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  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Megan F
    • By MSE Megan F 26th Feb 18, 11:13 AM
    • 398Posts
    • 199Thanks
    MSE Megan F
    MSE News: UK braces for snow disruption
    • #1
    • 26th Feb 18, 11:13 AM
    MSE News: UK braces for snow disruption 26th Feb 18 at 11:13 AM
    Commuters are being warned to expect major disruption as temperatures plummet due to the so-called 'Beast from the East' winter storm...
    Read the full story:
    'UK braces for snow disruption - your rights'


    Click reply below to discuss. If you haven!!!8217;t already, join the forum to reply.
    Last edited by MSE Luke; 26-02-2018 at 2:29 PM.
    Read the latest MSE News
    Flag up a news story: news@moneysavingexpert.com
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Page 1
    • gasandgo
    • By gasandgo 28th Feb 18, 6:27 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    gasandgo
    • #2
    • 28th Feb 18, 6:27 PM
    Paying for non-attendance
    • #2
    • 28th Feb 18, 6:27 PM
    I have booked a car service and a MOT on-line. If I cannot attend due to the snow do I have to pay, or should I be able to ask to re-arrange?
    • KeithP
    • By KeithP 28th Feb 18, 6:55 PM
    • 15,372 Posts
    • 17,999 Thanks
    KeithP
    • #3
    • 28th Feb 18, 6:55 PM
    • #3
    • 28th Feb 18, 6:55 PM
    I have booked a car service and a MOT on-line. If I cannot attend due to the snow do I have to pay, or should I be able to ask to re-arrange?
    Originally posted by gasandgo
    Discuss your options with the service provider.
    .
    • kittychan
    • By kittychan 1st Mar 18, 2:11 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    kittychan
    • #4
    • 1st Mar 18, 2:11 AM
    Help re. Missed flights
    • #4
    • 1st Mar 18, 2:11 AM
    Please can I have your tips on recovering as much as I can on flights missed due to traffic cause by the Beast from the East?

    We left York straight after work on Tuesday, around 7pm, to catch a flight from Heathrow at 9.40am on Wednesday. We were meant to stay overnight with my parents but ended up stuck on the A1m for 14 hours behind a lorry and in heavy snow and went straight to the airport. We arrived at 9am and, understandably, were too late to check in so missed our flight. My brother-in-law called the helplines in Tokyo (our final destination) and Paris (our stopover destination) to notify them that we would not make our flight or connection but was told there was nothing they could do. We called the UK helpline when it opened at 8am and were told the same thing.

    At the airport the airline said we could not be put on standby for a later flight because our tickets were non transferable and there was nothing they could do because it was technically our fault that we missed our flight. We found a flight via a different airline so booked one-way tickets.

    We later learned that missing our outbound flights invalidated our return ticket. Having bought one-way tickets with the other airline we now have to pay for separate return tickets. This will leave us over £2,000 out of pocket, which is obviously not something we can afford.

    Because we did not travel by public transport and were not involved in a car accident, our travel insurance won't cover anything.

    I gather that we can apply for a tax return on our original flights. Is there anything else we are entitled to? Any and all help very much appreciated.
    • Doc N
    • By Doc N 1st Mar 18, 5:33 AM
    • 6,950 Posts
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    Doc N
    • #5
    • 1st Mar 18, 5:33 AM
    • #5
    • 1st Mar 18, 5:33 AM
    That's a dreadful situation, kittychan, and I'm very sorry you find yourself in it.

    I can only think of two possible options, neither of them particularly likely to succeed, but perhaps worth a try.

    1 Throw yourself on the mercy of the airline re the loss of the return ticket. Those rules are there to protect airlines against price manipulation on ticket purchases - not this sort of situation. They'll probably not budge, but if you explain the exceptional circumstances, perhaps in an email to the CEO (!!!!!!!!!!!!!) if it doesn't work further down, there's a tiny chance you might succeed. It can do no harm to try.

    2 Check very carefully the actual wording of your travel policy just in case your situation can be squeezed within it. It probably can't, but look at every possible interpretation of the wording just in case. Failing that, again throw yourself on the mercy of the insurer. Some companies (very few, admittedly) might just be prepared to help.

