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  • FIRST POST
    Louisa
    Recipe for stuffed heart please anyone?
    • #1
    • 17th Aug 05, 9:00 AM
    Recipe for stuffed heart please anyone? 17th Aug 05 at 9:00 AM
    Yep I know it might sound a little gruesome but my mum used to make it, absolutely delicious! And v cheap, picked up a pack of two in the reduced section at sainsburys a while ago for 47p. They have been lurking in the freezer for a while and now I am trying to save some cash seriously (rather than half-heartedly!) thought it was about time I put them to good use.

    Can anyone help with a recipe? Mum is on her hols so I could do with the collective wisdom of the OS Money Savers

    PS I do have a slow cooker if that will help in recipe suggestions
Page 1
  • tr3mor
    • #2
    • 17th Aug 05, 9:50 AM
    • #2
    • 17th Aug 05, 9:50 AM
    I've never tried heart, what does it taste like? i presume it's more like normal meat than liver/kidneys etc, because it's just one big muscle...?
    • Rikki
    • By Rikki 17th Aug 05, 9:57 AM
    • 20,648 Posts
    • 21,773 Thanks
    Rikki
    • #3
    • 17th Aug 05, 9:57 AM
    • #3
    • 17th Aug 05, 9:57 AM
    I love hearts. I put stuffing inside mine and cook them slowly in a caserol dish in the oven.
  • MrsB
    • #4
    • 17th Aug 05, 10:35 AM
    • #4
    • 17th Aug 05, 10:35 AM
    How about this one:

    http://radstock4u.com/lifestyle/recipes/radstock4u_recipe_004.htm

    Never eaten heart myself so have no clue if it's any good, but sounds quite nice.
    I'd rather be a could-be if I cannot be an are; because a could-be is a maybe who is reaching for a star. I'd rather be a has-been than a might-have-been, by far; for a might have-been has never been, but a has was once an are Milton Berle
    • se999
    • By se999 17th Aug 05, 10:53 AM
    • 2,404 Posts
    • 13,463 Thanks
    se999
    • #5
    • 17th Aug 05, 10:53 AM
    • #5
    • 17th Aug 05, 10:53 AM
    Hi,

    6 heart recipes here, including 2 for stuffed heart, hope one's like your mum's

    http://www.cookitsimply.com/offal/heart-recipes-0020-01f50.html

    Edit - Thanks for doing this post, discovered DS1 has eaten heart in Thailand, so he's off to Uni with the heart recipes for cheap student meals.
    Last edited by se999; 17-08-2005 at 11:50 AM.
  • Louisa
    • #6
    • 17th Aug 05, 5:35 PM
    • #6
    • 17th Aug 05, 5:35 PM
    I've never tried heart, what does it taste like? i presume it's more like normal meat than liver/kidneys etc, because it's just one big muscle...?
    by tr3mor
    Do you know tr3mor I really cant remember what it tasted like, just remembered loving it! But I don't remember it being quite so dense and "offal-y" as liver etc.

    Thanks for the ideas everyone- Rikki do you add any liquid to the casserole dish when you prepare them? And is it just normal stuffing like you'd do for a chicken?

    And love the cookitsimply website, thankyou
  • competitionscafe
    • #7
    • 17th Aug 05, 9:18 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Aug 05, 9:18 PM
    I tried lambs heart years ago when we had to make it for a college course - was surprised by how nice it was as I don't usually like offal (especially tripe -yuck!!)

    Can recommend ox tail too (although not sure if that's really offal?) it is very cheap though - cook it slowly, wonderful winter food.
    "The happiest of people don't necessarily have the
    best of everything; they just make the best
    of everything that comes along their way."
    -- Author Unknown --
  • competitionscafe
    • #8
    • 18th Aug 05, 1:04 AM
    • #8
    • 18th Aug 05, 1:04 AM
    From the famous St John Bar and Restaurant, 26 St John Street, London EC1 (020 7251 0848) Recipe taken from Nose to Tail Eating.

    Stuffed lamb's heart
    serves 6

    6 lambs' hearts (make sure they are intact, with a hole only at the top)
    18 rashers of streaky bacon
    1.1 litres chicken stock
    stuffing
    duck fat or butter
    4 red onions, peeled and sliced
    4 bulbs of garlic, peeled and chopped
    2 large glasses red wine
    225g yesterday's white bread, with crusts off, cubed
    sea salt and pepper
    half a bunch of sage, leaves only, chopped

    First make the stuffing. In a pan with duck fat or butter cook your onions and garlic gently so that they do not colour but become soft and giving. Add the wine, let this reduce by half, then add the bread, season, and cook together gently for 15 minutes: if it appears too dry add a splash more wine. Cool then add the sage.

