than new pads.

    Swings and roundabouts with weight. You need a decent fork and thru-axles are preferable, but you save on the rims as you don't need a brake track. Moving weight to the centre of the wheel reduces the effort it takes to get up to speed.
    Originally posted by Nebulous2
    Yes, I'll get through a front wheel every 18 months or so; but it's a consumable. No biggie.

    As I've said, the only way you will know that rim brakes are better is if you can brake properly.
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 26th May 19, 4:44 PM
    • 1,667 Posts
    • 2,594 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    A car needs much much more stopping power so it's not a useful comparison.
    Originally posted by cubegame
    Your going quickly, down a hill maybe..... its raining, a car pulls out in front of you. Disc brakes will work from the moment you pull on them not so with rim brakes..... I wonder how many deaths/serious injury/injuries can be attributed to the difference in brake choice?
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 26th May 19, 4:47 PM
    • 1,667 Posts
    • 2,594 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    Yes, I'll get through a front wheel every 18 months or so; but it's a consumable. No biggie..
    Originally posted by cubegame
    Your either very wealthy or you use crappy wheels... I know what my money is on!
    • Nebulous2
    • By Nebulous2 26th May 19, 5:06 PM
    • 2,549 Posts
    • 1,707 Thanks
    Nebulous2
    Yes, I'll get through a front wheel every 18 months or so; but it's a consumable. No biggie.

    As I've said, the only way you will know that rim brakes are better is if you can brake properly.
    Originally posted by cubegame

    You mean pulling on the back brake and skidding to a halt like we did in primary school isn't the way to do it? You're not the only person that can brake you know. A lot of road bikes have 160mm discs on the front and 140mm ones at the back to give more power to the front brake. See this.

    "The advantages of disc brakes, with their improved control and reliability show the system certainly has its appeals."

    Or this. YouTube link from gcn showing disc brakes stop 7 metres faster In very wet conditions.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 26th May 19, 7:49 PM
    • 2,763 Posts
    • 4,178 Thanks
    silverwhistle
    Thank you Mr_Singleton with your sarcastic post for confirming my opinion of you gained elsewhere on these boards.



    What you all see to have missed are the requirements of the OP. Wet braking ability is probably low down the list of requirements along with "getting up to speed". They just want to get back into cycling, without being intimidated by enthusiasts discussing their preferences.


    FWIW I've never had disc brakes on two wheels, years ago rather wish I had on my motorbike, but my current S/H bike gets me nearly 3 miles to town, or a couple to the GP's or further on excursions with no issue. Never had to brake so hard that discs would make a difference and I make allowances for thoughtless pedestrians and suicidal cats.


    When I bought it I had to replace the chain, rear mech and cog myself along with new tyres but apart from the latter (Schwalbes) I really couldn't tell you what they were: it really isn't that important for casual cyclists.
    • Caraway90
    • By Caraway90 28th May 19, 3:49 PM
    • 98 Posts
    • 77 Thanks
    Caraway90
    Sorry for the late reply, and thank you for everyone's replies. I have to admit some of them went over my head though!
    I ended up ordering the bike and I'm picking it up this evening. This is a purely leisure bike and I don't intend to take it out in the rain (obviously if it rains whilst I'm out then so be it!).The majority of the time I will be cyclying on flat, tarmac paths and hopefully this bike serves me well on those
    FTB 2017
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 28th May 19, 4:28 PM
    • 2,763 Posts
    • 4,178 Thanks
    silverwhistle
    Good to hear it, I'm sure you'll enjoy it. You'll see other discussions by enthusiasts and maybe in the future you'll join them but in the meantime just get out there...
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 28th May 19, 5:34 PM
    • 2,477 Posts
    • 2,803 Thanks
    parking_question_chap
    Hard to think why anyone these days would buy a bike that didn’t have disc brakes.
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton

    Only significant difference in retardation is when they are wet and dirty.

    If you are spending most of your time on the road and not shooting along at 20+ miles per hour, calipers are perfectly fine.

    The limiting factor for most people is twofold.

    Firstly actually knowing how to apply the brakes correctly and secondly keeping them well maintained.
    • Caraway90
    • By Caraway90 6th Jun 19, 11:13 AM
    • 98 Posts
    • 77 Thanks
    Caraway90
    Little update - I am loving my new bike! It's perfect for my needs
    FTB 2017
    • Richard53
    • By Richard53 16th Jun 19, 3:21 AM
    • 2,950 Posts
    • 2,455 Thanks
    Richard53
    Just to add my 2d to the disc brake debate. I have ridden bikes with side-pull, centre-pull, caliper, drum and V-brakes. All are good if they are correctly fitted, adjusted and maintained.


    However, I have hydraulic discs on both my bikes, and I wouldn't go back. They are an absolute joy to use, being powerful, smooth, sensitive and consistent no matter what the weather, and they never need adjusting. Apart from very easy pad changes, there is no maintenance beyond just a weekly check that everything looks right.


    They are slightly heavier than the alternatives, so probably not suitable for the Tour de France, but for a normal road rider I can't see a single downside.


