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    • scaredofdebt
    • By scaredofdebt 7th Nov 19, 5:36 PM
    • 1,415Posts
    • 701Thanks
    scaredofdebt
    Retraining Ideas
    • #1
    • 7th Nov 19, 5:36 PM
    Retraining Ideas 7th Nov 19 at 5:36 PM
    Hi,


    Just after some general advice, comments etc.


    I am in my late forties, have spent the last 20 odd years working in offices, IT and Business Analysis type roles.


    I am very likely to be made redundant in the next few months and I will get enough of a payout to take 9 months or so off to retrain.


    I am sick of working in offices and really want to try something different.


    One thing I am looking at is retraining to be a gas engineer, ie fitting /repairing/servicing boilers.


    I quite like getting my hands dirty and am versatile and not scared of hard work. The courses are not cheap, best I've found so far is 7k and it takes about a year, so even with my payout this will be a struggle financially.


    But I am open to other ideas, if you could retrain what would you do?


    Another idea I have is to open a shop in the local town, it's quite touristy but I suspect my finances won't stretch to that, I have retail management experience and I did enjoy doing that type of work.


    Anyway, feel free to comment, ideally constructively!


    Thanks.
    Make 2018 in 2018 Challenge - Total to date 2,108
Page 1
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 7th Nov 19, 6:03 PM
    • 19,536 Posts
    • 12,215 Thanks
    motorguy
    • #2
    • 7th Nov 19, 6:03 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Nov 19, 6:03 PM
    Hi,


    Just after some general advice, comments etc.


    I am in my late forties, have spent the last 20 odd years working in offices, IT and Business Analysis type roles.


    I am very likely to be made redundant in the next few months and I will get enough of a payout to take 9 months or so off to retrain.


    I am sick of working in offices and really want to try something different.


    One thing I am looking at is retraining to be a gas engineer, ie fitting /repairing/servicing boilers.


    I quite like getting my hands dirty and am versatile and not scared of hard work. The courses are not cheap, best I've found so far is 7k and it takes about a year, so even with my payout this will be a struggle financially.


    But I am open to other ideas, if you could retrain what would you do?


    Another idea I have is to open a shop in the local town, it's quite touristy but I suspect my finances won't stretch to that, I have retail management experience and I did enjoy doing that type of work.


    Anyway, feel free to comment, ideally constructively!


    Thanks.
    Originally posted by scaredofdebt
    I think your idea to retrain with a specific skill is along the right track.

    Your idea to open a bricks and mortar shop is a bad one. They cost a fortune to run and the odds of starting one, getting it up and running and making a success of it are practically nil - thats nothing against you by the way, its a reflection of the high street these days.

    Do continue to do what you're doing though - think carefully before jumping in to anything. You have what sounds like a very useful amount of money coming to you which would make an excellent nest egg / house deposit / chunk off the mortgage for down the line.
    Last edited by motorguy; 07-11-2019 at 6:08 PM.
    Life has never given me lemons.

    It has given me anger issues, anxiety, a love for alcohol and a serious dislike for stupid people, but not lemons.
    • Mrs Soup
    • By Mrs Soup 7th Nov 19, 6:21 PM
    • 621 Posts
    • 1,138 Thanks
    Mrs Soup
    • #3
    • 7th Nov 19, 6:21 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Nov 19, 6:21 PM
    Any chance of starting the training now on a part time evening class type basis?
    • eamon
    • By eamon 7th Nov 19, 6:52 PM
    • 1,909 Posts
    • 1,352 Thanks
    eamon
    • #4
    • 7th Nov 19, 6:52 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Nov 19, 6:52 PM
    I would suggest that you don't do any of those courses unless you are supported practically by an employer. You just won't get the neccesary field/site experience to reinforce all the theory that you paying a lot of money for. In other words if you are serious about retraining then consider being an an adult apprentice. They do exist and admittedly the numbers are tiny. There must be resources on the internet that you can use as well as any contacts that you/your friends/family have. That will be a much better investment than spending a chunk of your redundancy on a worthless course.
    • Les79
    • By Les79 7th Nov 19, 7:04 PM
    • 1,275 Posts
    • 1,585 Thanks
    Les79
    • #5
    • 7th Nov 19, 7:04 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Nov 19, 7:04 PM
    Your idea to open a bricks and mortar shop is a bad one. They cost a fortune to run and the odds of starting one, getting it up and running and making a success of it are practically nil - thats nothing against you by the way, its a reflection of the high street these days.
    Originally posted by motorguy
    Not necessarily, there's still some money in bricks and mortar if you get the industry/location/costs etc right.

    There's also the possibility of a start up loan, which appears to help in the writing of a business plan and some free mentoring (if successful).
    • scaredofdebt
    • By scaredofdebt 7th Nov 19, 7:06 PM
    • 1,415 Posts
    • 701 Thanks
    scaredofdebt
    • #6
    • 7th Nov 19, 7:06 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Nov 19, 7:06 PM
    Thanks so far all.


    The course is 8 weeks in a "classroom" type environment then you get a 10 month "on the job" placement with a qualified heating engineer, so I guess that'll be me doing all the hard work.


