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  • rchddap1
    • #2
    • 17th Aug 05, 2:31 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Aug 05, 2:31 PM
    My Dad has a thing for making sloe gin...no-one else gets a look in.
    Baby Year 1: Oh dear...on the move

    Lily contracted Strep B Meningitis Dec 2006 Now seemingly a normal little monster.
    Love to my two angels that I will never forget.
  • ancasta
    • #3
    • 17th Aug 05, 2:32 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Aug 05, 2:32 PM
    My gran used to make a sauce out of them, very similar to cranberry sauce to serve with meat
    • se999
    • By se999 17th Aug 05, 2:34 PM
    • 2,404 Posts
    • 13,463 Thanks
    se999
    • #4
    • 17th Aug 05, 2:34 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Aug 05, 2:34 PM
    Well if you prefer vodka, Sloe Schnapps
    http://www.danish-schnapps-recipes.com/sloe.html
  • Turning_into_scrooge
    • #5
    • 17th Aug 05, 2:38 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Aug 05, 2:38 PM
    You can mke relly good wine with them, used to do it years ago. How about sloe jam, a bit like damson but slightly different
    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 17th Aug 05, 4:19 PM
    • 3,972 Posts
    • 7,504 Thanks
    culpepper
    • #6
    • 17th Aug 05, 4:19 PM
    • #6
    • 17th Aug 05, 4:19 PM
    yes I was going to say Sloe jam.Years ago,I found some and made loads of Jam with them.It was really nice.They are very sour which usually makes for very tasty jam.
  • krishna
    • #7
    • 21st Aug 05, 9:54 PM
    • #7
    • 21st Aug 05, 9:54 PM
    Recipes from "Farmhouse Fare"

    Not used the following recipes, but most of the recipes are good (though they may assume you have done similar things before).

    Sloe and Apple Jelly
    Stew equal quantites of ripe sloes and green apples (skins and cores included) until soft, barely covering the fruit in the stew-pan with water. Strain through a jelly-bag. To each pint of juice add 1lb of sugar. Bring to the boil and boil until a little sets when tested. This jelly has a piquant flavour quite its own and is delicious with mutton, hare or rabbit

    Sloe and apple cheese
    Make exactly as previous recipe, but put fruit through a sieve when cooked instead of through a jelly-bag. Add 14 oz of sugar to each pint of pulp.

    Sloe Jelly
    3lb sloes (very ripe)
    Sugar
    1lb apples

    Cover sloes and apples with water. Bring to boil and boil until fruit is soft. Strain. To every pint of liquid add 1 1/2 lbs sugar. Bring to boil. Boil gently until a trial sample skins over. Be careful not to boil too long, as the extra sugar may make the jelly sugary.

    "Farmhouse Fare" is a brilliant cookbook with recipes from farmers' wives published in Farmhouse Weekly - many are wartime ones. I have an old one from the 40s, but as far as I know it is still published; the new one being the same as the original edition, but with a few added recipes)

    Krishna
    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 22nd Aug 05, 11:56 AM
    • 13,149 Posts
    • 9,492 Thanks
    Debt_Free_Chick
    • #8
    • 22nd Aug 05, 11:56 AM
    • #8
    • 22nd Aug 05, 11:56 AM
    I make sloe gin or sloe vodka. Then, when I strain the berries (years later) I add them to a game casserole for some extra oomph.

    Very OS, getting double use out of one "product"
    • Sarahsaver
    • By Sarahsaver 22nd Aug 05, 12:00 PM
    • 8,219 Posts
    • 13,174 Thanks
    Sarahsaver
    • #9
    • 22nd Aug 05, 12:00 PM
    • #9
    • 22nd Aug 05, 12:00 PM
    let small children try them whilst you arm yourself with a camera to capture the faces they will pull
    Member no.1 of the 'I'm not in a clique' group
    I have done reading too!
    To avoid all evil, to do good,
    to purify the mind- that is the
    teaching of the Buddhas.
  • Littlebean
    Uses for Sloe's
    Anyone got any uses for sloe berries apart from Sloe Gin (don't like gin). There are loads on the hedgerows around here and I would love to be able to use them if possible.
    • Pink.
    • By Pink. 12th Sep 06, 11:35 AM
    • 17,431 Posts
    • 40,365 Thanks
    Pink.
    Hello Littlebean,

    Welcome to MSE and in particular to the Old Style board.

    Some of the replies on this older thread might give you some ideas: What can you do with sloe berries?

