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  • FIRST POST
    • little_lil
    • By little_lil 20th Aug 05, 3:09 PM
    • 379Posts
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    little_lil
    Wine to Cook with
    • #1
    • 20th Aug 05, 3:09 PM
    Wine to Cook with 20th Aug 05 at 3:09 PM
    Hi

    I was just wondering which wines you use to cook with, for example i always buy lambrini to cook with if a white wine is needed (it makes lovely chicken gravy ) and it is the cheapest white i can find in tescos.

    If i need a red i just grab whatever is in the cupboard as i don't know one red from another (once used the most expensive and OH was not impressed)

    Does the type/cost of wine make much difference to the end result of the dish you are cooking?

    lil
Page 1
    • moggins
    • By moggins 20th Aug 05, 3:37 PM
    • 5,177 Posts
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    moggins
    • #2
    • 20th Aug 05, 3:37 PM
    • #2
    • 20th Aug 05, 3:37 PM
    I always learned that you never put anything in your cooking that you wouldn't pour directly down your throat
    Organised people are just too lazy to look for things

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    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 20th Aug 05, 4:04 PM
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    squeaky
    • #3
    • 20th Aug 05, 4:04 PM
    • #3
    • 20th Aug 05, 4:04 PM
    My lad, the chef, says "If it isn't good enough to drink it's not good enough to cook with".
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

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  • competitionscafe
    • #4
    • 20th Aug 05, 4:12 PM
    • #4
    • 20th Aug 05, 4:12 PM
    If I only need a glass or so for the cooking I would use whatever I was drinking with the meal.

    For chicken a glass of dry vermouth (eg: Noilly Prat) works well. It keeps for ages too so you can just use it as you need it. For lamb, (dry) Marsala is nice - also makes a good mustard sauce for pork with cream/creme fraiche, grain mustard, salt, pepper. Madeira goes well with pork too. Marsala is nice in an onion gravy too, eg: to go with bangers and mash - gives a rich taste.

    If I needed a whole (or most of ) a bottle for cooking I would still use something that was at least drinkable (after all you don't want to add a whole bottle of vinegar to your food!) but never anything expensive! I always taste it first, also to check if it's corked (off).

    Agree with the 2 comments above - if it's too foul to drink it's not going to do your food any favours!
    "The happiest of people don't necessarily have the
    best of everything; they just make the best
    of everything that comes along their way."
    -- Author Unknown --
  • tootles
    • #5
    • 20th Aug 05, 5:37 PM
    • #5
    • 20th Aug 05, 5:37 PM
    I use red wine to put in Spag Bol, the gravy for Lamb, sausages and anything with beef in it, also for pork chops. white wine for chicken, anything from Tesco thats around 2.79 - 3.00 a bottle, we usually drink it with the meal, you can use a splash of brandy with chicken if you are desperate and I cook onions with white wine, it caramalises wonderfully.

    Asti spumate can be used with gelatine to make a jelly for fresh peaches that have been lightly cooked in syrup to make an excellent fruit jelly, brandy and black pepper with strawberries and of course pears poached in red wine and allowed to go cold delicious...........
    • jenster
    • By jenster 2nd Sep 07, 5:45 AM
    • 483 Posts
    • 759 Thanks
    jenster
    • #6
    • 2nd Sep 07, 5:45 AM
    good cheap wine for cooking?
    • #6
    • 2nd Sep 07, 5:45 AM
    hello all

    wanted to ask whats the best "cheapest wine for cooking"

    just to make spag bols ect

    what wine do u all use ?
  • odds-n-sods
    • #7
    • 2nd Sep 07, 6:33 AM
    • #7
    • 2nd Sep 07, 6:33 AM
    only advice I can give you is to use a wine you would drink, if you wouldn't drink it, don't cook with it, whatever you make will taste worse than if you hadn't added it.



    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 2nd Sep 07, 10:26 AM
    • 9,089 Posts
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    thriftlady
    • #8
    • 2nd Sep 07, 10:26 AM
    • #8
    • 2nd Sep 07, 10:26 AM
    I tend to use cider more than wine. I use a good quality one but even so it is much cheaper than wine -and has the added bonus of being locally produced. It works really well in all those French classics like boeuf bourgignon (except you have to change the name )

    If I want to add a splash of wineyness to a spag bol I use dry sherry- just an own brand bottle. I also use vermouth for risottos and things that need a splash of white wine. Both sherry and vermouth can be stored after they've been opened. A disadvantage of a bottle of wine for me is that I'd drink the rest -no self discipline

    When I really want some wine in a dish I buy one of those cans- not the best quality but I'vealways had good results.