    Meanwhile trim the hearts of any excess fat nodules at their openings and any obvious sinews, and the flap at the top. Finally, with your finger, scoop out any blood clots at the base of the ventricles. You are ready to stuff.

    With your hand, press the stuffing into the heart, and level off the opening at the top. Then drape 3 rashers of bacon over the exposed stuffing in a star fashion forming a lid and secure with string.

    Find an oven dish or deep roasting tray in which the hearts will fit snugly; stand them upright. Pour stock over - they do not need to be completely covered. Cover with tinfoil and place in a medium oven for 2? hours. When cooked remove and keep warm. Strain the juice and then reduce by half for a delicious sauce. Untie and serve with mashed swede.

    ---

    another recipe (not from St John's):

    Roast Stuffed Lambs' Hearts

    Serves 4

    Ingredients:

    50g/2oz Button Mushrooms, chopped
    2 Sticks Celery, chopped
    25g/2oz Butter
    25g/1oz Walnuts, chopped
    1 tbsp Fresh Parsley, chopped
    Salt and Pepper
    4 Lambs' Hearts
    2 tbsp Oil

    Instructions

    1. Melt the butter in pan, add the mushrooms and celery and fry for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and add breadcrumbs, walnuts, parsley and seasoning. Mix well and leave to cool.

    2. Preheat the oven to 180C, 350F Gas mark 4. Prepare hearts, using kitchen scissors to cut through the pockets inside to make room for the stuffing. Wash and dry well.

    3. Stuff the hearts with the mushroom mixture and sew up with a trussing needle and thread, or fasten with skewers.

    4. Melt the oil in a roasting tin and add hearts. Baste well and cook in the centre of the oven for 45 minutes. Turn hearts over and baste. Cook for a further 45 minutes until tender.

    5. To serve - remove the string or skewers and serve immediately.

    >>
  • stockmarket-diva
    • #9
    • 18th Aug 05, 8:47 AM
    • #9
    • 18th Aug 05, 8:47 AM
    This is one of my favourites too....really hard to get hold of hearts I find. Anyway, this recipie is really rich and gorgeous and yet so simple.

    Stuff hearts with stuffing mix (I often just use sage and onion stuffing mix). Put in casserole dish and make up stock with just marmite and hot water and almost cover the hearts. Put lid on and put in oven 160 degrees for about 2 and a half hours ( a slow cooker would probably work). The stuffing and the consistency of the hearts somehow thicken the gravy and it is really rich and gorgeous.

    Hope you like.
  • scuzz
    This is one of my favourites too....really hard to get hold of hearts I find. Anyway, this recipie is really rich and gorgeous and yet so simple.

    Stuff hearts with stuffing mix (I often just use sage and onion stuffing mix). Put in casserole dish and make up stock with just marmite and hot water and almost cover the hearts. Put lid on and put in oven 160 degrees for about 2 and a half hours ( a slow cooker would probably work). The stuffing and the consistency of the hearts somehow thicken the gravy and it is really rich and gorgeous.

    Hope you like.
    by stockmarket-diva
    With you all the way on this. I love hearts
    Comping, Clicking & Saving for Change
  • Simba_25
    Cooking Heart????
    hiya,

    i need to cook a heart! and i havnt a clue how to do it, anyone got the know how??

    I got a new puppy yesterday and the previous owner gave me some of his food to last the weekend which included a heart but it needs cooking up.

    any help much appreciated
    thank you linzi xx
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 24th Sep 05, 8:52 AM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    There's a stuffed heart recipe in our collection.

