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  • FIRST POST
    • Thell
    • By Thell 26th Feb 18, 9:16 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Thell
    Missed hospital appt due to train cancellation
    • #1
    • 26th Feb 18, 9:16 PM
    Missed hospital appt due to train cancellation 26th Feb 18 at 9:16 PM
    My other half had a hospital appointment at 5pm last Wednesday. She's been waiting six weeks for this. Hospital is 15 minutes walk from the train station at the end of the journey. We went to our local station to catch a train that would get us there 30 minutes before the appointment, giving us twice as long as we needed to walk. When we arrived at our local station we discovered that the train had been cancelled. The next train was also running late with the net result that we'd arrive at the hospital about 15 minutes late. We phoned the hospital as a courtesy to tell them this and they told us if we were more than ten minutes late they wouldn't see us and my other half would go back on the waiting list... another six week wait then! As it was physically impossible to get to the hospital less than 15 minutes late we abandoned our trip and got a refund from the ticket office. Given that my other half now has to wait another six weeks for the appointment and has had to postpone two further appointments as they required the results from this one to be available, all though no fault of her own, is there any comeback or is the fact that the tickets were refunded the best we can hope for?
Page 2
    • caronoel
    • By caronoel 1st Mar 18, 4:13 PM
    • 862 Posts
    • 1,106 Thanks
    caronoel
    Why should anyone be within ten minutes of an appointment that is likely going to be a 2 hour wait?

    The NHS is great but they should admit everything is running late and give you updates for when you should arrive. The appointment time is !!!!!!!! and you know it.

    For your reasoning to be effecticve the NHS should give compensation for appointments not on time. It goes both ways.

    Doesa depend on what the appointment was for of course. Some are4 always on time.
    Originally posted by Carrot007
    This is part of the problem with a free service like the NHS. If a patient had to pay even 10 for an appointment or 20 for a missed appointment, there would be a dramatic reduction in waiting times and a big boost to NHS finances

    Then, yes, we should have compensation for NHS delays as we do for train delays.

    The NHS is the last bastion of unreformed socialism - run for the benefit of staff rather than patients
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 1st Mar 18, 4:16 PM
    • 2,970 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    Comms69
    This is part of the problem with a free service like the NHS. If a patient had to pay even 10 for an appointment or 20 for a missed appointment, there would be a dramatic reduction in waiting times and a big boost to NHS finances

    Then, yes, we should have compensation for NHS delays as we do for train delays.

    The NHS is the last bastion of unreformed socialism - run for the benefit of staff rather than patients
    Originally posted by caronoel
    Oh here we go...... those greedy doctors and nurses trying to make sure everyone gets treated, the so and so's....
    • caronoel
    • By caronoel 1st Mar 18, 4:34 PM
    • 862 Posts
    • 1,106 Thanks
    caronoel
    Oh here we go...... those greedy doctors and nurses trying to make sure everyone gets treated, the so and so's....
    Originally posted by Comms69
    Oh here we go ... why should the NHS only work 9-5 office hours when nearly everyone else is at work?

    Woe betide you if you need a GP or pharmacy on a Sunday night.
    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 1st Mar 18, 4:39 PM
    • 6,131 Posts
    • 11,533 Thanks
    GwylimT
    Oh here we go ... why should the NHS only work 9-5 office hours when nearly everyone else is at work?

    Woe betide you if you need a GP or pharmacy on a Sunday night.
    Originally posted by caronoel
    When I lived in the UK I could access both of those things. You also have to consider that GPs and pharmacists are very rarely employed by an NHS trust.
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 1st Mar 18, 5:14 PM
    • 20,345 Posts
    • 16,121 Thanks
    agrinnall
    Oh here we go ... why should the NHS only work 9-5 office hours when nearly everyone else is at work?