    Just my experience. And I am glad the OP has a bike she likes.
    If someone is nice to you but rude to the waiter, they are not a nice person.
    • Kentish Dave
    • By Kentish Dave 16th Jun 19, 7:52 AM
    • 806 Posts
    • 1,501 Thanks
    Kentish Dave
    I do a fair amount of riding in the Pyrenees, and while disc brakes would be good I have never, ever had a problem with rim brakes, including when actually descending in a race.

    My bike for down there was not crazy expensive but even those who spent many thousands tended to favour rim brakes. There’s also the fact that in some races disc brakes are not allowed.
    • fred246
    • By fred246 16th Jun 19, 12:26 PM
    • 1,910 Posts
    • 1,266 Thanks
    fred246
    Can anyone recommend a 250 classic ladies bicycle with hydraulic disc brakes?
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 16th Jun 19, 1:39 PM
    • 1,667 Posts
    • 2,594 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    Can anyone recommend a 250 classic ladies bicycle with hydraulic disc brakes?
    Originally posted by fred246
    That's a huge ask. Besides I suspect a service on hydraulic brakes will cost more than the bike is worth.

    What's wrong with cables especially at that budget and bike type?
    • fred246
    • By fred246 16th Jun 19, 2:24 PM
    • 1,910 Posts
    • 1,266 Thanks
    fred246
    Well I was the one who said it was a good bike for the money. We then had the lightweight brigade and then you started on about disc brakes.
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 16th Jun 19, 3:22 PM
    • 1,667 Posts
    • 2,594 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    The bike you originally mentioned was a monster weight wise which probably would have had you struggling to handle. I know a number of people that hate Boris bikes because of the weight. So, the focus on a lighter bike is a good one.

    I mentioned disc brakes because for somebody coming back into cycling after a long break it will give them much more confidence. You use the brakes and you slow and stop straight away rather than rim brakes which have to shed all of the water off the wheel rim before stopping. The extra meters in stopping could mean hitting something especially for a beginner.

    Hydraulic brakes are for top end fast bikes, with your cheapy granny bike you’d be better off with cable pull disc brakes.
    • Houbara
    • By Houbara 16th Jun 19, 5:17 PM
    • 4,876 Posts
    • 3,353 Thanks
    Houbara
    The bike you originally mentioned was a monster weight wise which probably would have had you struggling to handle. I know a number of people that hate Boris bikes because of the weight. So, the focus on a lighter bike is a good one.

    I mentioned disc brakes because for somebody coming back into cycling after a long break it will give them much more confidence. You use the brakes and you slow and stop straight away rather than rim brakes which have to shed all of the water off the wheel rim before stopping. The extra meters in stopping could mean hitting something especially for a beginner.

    Hydraulic brakes are for top end fast bikes, with your cheapy granny bike youd be better off with cable pull disc brakes.
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton
    I have a mountain bike with hydraulic disc brakes and a pricy carbon framed road bike with normal cantilever brakes and they work better and faster than the complex hydraulic brakes on the mountain bike. Even the discs and pads are affected a little by really bad rain .They are not immune from water between disc and pads.. Cars front discs brakes are the same
    . My cantilever brakes stop very well in the wet too.Possibly theres a slight delay on full braking but not enough to cause excessive danger unless going high speed down a steep hill in pouring rain.
    Anyone commuting on a slow and heavy bike will not be going much faster than 12 mph I would have thought. Disc brakes , especially hydraulic ones are an absolute pain to service themselves compared to simple and better normal wired brakes.
    The majority of pro s in the Tour de France still use rim type brakes and they are averaging 30 mph speeds.
    Last edited by Houbara; 16-06-2019 at 5:57 PM.
    • fred246
    • By fred246 16th Jun 19, 6:21 PM
    • 1,910 Posts
    • 1,266 Thanks
    fred246
    The OP was looking at a bicycle with mudguards, chain guard and rack fitted. Very reasonable 14kg. A Boris bike is 23kg. Weight of bike makes little influence to cycling speed.
    • onashoestring
    • By onashoestring 3rd Aug 19, 8:20 AM
    • 247 Posts
    • 471 Thanks
    onashoestring
    Free Test Ride Pendleton Somerby Electric Bike & others.
    Halfords are offering a 48 hour Electric Bike trial, the opportunity to test ride a Carrera Crossfire-E Mens/Womens Electric Hybrid Bike, Carrera Crosscity Electric Bike or the Pendleton Somerby Electric Bike for up to 48 hours for FREE. Getting started is simple:

    Enter your postcode into store locator to find your nearest 48 hour electric bike trial store.
    book a phone consultation for a time that suits you.
    Pick up your E-Bike at the booked time - don't forget that you need bring with you a valid debit or credit card and passport or driving licence!
    Enjoy taking your E-Bike for a spin!
    Return your E-Bike back the store at your allotted time.

    https://www.halfords.com/advice/cycling/buyers-guides/electric-bikes-buyers-guide-halfords
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