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  • FIRST POST
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 12th Jun 18, 12:39 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    Prepping for Brexit thread
    • #1
    • 12th Jun 18, 12:39 PM
    Prepping for Brexit thread 12th Jun 18 at 12:39 PM
    Hi guys
    Iím pretty well resolved to the fact that Brexit is going to affect us all. I donít want this thread to be a good or bad, right or wrong type thing.
    Just a positive, what can we prepare to make life easier, less expensive, less disruptive when it does happen.

    My aims are to stock up on items I think are going to get more expensive. Also to try and save up an emergency fund ( that will be slow going as OH took early retirement due to illness) and Iím unemployed at the moment.

    So my aims are to work out what items need to be stocked up
    To look for a job
    To live as frugally as possible while eating healthily
    To make sure the savings we have already donít get touched

    So guys please feel free to join in and list anything you think may be affected. Or just to comment. That way we can help each other.

    Hope to hear from you all soon
    Cuddles
Page 1
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 12th Jun 18, 1:20 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    • #2
    • 12th Jun 18, 1:20 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Jun 18, 1:20 PM
    Hi guys

    Currently I!!!8217;m working my way through all the frozen veg in Mr T to see what is nice frozen and what really needs to be fresh. Broccoli and cauliflower is ok but a bit droopy frozen, but with gravy or cheese sauce or made into soup is fine when fresh is too expensive. Potatoes dont seem to be the good value fillers they used to be so pasta and rice will need to be stocked up on when on offer. Salad veg will be replaced with cooked veg in winter and more veggie meals if meat goes even more expensive.
    OH and I are both ok for summer clothes and I volunteer two days a week in one of our local CS so will keep a look out for jumpers for both of us. But only if we really need will I be buying until I have built up more savings. I work on the theory that I should only buy what we need because others might need those items too.
    Better go and get some jobs done
    Speak again soon
    Cuddles
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 12th Jun 18, 2:56 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    • #3
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:56 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:56 PM
    What a sensible idea for a thread topic!


    I decided when we got the Yes vote on Brexit to look out and write down recipes for pulse based and veggie pottages and stew type meals and to start working them in to our diet now before it happens so not only do we get used to the different style of eating gradually but our digestive systems are broken in gently to the extra fibre in that diet. I found several recipes that we really enjoy too and it helps to keep housekeeping costs lower as well.


    We are hopefully moving to a new house in the not too distant future and part of preparing for Brexit will be to have anything that is needed done before it happens so that we start with a sound dwelling and a sound heating system. We are going to have a wood stove put in as we have an open chimney there and we have a wood stove here which is a comforting part of winter life. I'm going to make sure the new one has either an oven or cooking plates (or both if I can find one) so that if gas/electricity become vastly more expensive we will use the stove when it's running to cook our hot meals. I have an inset stove here with only a narrow shelf to cook on but have even managed soda bread in a rectangular mess tin on this successfully.

    We've invested in good outdoor clothing, I got some real goose down coats when on trips to the continent and have invested in some good quality waterproof and windproof lined trousers. I already have a couple of pairs of good boots with good sturdy soles that can cope with snow and ice. and sheepskin hat, gloves and a coney fur scarf all of which are toasty when it's arctic.

    Brexit is such an unknown quantity without anything concrete to go on that I'm waiting on many things until I see just exactly what does happen. I have always tried to be prepared for untoward events, I'm a regular on the prepping thread and much of what I already do will cover Brexit and post Brexit events too. You may find some helpful ideas over there that will help you make your 'to do' list.

    I ought to have said we already have an outdoor wood burner called an OzPig which we use in the warmer weather and it runs on any wood you have available, lots of wood we've burned in it has come from beach combing after a high tide (not by us but by a friend's Labrador who brings it home with him) but we also use scrap wood that we get from processing wood we 'womble' for the indoor stove. It will be useful if utilities really do get expensive.
    Last edited by MrsLurcherwalker; 12-06-2018 at 3:15 PM.
    You've always had the power my dear, you just had to learn it for yourself!