    Edit: It's for people! Silly me!!
    Last edited by squeaky; 24-09-2005 at 9:43 AM.
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    • se999
    • By se999 24th Sep 05, 9:05 AM
    • 2,404 Posts
    • 13,463 Thanks
    se999
    Hi,

    There was a thread here on Old Style with human recipes

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.html?t=82541&highlight=heart

    But for doggy recipes for a young puppy, I'd give the previous owners a ring, you want to cook it the same way, as sometimes a change of food can upset their stomaches. Also not sure what size you'd need to cut it up into or mince it, it depends on the size and age of the puppy.
    • Curry Queen
    • By Curry Queen 24th Sep 05, 9:20 AM
    • 5,482 Posts
    • 3,081 Thanks
    Curry Queen
    Not sure a puppy would fancy that recipe squeaky


    I would just boil it up in a little water, nothing added, but it might be better to call the previous owners to check how they did it so you know he'll eat it! The stress of moving home may well put him off his food for a day or so anyway so if you can make it just how he's used to haivng it then it will help
    Last edited by Curry_Queen; 24-09-2005 at 9:23 AM.
    "An Ye Harm None, Do What Ye Will"
    ~
    It is that what you do, good or bad,
    will come back to you three times as strong!

  • Simba_25
    pmsl!

    thanks guys, i gave him a call and it was just boiled. but ive since been advised by the pet shop not to give him it as he is still too young and he will be getting too much protein as the previous owner was also giving him adult food!

    thanks anyhow tho xx
  • Jay-Jay
    pmsl!

    thanks guys, i gave him a call and it was just boiled. but ive since been advised by the pet shop not to give him it as he is still too young and he will be getting too much protein as the previous owner was also giving him adult food!

    thanks anyhow tho xx
    by Simba_25

    My Mum and Dad feed their dogs on fresh meat though they're adults. They roast heart in the oven, fry beef mince until it's half cooked and microwave liver or feed it raw.

    They also have cooked veg, pasta and rice along with normal dog biscuits.

    Bear in mind that your local pet shop will want you to buy food from them so although your pup may be too young for the heart, 'proper' food is better for him than tinned or processed stuff.
    Just run, run and keep on running!

    • se999
    • By se999 25th Sep 05, 5:59 AM
    • 2,404 Posts
    • 13,463 Thanks
    se999
    Hi,

    Found the PDSA website, thought they may have ideas on dog and puppy care, here's the link to the main dog/puppy page.

    http://www.pdsa.org.uk/pages/page03_1.cfm

    It advises tinned puppy food, and also says how many meals a day they need at what ages.

    Also advises doggy toothbrushing routine from day one!! Keeps their teeth healthy, and less likely to get doggy bad breath from bad teeth when older. Nicer for you and your pet.
    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 25th Sep 05, 6:27 AM
    • 13,149 Posts
    • 9,492 Thanks
    Debt_Free_Chick
    Dogs, including puppies, will eat raw meat and suffer no ill-effects. In fact, as carnivores, they "naturally" eat raw. My pup (7 months old) eats raw chicken carcasses as the basis of his diet.

    You can feed the heart to the pup, raw and roughly chopped. But if you do this, do so in place of his normal meal and not in addition to it.

    Incidentally, feeding meaty bones such as chicken carcasses, is nature's way of keeping the dog's teeth clean. All that chewing means the bones act as a kind of toothbrush!

    At the end of the day, you either have to rely on commercial dog food, either dry (kibble) or tinned ... or do your own research on raw food diets. However, a dog fed on commercial food could be given the occasional raw food treat, in place of its normal meal. Dogs will also eat raw eggs and raw fish. Some will eat pureed raw vegetables although it's not a nutritional "must have" in a dog's diet.

    HTH
    Last edited by Debt_Free_Chick; 25-09-2005 at 6:31 AM.
  • jennybb
    Ox Heart??? Ideas anyone please
    :confused:

    I have just bought some because it was cheap, but have never used it before. Does anyone have any tasty suggestions? Should it be slow cooked or quick?

    I'm being too lazy to scour through my mountain of cookbooks!

    Thanks
    • recovering spendaholic
    • By recovering spendaholic 7th Oct 06, 3:53 PM
    • 3,049 Posts
    • 15,426 Thanks
    recovering spendaholic
    We used to have this when money was tight when I was a little girl. I remember my Dad soaking it in milk for a few hours to make it less bitter and then taking all the tubes and things out of the top and stuffing it with sage and onion stuffing. He then smeared it with butter, seasoned it, wrapped it in foil and roasted it slowly for a couple of hours. I remember it used to be like really tender beef, and we had it with yorkshire pudding, mushy peas, roast potatoes and carrot and swede mash and gravy. We often used to have lambs hearts too - again soaked first and then stuffed but cooked in stock with sliced onions in. When they were braised he used to thicken the stock to make gravy and we had them with mash.
    Jane

    ENDIS. Employed, no disposable income or savings!
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