    Pink
    • mrs baggins
    • By mrs baggins 12th Sep 06, 11:41 AM
    • 1,275 Posts
    • 642 Thanks
    mrs baggins
    you can always make sloe gin but use vodka instead-if that makes sense!
  • doddsy
    I picked 14lbs on Saturday afternoon, they will be made into Sloe Gin. I would say it's worth trying because it doesn't taste like gin once it's infused for a few months with plenty of sugar. Gorgeous!!

    doddsy
    We must not, in trying to think about how we can make a big difference, ignore the small daily differences we can make which, over time, add up to big differences that we often cannot foresee.
    Marian Wright Edelman
    • spendingmad
    • By spendingmad 12th Aug 07, 1:50 PM
    • 483 Posts
    • 603 Thanks
    spendingmad
    Which berries are safe to eat
    Hi

    All this talk of blackberry vodka has made me go berry picking with my son.

    I found lots of brambles but no berries on them, have they been picked or just not ready yet? (We live in shropshire)

    Anyhow I did find some berries but not sure what they are, they look like blueberries but how can i be sure?

    The bush had small oval ish shaped leaves and the berries are 0.5cm

    Oh and I have just tryed to cut one in half and theres a stone in the middle so not a blueberry -

    Any ideas what they are?/ are they safe?/ what can i do with them?

    Thanks for your help sorry if I sound like a numpty!
  • CountryWife
    Hi spendingmad,
    Looks like you have found some sloes. They are the fruits of the blackthorn and are very sharp, so you cant eat them as they are but you can make sloe gin from them. You can also make them into a jelly to eat with cold meats.
    • spendingmad
    • By spendingmad 12th Aug 07, 2:26 PM
    • 483 Posts
    • 603 Thanks
    spendingmad
    Thanks Countrywife,
    I have a bottle of gin in the cupboard - will go and find a recipe - looks like Grandads christmas present is sorted Homemade Sloe Gin!
    • THIRZAH
    • By THIRZAH 12th Aug 07, 3:06 PM
    • 1,423 Posts
    • 7,431 Thanks
    THIRZAH
    If they are sloes it's probably a bit early to pick them.I think you are supposed to wait until after the first frost of the autumn which with the year we've been having probably won't be long now!

    You should still be able to find blackberries. I live in North Derbyshire and my cultivated blackberries have only just started to ripen and wild ones are usually a bit later .

    Wild blueberries or bilberries are found on very low bushes usually on the moors. You really have to search for the berries. They are tiny-smaller than the ones you buy in the shops. Four of us picked bilberries for over half an hour once and we ended up with 6 oz of fruit-just enough for one batch of muffins!
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 12th Aug 07, 3:10 PM
    • 9,089 Posts
    • 28,909 Thanks
    thriftlady
    They do indeed sound like sloes or bullaces (wild plum). It is too early yet to pick them for gin. My books tell me you should wait till after the first frost as that breaks the tough skins and allows the gin to permeate them. Trouble is, if you wait that long the birds will have had them. I'm wondering if you can acheive the same effect by freezing them.

    Damsons are great for gin too
    • Penelope Penguin
    • By Penelope Penguin 12th Aug 07, 4:03 PM
    • 17,087 Posts
    • 132,754 Thanks
    Penelope Penguin
    They do indeed sound like sloes or bullaces (wild plum). It is too early yet to pick them for gin. My books tell me you should wait till after the first frost as that breaks the tough skins and allows the gin to permeate them. Trouble is, if you wait that long the birds will have had them. I'm wondering if you can acheive the same effect by freezing them.

    Damsons are great for gin too
    Originally posted by thriftlady
    Sound like sloes to me, too. I agree, it's too early to pick them, though round here, there's a good crop, so should be plenty for the birds and you, too. Brambles are coming ripe here, atm, and the crop is good.

    When I first made sloe gin, I was advised to slit the skins with a pin to allow the gin to get in. Fiddly job, and took ages. Now I just wash, dry, and stick them in a freezer bag. Freeze for a few days, then add to the gin - works like a dream, and the gin starts to take on colour straight away.

    Enjoy your gin - it should be ready in time for Christmas.

    Penny. x
    Sheep, pigs, hens and bees on our Teesdale smallholding
    • spendingmad
    • By spendingmad 12th Aug 07, 6:13 PM
    • 483 Posts
    • 603 Thanks
    spendingmad
    Thank you all for your help! The bushes are only across the way from our house so will be across there come the autumn! xx
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