    Ours is not to wonder what is fair in life but finding what may be, make it up fair to our needs.
    • Cappella
    • By Cappella 12th Jun 18, 7:38 PM
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    Cappella
    • #4
    • 12th Jun 18, 7:38 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Jun 18, 7:38 PM
    Ive just posted this on the prepping thread, but it is equally applicable here. I Have been thinking about the consequences if Brexit ever since the referendum result, and decided that prepping will continue as usual, with a higher focus on possible higher prices. So I am concentrating on making sure that, as always here, the and freezer are well stocked. It will be easier and cheaper to replace one or two items a week as you use them, before prices soar than to try to establish well stocked cupboards after that has happened.
    I am also trying to ensure that the allotment is as productive as possible, and that surplus crops are frozen, pickled and preserved to minimise waste. that the allotment is as productive as possible.
    MrC has just taken off 80lbs of honey and the hens are laying well - bit too well - so I think whatever happens we will be ok. For a while now we have been focusing on eating seasonally and traditionally, ( think 1950s, 60s 70s )and having no food waste. I have plenty of frugal recipes under my belt, which will be very useful if food prices really soar.
    As far as Brexit is concerned I am just hoping for the best really but also trying to anticipate the worst.
    Last edited by Cappella; 12-06-2018 at 8:31 PM.
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 12th Jun 18, 10:45 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 18, 10:45 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 18, 10:45 PM
    Hi Mrs Lurcherwalker and Cappella
    We have already downsized and are now mortgage free in a cute little one bedroom flat. It costs next to nothing to heat and has a lovely sea view (which I love every time I open the blinds)
    I plan to stock the freezer to bursting point and then stock up on tins and dried food. I try to buy British food wherever possible but our budget doesn!!!8217;t always allow it.
    I think that when Brexit day arrives that there may be shortages due to lorries backing up at the ferry ports in the short term until customs sort themselves out. Also the chaotic way the government is dealing with the Brexit talks I have no faith that all will be hunkydory afterwards. If I have stores in I can always use them up if I!!!8217;m wrong.
    When I do my Mr T shop I look at the place each item comes from eg coffee, tea, sugar etc and will stock up things that can!!!8217;t be grown in the uk first.
    Also we can!!!8217;t trust that fuel will always be readily available so there may be power cuts, fuel shortages etc if the powers that be in other countries don!!!8217;t want to trade with us. So extra blankets, candles etc are always useful, as is always keeping some fuel in the car. A little bit of cash in the house is also needed I feel as cash machines don!!!8217;t work without electric and also computer systems at various banks have failed recently.
    A lot of this is common sense and just takes a little thought and forward planning.
    I!!!8217;ll pop by regularly with my progress
    Cuddles
    • Gspree
    • By Gspree 12th Jun 18, 11:19 PM
    • 20 Posts
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    Gspree
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 18, 11:19 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 18, 11:19 PM
    And perhaps some commodities would become cheaper... you mentioned rice etc, in what scenario would leaving the eu push up the cost of rice?
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 12th Jun 18, 11:40 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    • #7
    • 12th Jun 18, 11:40 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Jun 18, 11:40 PM
    Hi Gspree
    I!!!8217;m working on the theory that anything that comes from abroad might cost more due to not having the trade deals with Europe anymore so it might cost more to import.
    It might be that some things are cheaper and that we can get better deals alone but at the moment just don!!!8217;t know.
    Cuddles
    • Hopeless Case
    • By Hopeless Case 13th Jun 18, 5:36 AM
    • 942 Posts
    • 5,829 Thanks
    Hopeless Case
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 18, 5:36 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 18, 5:36 AM
    Hi Gspree
    I!!!8217;m working on the theory that anything that comes from abroad might cost more due to not having the trade deals with Europe anymore so it might cost more to import.
    It might be that some things are cheaper and that we can get better deals alone but at the moment just don!!!8217;t know.
    Cuddles
    Originally posted by cuddlymarm
    I agree with that, possible consequences of losing the clout/bargaining power of being in a huge market like the EU and having to pay extra/higher tariffs for being outside the collective agreements. I think it would be being outside the trade deals the EU has with the countries the rice comes from

    I'm no expert but I can't see how things like rice could become cheaper, I just hope they stay the same/don't increase too much - fingers crossed
    Last edited by Hopeless Case; 13-06-2018 at 5:52 AM.
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    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 13th Jun 18, 7:31 AM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 18, 7:31 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 18, 7:31 AM
    I'm trying to wean us off the freezer as a way of storage, IF and it is only an if, we get fairly frequent disruptions to the power supply for any of a number of reasons that spring to mind it might mean spoilage of frozen stocks depending on the frequency and duration of the power outs. That would cost money that I'm rather inclined to put into different ways of storage. We have a dehydrator which is a very efficient way of storing fresh fruit and veg without the need for electricity as they keep for literally years in a sealed dry jar, yes it costs on electricity to dry the produce in the first place but the drying is effective even with the odd gap if the machine is off, the food still stays good. I'm also investing in kilner type jars for bottling fruit (haven't done meat or veg both of which are a potential source of botulism unless done correctly) and I do have a pressure canner, as yet untested in which I could feasibly can meat and veg as you need to get it to the right temperature for safety and it's difficult just on the hob. I make jams, jellies and pickles and chutneys too all of which store on a shelf. I'm lucky in having space for that type of storage and it might be difficult in a small flat but you could follow Grey Queen and store under beds etc. and behind sofas etc. so it's out of sight and not cluttering up your nice living areas. I also take advantage of seasonal items like elderflowers and elderberries in particular to make cordials and fruit vinegars which can be used for drinks, hot medicinal drinks and poured over ice cream or sponge puddings as a sauce. All helps keep the wolf from the door!
    You've always had the power my dear, you just had to learn it for yourself!