    Woe betide you if you need a GP or pharmacy on a Sunday night.
    Originally posted by caronoel
    How come I was able to get a chest x-ray done at a walk in clinic with no appointment at 7:30pm last year then?
    • Fishingtime
    • By Fishingtime 1st Mar 18, 6:59 PM
    • 702 Posts
    • 782 Thanks
    Fishingtime
    You allowed double the time it takes to walk the distance But did not allow any extra time for the only part of the journey that was beyond your control.
    Plan better next time to avoid disappointment
    Owing on CC 00.00

    It's like shooting nerds in a barrel
    • Greylocks
    • By Greylocks 2nd Mar 18, 1:59 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Greylocks
    Oh here we go ... why should the NHS only work 9-5 office hours when nearly everyone else is at work?

    Woe betide you if you need a GP or pharmacy on a Sunday night.
    Originally posted by caronoel
    I worked in the NHS for decades and left last July. I often worked 12 hour shifts starting at 8pm and also worked weekends, Bank Holidays and Christmas Days!

    9-5 is not possible for many NHS staff!
    • Korkyb
    • By Korkyb 8th Mar 18, 2:32 AM
    • 216 Posts
    • 102 Thanks
    Korkyb
    Oh here we go ... why should the NHS only work 9-5 office hours when nearly everyone else is at work?

    Woe betide you if you need a GP or pharmacy on a Sunday night.
    Originally posted by caronoel


    Why don't you get a job which only works out of hours / weekends then you will be able to access the NHS 9-5 service without having to take time off work.


    Incidentally I work for the NHS and in a role that means that over 80% of my hours are worked outwith 9-5.


    With regards to your comment - "The NHS is the last bastion of unreformed socialism - run for the benefit of staff rather than patients".............. In my (professional) opinion you should consider visiting your local pharmacy to get a strong laxative - faecal impaction can sometimes cause faeces to be propelled up through the mouth.
    Last edited by Korkyb; 08-03-2018 at 2:39 AM. Reason: ...
    • Pennywise
    • By Pennywise 8th Mar 18, 7:50 AM
    • 10,232 Posts
    • 19,051 Thanks
    Pennywise
    When I lived in the UK I could access both of those things. You also have to consider that GPs and pharmacists are very rarely employed by an NHS trust.
    Originally posted by GwylimT
    May not be "employed" but they're certainly paid for by an NHS trust, so basically the same difference.
    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 8th Mar 18, 7:57 AM
    • 1,110 Posts
    • 1,222 Thanks
    bertiewhite

    The NHS is great but they should admit everything is running late and give you updates for when you should arrive. The appointment time is !!!!!!!! and you know it.
    Originally posted by Carrot007
    My only experience of late appointments was NHS England's Lincoln & Boston hospitals.

    NHS Wales Glangwili's appointments are very prompt.
    • lisyloo
    • By lisyloo 8th Mar 18, 9:00 AM
    • 21,877 Posts
    • 10,582 Thanks
    lisyloo
    If the OP had missed the appointment when travelling by car as a result of a road being blocked by a crash, would the responses on this thread have been the same i.e. 'you shouldn't have cut it so fine'?
    Originally posted by Mids_Costcutter
    Absolutely.
    For something important like this I'd allow at least 1 hour to deal with a change of wheel/tyre.

    I'd also have a "plan B" which in the case of a missed train would probably be a cab.
    • lisyloo
    • By lisyloo 8th Mar 18, 9:04 AM
    • 21,877 Posts
    • 10,582 Thanks
    lisyloo
    Woe betide you if you need a GP or pharmacy on a Sunday night.
    There are out-of-hours doctors available if it's urgent enough.
    Call 111 and they will direct to the appropriate service.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 8th Mar 18, 3:35 PM
    • 2,970 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    Comms69
    Oh here we go ... why should the NHS only work 9-5 office hours when nearly everyone else is at work?