    HTH
    • lynzpower
    • By lynzpower 2nd Sep 07, 10:29 AM
    • 24,745 Posts
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    lynzpower
    • #9
    • 2nd Sep 07, 10:29 AM
    • #9
    • 2nd Sep 07, 10:29 AM
    I find the tescos soave ( white) at 2.50 a bottle lovely both for cooking & drinking good for sauces with chicken/ turkey etc
    Well aint funny how its the little things in life that mean the most? Not where you live, the car you drive or the price tag on your clothes.
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    So if you agree have a drink with me, raise your glasses for a toast
  • DrFluffy
    only advice I can give you is to use a wine you would drink, if you wouldn't drink it, don't cook with it, whatever you make will taste worse than if you hadn't added it.
    Originally posted by odds-n-sods
    Couldn't agree more. That said, I usually only use whatever wine is half price in Tescos!
    April Grocery Challenge 81/120
    • Newgirl
    • By Newgirl 2nd Sep 07, 10:52 AM
    • 363 Posts
    • 375 Thanks
    Newgirl
    I use anything I would drink but I never buy wine just for cooking.

    I don't drink it very often and, typically, there will be some left in a bottle. So the best thing to do is freeze it in ice cube trays (you can pop it out and into food bags or a container when frozen) and use that for cooking. Saves waste and stops you drinking a bottle in one sitting when you know you really shouldn't! Helps when I have red wine, as there is usually only me drinks it. OH will occasionally have a glass of white.

    Hope that helps

    Newgirl
    • Mine's a guinness
    • By Mine's a guinness 2nd Sep 07, 11:07 AM
    • 122 Posts
    • 98 Thanks
    Mine's a guinness
    I had a couple of bottles of mulled wine left over from Christmas and added half a bottle to a beef stew. Tasted great - must be the fruit and spices in it.
  • Garnet_Gem
    If I've not got a bottle opened, I buy a little bottle of red or white depending what I need for cooking. Lidls have them for 1.19. I can't tell whether it's a good or cheap wine in the dish.
    • paddy's mum
    • By paddy's mum 2nd Sep 07, 11:16 AM
    • 3,722 Posts
    • 13,410 Thanks
    paddy's mum
    I don't bother putting wine into the food I cook. I prefer to put it directly into the cook!
    • Seakay
    • By Seakay 2nd Sep 07, 11:28 AM
    • 4,173 Posts
    • 10,055 Thanks
    Seakay
    I keep a bottle in the fridge into which I decant any half inches of wine which gets left in the bottle, fine for slow cooked stews, spag bol etc. If the fridge bottle is empty then I use a bit of a bottle I'd like to drink, or if it's for somethin where I need a lot, then I get a cheap bottle (cheapest I can find). Chefs etc always say use the best wine you can afford in cooking, but I honestly can't tell the difference. the only time that I have bought something 'special' to cook with was when a specific sort of white wine was required for a dessert - even then it wasn't much because I went and got a mini bottle (you can get them from Morrisons, M&S and other places as well I expect) ad the are very useful for the sort of recipe that requires a glass or so of something specific.
    • JoeyEmma
    • By JoeyEmma 2nd Sep 07, 11:45 AM
    • 914 Posts
    • 1,499 Thanks
    JoeyEmma
    I was in Italy this summer and they sell wine in Tetrapack cartons for about 1.20 Euros for 75cl. It made me think about how much duty we pay on a bottle of wine.
  • odds-n-sods
    Seakay, if you get a really cheap bottle of wine and its a very sour, vinegarry type, even if its not gone off, you will be able to tell the difference in the food.



    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 2nd Sep 07, 12:15 PM
    • 13,149 Posts
    • 9,492 Thanks
    Debt_Free_Chick
    only advice I can give you is to use a wine you would drink, if you wouldn't drink it, don't cook with it, whatever you make will taste worse than if you hadn't added it.
    Originally posted by odds-n-sods
    I know this is supposed to be the case, but I can honestly say that I've never noticed a difference. I put the dregs from all sorts of different wines into an old wine vinegar bottle and just slosh some of that in

    It really shouldn't make a lot of difference to a robust dish like bolognaise (ragu) or borguignon as there's plenty of flavour without the wine and the wine simply adds a "depth".

    I wonder if this advice is given so as to avoid some of the "blended" wines of dubious quality? :confused: There are some very reasonable wines, sometimes from a single grape variety, which should be perfectly adequate. I certainly wouldn't slosh a glass of a chateau-bottled Bordeaux or Burgundy in to a Spag Bol
    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 2nd Sep 07, 12:17 PM
    • 13,149 Posts
    • 9,492 Thanks
    Debt_Free_Chick
    Seakay, if you get a really cheap bottle of wine and its a very sour, vinegarry type, even if its not gone off, you will be able to tell the difference in the food.
    Originally posted by odds-n-sods
    That's a fair point - although a "very sour, vinegary" taste would suggest that the wine is corked anyway. I'd be taking that back for a refund/replacement
  • krispyg76
    Does your nearest supermarket not sell small bottles of wine, you know the ones about 1.50 for 250ml size?

    They tend to be pretty decent and well known brands.
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