    Ours is not to wonder what is fair in life but finding what may be, make it up fair to our needs.
    • grunnie
    • By grunnie 13th Jun 18, 8:15 AM
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    grunnie
    Great idea for a thread. I have 2 huge freezers and a store cupboard as though I was laying in for a siege. I also have a huge garden think allotment size or even larger. I grow loads of fruit and veg and freeze loads so they last for a whole year. I still have apples from last year stored carefully in the garage. I had a bramble ( from freezer) and apple crumble yesterday. Yummy. I made white currant jelly this week and it is a great pink colour and lovely served with cheese and crackers.
    Herring is just coming in to season and I buy 10 packs of 3 and put them into the freezer my local fish shop vacuum packs them for me.

    I buy milk from Tescos at £1.09 and the same size and make is £1.20 in the local farm shop. Last week we were on holiday on the west coast of Scotland and the very same make and size of milk was £1.83 ouch now that is painful. Delivery costs.

    I am not scared of Brexit but terrified of Scottish independence maybe some of you could send me food parcels then.
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 13th Jun 18, 12:39 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    Hi guys
    I didnít think about Scottish independence but as soon as Brexit happens Nicola Sturgeon ( sorry if I spelt that wrong) will be pushing for another referendum. I think we live in unsettled times and all we can do is ready ourselves as much as possible for the outcome.

    I hadnít thought of the effects of power cuts on freezer stocks but if freezers are outside or in an area that can be aired out maybe a small generator might be useful. Not for inside though because of the carbon monoxide they give off is deadly. We only have a fridge freezer and no room for anything bigger so a lot of my food will be canned and dried anyway.

    Today all meals are from what I have in, hopefully tomorrow too. We are both doing slimming world which is good, basic meals.

    I also do my main shop with Mr T and get it delivered so add to it as needed then go through it with a fine tooth comb to make sure that Iím not buying anything not needed/ too expensive. Also that way nothing finds its way into my trolley like biscuits or cake. The frugal me has the midweek delivery saver so it costs very little to get it delivered.

    Itís lovely that others are getting prepared for Brexit too. Other people ideas are so helpful in saving money and managing if or when the effects kick in.

    Bye for now
    Cuddles
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 13th Jun 18, 1:22 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    This is the prepper in me talking Cuddles but if you watched the 'prepping' scenario programme that the BBC put out last year the guy who was the prepper on that thought he was fine but was the only person running a generator in the whole area so everyone else who hadn't food/electricity went and took all he and his family had so carefully prepared with, leaving them with nothing in a very difficult situation. Generators are loud and distinctive sounding so everyone will know you have food in your freezer and if desperate enough will not hesitate to take it from you by any means available. Better by far to have stores that are silent and not advertise that you have them because that way you stand a better chance of keeping and using them yourselves.
    You've always had the power my dear, you just had to learn it for yourself!

    Ours is not to wonder what is fair in life but finding what may be, make it up fair to our needs.
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 13th Jun 18, 1:47 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    True Mrs Lurcherwalker
    We were in Florida a couple of years ago when there was a hurricane coming, luckily we were missed but the supermarket was picked clean ( my OH went in and the most prim and proper ladies were arguing about the last tins on the shelf) It definately brings out the worst in people. If you are hungry cold baked beans or rice pud will keep the wolf from the door.

    We have a bed with space for storing cans and the like which will become useful if needed. We!!!8217;ve only been in our tiny flat for just over a year but as new furniture etc is needed we are looking at storage options. We are saving up to redo the bathroom and the sink will have two nice big drawers underneath for storage. We!!!8217;ve also got shelves all round the top of the bedroom with pretty boxes with winter stuff in which will swap to summer when needed. We don!!!8217;t have much summer stuff to put away though because older t shirts go under jumpers rather than buying vests.

    I better go before I bore you all silly
    Cuddles
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 13th Jun 18, 1:51 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    GQ has flat bed wooden trolleys on little wheels that are easy to push under and pull out from under the bed and stores tins on them, very canny and impossible to see when the bedding is in place, very canny lass! It's NOT boring pet, it's common sense to think about what might happen and if possible be a couple of steps ahead of it with solutions!
    You've always had the power my dear, you just had to learn it for yourself!