    I was wondering if the course could be done more quickly, still looking around for other providers.


    Yeah, good point about shops, they are expensive to set up, it is risky.


    Anyway, thanks again, keep up the ideas.
    Make 2018 in 2018 Challenge - Total to date 2,108
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 7th Nov 19, 10:23 PM
    • 40,181 Posts
    • 37,581 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    • #7
    • 7th Nov 19, 10:23 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Nov 19, 10:23 PM
    The course is 8 weeks in a "classroom" type environment then you get a 10 month "on the job" placement with a qualified heating engineer, so I guess that'll be me doing all the hard work.
    Originally posted by scaredofdebt
    Good. Read the small print carefully, if you can get onto a formal apprentice scheme that is better than anything less formal (because the employer is making more of a commitment).

    I was wondering if the course could be done more quickly, still looking around for other providers.
    Originally posted by scaredofdebt
    To be honest, I'd like to think that anyone playing around with my gas appliances had spent at least a year in training, with supervision throughout that time. There are reasons why only CORGI registered engineers can legally tackle gas appliances ...
    Still knitting!
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    Current projects: pink balaclava (for myself), seaman's hat, about to start another cardigan!
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 8th Nov 19, 4:47 PM
    • 12,325 Posts
    • 10,916 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #8
    • 8th Nov 19, 4:47 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Nov 19, 4:47 PM

    To be honest, I'd like to think that anyone playing around with my gas appliances had spent at least a year in training, with supervision throughout that time. There are reasons why only CORGI registered engineers can legally tackle gas appliances ...
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    CORGI no longer exists in this form, it is now Gas Safe. So beware of anyone who is CORGI registered but not Gas Safe
    • Pennywise
    • By Pennywise 8th Nov 19, 5:02 PM
    • 12,230 Posts
    • 24,235 Thanks
    Pennywise
    • #9
    • 8th Nov 19, 5:02 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Nov 19, 5:02 PM
    Have you thought about railway work, i.e. train driver or guard, signalling/control, or even getting into railway engineering. There's so much work being done at the moment, new lines, improvement works, electrification programs, etc., which will continue with the need for better public transport, reduced car use etc. Lots of railway jobs are pretty well paid and training is usually provided by the employer.
    • Blatchford
    • By Blatchford 8th Nov 19, 5:55 PM
    • 337 Posts
    • 504 Thanks
    Blatchford
    Have you thought about railway work, i.e. train driver or guard, signalling/control, or even getting into railway engineering. There's so much work being done at the moment, new lines, improvement works, electrification programs, etc., which will continue with the need for better public transport, reduced car use etc. Lots of railway jobs are pretty well paid and training is usually provided by the employer.
    Originally posted by Pennywise
    Unless you are a labourer, railway engineering requires degrees and years of experience. Labouring is well paid, but almost impossible to get into. The railways are phasing out guards and "passenger safety" plus it takes a couple of years to get a job. Train driver - no chance. Guards can spend years trying to get a place. And actually, lots are no longer well paid or even secure. Don't believe the guff about better public transport. It makes nice headlines. Nobody means it.
    • Blatchford
    • By Blatchford 8th Nov 19, 5:57 PM
    • 337 Posts
    • 504 Thanks
    Blatchford
    Plumbing. If you are willing to work hard, and take household jobs, there aren't enough of them anywhere in the country.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 8th Nov 19, 6:15 PM
    • 19,536 Posts
    • 12,215 Thanks
    motorguy
    Not necessarily, there's still some money in bricks and mortar if you get the industry/location/costs etc right.

    There's also the possibility of a start up loan, which appears to help in the writing of a business plan and some free mentoring (if successful).
    Originally posted by Les79
    I stand by what i said - the odds of starting a bricks and mortar business in a town from scratch with no experience (and no idea on what to open either) and making it a success are close to nil.

    Not impossible, but close to nil.
    Life has never given me lemons.

    It has given me anger issues, anxiety, a love for alcohol and a serious dislike for stupid people, but not lemons.
    • Blatchford
    • By Blatchford 8th Nov 19, 6:30 PM
    • 337 Posts
    • 504 Thanks
    Blatchford
    I stand by what i said - the odds of starting a bricks and mortar business in a town from scratch with no experience (and no idea on what to open either) and making it a success are close to nil.

    Not impossible, but close to nil.
    Originally posted by motorguy
    But if it didn't work out, they could claim discrimination and everything will be ok. I believe that's the usual advice given. But I'm with you. Shops are hard work even for the initiated - real or online. You really have to know what you are doing, have a nichecv and also be lucky.
    • Les79
    • By Les79 8th Nov 19, 8:02 PM
    • 1,275 Posts
    • 1,585 Thanks
    Les79
    I stand by what i said - the odds of starting a bricks and mortar business in a town from scratch with no experience (and no idea on what to open either) and making it a success are close to nil.

    Not impossible, but close to nil.
    Originally posted by motorguy
    Indeed, it is very difficult. But certainly worth exploring if OP so wishes

    It is, in my opinion, better to gather the facts (locations available, initial/running costs, market size, draft business plan) before writing off the idea entirely.
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