    Woe betide you if you need a GP or pharmacy on a Sunday night.
    Originally posted by caronoel
    1: Not even NHS employees
    and
    2: Ok, why don't you go and train and open a sunday surgery?....
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 8th Mar 18, 3:36 PM
    • 2,970 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    Comms69
    May not be "employed" but they're certainly paid for by an NHS trust, so basically the same difference.
    Originally posted by Pennywise
    No they're not.
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 8th Mar 18, 7:03 PM
    • 1,475 Posts
    • 1,117 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    [QUOTE=Comms69;73993948]1: Not even NHS employees
    and
    2: Ok, why don't you go and train and open a sunday surgery?....[/QUOTE]


    Because people don't want to go to their surgery on their day off. They want to do it during a work day. If GP surgeries were all open during the weekend (and my surgery is part of a three practice group - one of which is always open Saturday on a rotation basis) the extra cost would not be proportionate to the perceived benefit.


    BTW I had to get an emergency prescription from my local (five mins walk) community pharmacist for my wife. The GP surgery had a made a mistake on the repeat scrip. I 'phoned our pharmacy on Saturday, and the pharmacist said "No worries, I'll sort it out". He was really helpful and did sort it out.


    Most people don't need to see a GP at the weekend. Go to a local pharmacy. They're often better that seeing a young and inexperienced GP! (And I used to work in the NHS!)


    The OP was daft leaving a buffer of 15 minutes.
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 8th Mar 18, 7:09 PM
    • 1,475 Posts
    • 1,117 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    Why don't you get a job which only works out of hours / weekends then you will be able to access the NHS 9-5 service without having to take time off work.


    Incidentally I work for the NHS and in a role that means that over 80% of my hours are worked outwith 9-5.


    With regards to your comment - "The NHS is the last bastion of unreformed socialism - run for the benefit of staff rather than patients".............. In my (professional) opinion you should consider visiting your local pharmacy to get a strong laxative - faecal impaction can sometimes cause faeces to be propelled up through the mouth.
    Originally posted by Korkyb

    Well said, KorkyB...


    EDIT: After Gordon Brown's "saving of the world" I thought the banking sector was the last bastion of unreformed socialism! What a fool I am...


    2nd edit: I particularly like the "propelled through the mouth" bit!
    Last edited by Manxman in exile; 08-03-2018 at 7:14 PM. Reason: add
    • Rolandtheroadie
    • By Rolandtheroadie 8th Mar 18, 10:48 PM
    • 4,841 Posts
    • 4,242 Thanks
    Rolandtheroadie
    What utter garbage!

    It was the train company's screw-up that caused the appointment to be missed. It was then the hospital's resolute unwillingness to exercise some discretion and common sense and allow an extra five minutes that caused the appointment to be missed. Finally, my other half has paid the best part of a quarter of a million pounds in tax during her working life thus far, so don't even think about going down the "costing the NHS money" route!!
    Originally posted by Thell
    If it was that important, I'd have got a taxi to the hospital instead of walking the 15 minutes.
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 11th Mar 18, 5:49 PM
    • 1,475 Posts
    • 1,117 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    [QUOTE=Thell;73942657]What utter garbage!

    It was the train company's screw-up that caused the appointment to be missed. It was then the hospital's resolute unwillingness to exercise some discretion and common sense and allow an extra five minutes that caused the appointment to be missed. Finally, my other half has paid the best part of a quarter of a million pounds in tax during her working life thus far, so don't even think about going down the "costing the NHS money" route!![/QUOTE]


    So do you think somebody who has paid more tax than your wife should be given priority over her? I fail to understand your point. If somebody who has never paid tax needs treatment costing 500 grand, should they be prevented from receiving it? (And this includes alcoholics and cigareete smoking lung cancer patients who've probably paid a lot more in duty and taxes than your wife).


    We have a NHS free at the point of delivery. (That doesn't mean that somebody doesn't pay for it). You and your wife's fundamental mistake was not to ensure you could get to the appointment on time.
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