    Ours is not to wonder what is fair in life but finding what may be, make it up fair to our needs.
    • C J
    • By C J 13th Jun 18, 2:19 PM
    • 1,280 Posts
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    C J
    I need to ask you seasoned preppers what you do about rotating any stored stock you have. During the bad snow earlier in the year, I stocked up on various things such as cartons of longlife milk - but their shelf life isn't forever. Should I keep things for a year (say) and use-then-replace them? I really don't want to have to live off longlife milk but equally I don't want to waste things! What do you all do?
    An ever-shifting labyrinth of chiaroscuro
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 13th Jun 18, 2:34 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    I write the use by date in permanent marker on the top and the front of the packaging and every 3 months or so I rearrange the shelves (because inevitably things get put at the front as they're purchased and put into store) and arrange things with the longest dates at the back of the shelves and the shortest at the front. I don't take too much notice of 'use before dates' as things are usually perfectly usable for long after that if they're in cans or jars. I'm currently using up tins from the store room and finding things that are labelled best before 2013 and as long as the tins haven't 'blown' (the ends bow out with pressure if the contents have gone off) and there are no dents and visible rust we're finding no detectable deterioration in anything. I'm using Mr Mash that was use by 2013 too and it tastes totally normal. I'm careful with fridge chilled things and do bide by use by dates there in the main and things surface from the depths of the freezer in various states and if it's too freezer burned I don't use it but if possible compost it if it's fruit and veg. Meat. fish etc. unfortunately has to go in the bin if it's too far gone or unidentifiable. We're getting rid of the huge chest freezer we've had for years, it's far too easy to lose things into the depths which then spoil and that's wasting money!
    You've always had the power my dear, you just had to learn it for yourself!

    Ours is not to wonder what is fair in life but finding what may be, make it up fair to our needs.
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 13th Jun 18, 2:38 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    Hi C J
    I move everything in the freezer down to the bottom as the new stuff arrives and eat from the bottom up. I also have a use now cupboard and a put stuff in for later cupboard, then move that across when new comes. I rotate every time I shop so that it only takes a couple of minutes if that makes sense but I!!!8217;ve not much storage space so when I put stuff under the bed I check the dates and keep a note of it.
    Cuddles
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 13th Jun 18, 4:09 PM
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    mardatha
    Fabulous thread thank you!
    Grunnie I havent a clue why you think independence would make anything already worse than it is. Scotland would get new trading partners and new deals in place - any country that has whisky and oil is never going to be stuck!
    Whoever it was who asked about longlife milk (CJ?) I use them up in milk puddings and baking.
    We already eat 1950s UK style - mainly because the wartime cookbooks recommended to me by people on the OS threads really work for me and taste like real food Those new books have recipes with 900 ingreds (and every single one has to be either wild or distressed or torn) drive me insane I know where I am with lamb hotpot or cottage pie.
    So what I'm going to try to do, health allowing, is to extend the veg garden by a good bit. I'm too high up to grow any fruit but berries, so I can plant some rasps and blackberries. Crumbles and pies from those. Already grow tatties and onions and leeks. Soups and fillers for stews from those 3 things.
    We're facing a huge drop in income and increasing frail health here so this thread couldn't have come at a better time
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th Jun 18, 5:11 PM
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    moneyistooshorttomention

    I am not scared of Brexit but terrified of Scottish independence maybe some of you could send me food parcels then.
    Originally posted by grunnie
    I am really glad to see someone "elsewhere in Britain" say that actually - now that I moved to Wales a few years ago - and then realised a lotta stuff one can't really see when living in England.

    So - yep....I'm actually more (a lot more!) concerned about the Nationalists managing to put even more of a wedge than they already have in between England and Wales and I fear for Scotland too because of the Nationalists. Wales is already a good bit poorer than England and really doesnt need their "helping hand" to become even poorer (re-phrase as "even more devolved government"). They can't see it - but I can....

    So - I've been making preps anyway (ie before I moved here). I've upped the ante on the preps after moving here and realising what was going on.

    So - I'm growing quite a bit of food by now in my garden and generally making my finances as "watertight" as possible and that will come in useful whatever happens. Be it Brexit or the Nationalists making Wales/Scotland even poorer with yet more "devolution". I'm prepared.

    It's been about 17 months now that the Northern Irish "devolved government" hasnt functioned for and I've got my hopes up that (once Brexit is more sorted and Theresa May doesnt need the backing of the most old-fashioned of the N. Irish political parties) she'll move to imposing the right to legal abortion for Northern Irish woman at last. Followed by that move being "thin end of wedge" and the whole idea of Northern Irish "devolved government" collapses for good - followed by Welsh and Scottish "devolved government". Fingers crossed that, come 10 years time, it will just be "Britain - as normal" again....and those "devolved governments" will be in the history books.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 13-06-2018 at 5:26 PM.
    • stoozie1
    • By stoozie1 13th Jun 18, 6:19 PM
    • 632 Posts
    • 583 Thanks
    stoozie1
    MITSTM, after the Brexit referendum you posted that people needed to accept the majority decision of the referendum. Surely this should also be the case regarding referenda about Welsh devolution.
    Save 12 k in 2018 challenge member #79
    Target 2018: 24k Jan 2018- £560 April £2670
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