    Sorry I can't be more helpful, but that's all I can think of for now. Good luck.
    • Doc N
    • By Doc N 1st Mar 18, 5:36 AM
    • 6,950 Posts
    • 19,806 Thanks
    Doc N
    • #6
    • 1st Mar 18, 5:36 AM
    • #6
    • 1st Mar 18, 5:36 AM
    For some reason c e o e m a i l .com appears as a row of exclamation marks. This is a bizarre website sometimes!
    • Magsvs
    • By Magsvs 3rd Mar 18, 12:23 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Magsvs
    • #7
    • 3rd Mar 18, 12:23 PM
    Snow related car park bump
    • #7
    • 3rd Mar 18, 12:23 PM
    Yesterday, whilst driving out of a private car park outside my local supermarket, my vehicle slid on ice/snow and I hit the curb. Whilst at a very slow pace, approx. 5mph, it has broken something meaning it is undriveable(not sure exactly what yet as I can't get it to the garage until monday).

    My question is; does the supermarket/ car park owner hold some liability for this, as get should have cleared the snow/ gritted for ice?

    From what I have found so far, i think they are..

    Under the Workplace Regulations and visitors under!section 2(2) of the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957?
    • KeithP
    • By KeithP 3rd Mar 18, 1:10 PM
    • 15,372 Posts
    • 17,999 Thanks
    KeithP
    • #8
    • 3rd Mar 18, 1:10 PM
    • #8
    • 3rd Mar 18, 1:10 PM
    Yesterday, whilst driving out of a private car park outside my local supermarket, my vehicle slid on ice/snow and I hit the curb. Whilst at a very slow pace, approx. 5mph, it has broken something meaning it is undriveable(not sure exactly what yet as I can't get it to the garage until monday).

    My question is; does the supermarket/ car park owner hold some liability for this, as get should have cleared the snow/ gritted for ice?

    From what I have found so far, i think they are..

    Under the Workplace Regulations and visitors under!section 2(2) of the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957?
    Originally posted by Magsvs
    I would suggest you drove into the kerb.

    In my opinion there is only one person to blame here.
    .
    • LadyDee
    • By LadyDee 3rd Mar 18, 2:24 PM
    • 3,749 Posts
    • 4,016 Thanks
    LadyDee
    • #9
    • 3rd Mar 18, 2:24 PM
    • #9
    • 3rd Mar 18, 2:24 PM
    You lost control of your car, why should anybody else be responsible? The responsible thing to do would have been to heed the weather warnings and stay home 'til the snow thawed (essential workers excepted of course).
    • Doc N
    • By Doc N 3rd Mar 18, 2:27 PM
    • 6,950 Posts
    • 19,806 Thanks
    Doc N
    Yesterday, whilst driving out of a private car park outside my local supermarket, my vehicle slid on ice/snow and I hit the curb. Whilst at a very slow pace, approx. 5mph, it has broken something meaning it is undriveable(not sure exactly what yet as I can't get it to the garage until monday).

    My question is; does the supermarket/ car park owner hold some liability for this, as get should have cleared the snow/ gritted for ice?

    From what I have found so far, i think they are..

    Under the Workplace Regulations and visitors under!section 2(2) of the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957?
    Originally posted by Magsvs
    Possibly, but it would be difficult to establish liability, and there's probably a notice somewhere disclaiming that liability. If there's no notice, the case would be arguable, but certainly not clear cut.
    • Magsvs
    • By Magsvs 5th Mar 18, 8:40 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Magsvs
    Clearing the work!!!8217;s car park

    The workplace car park is covered by!regulation 12(3) of the Workplace (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992!and so employers are under a duty to ensure that all entrances, exits and traffic routes for vehicles and pedestrians are kept free from ice and snow as far as reasonably possible. Employers therefore must be proactive in taking account of weather forecasts and putting measures in place to include clearing snow, gritting surfaces and if necessary closing or diverting routes used by workers and visitors.


    Employers do not have to remove every last trace of snow and ice from every part of the ground outside its premises, but employers should have the materials and resources to deal with the snow or ice and be able to carry out these measures. Employers should therefore have grit or gravel in store. The gritting should take place before workers arrive to work. The areas to focus on are car parks, delivery areas, main entrances and exits. If they fail to take such appropriate measures then they may find themselves liable to claims.


    Clearing the car park at school and at hospital

    Schools and hospitals are employers as well as places where pupils and parents, patients and visitors routinely call. Those institutions must ensure that the paths and car parks are cleared.
    • Doc N
    • By Doc N 5th Mar 18, 9:48 PM
    • 6,950 Posts
    • 19,806 Thanks
    Doc N
    Clearing the work!!!8217;s car park

    The workplace car park is covered by!regulation 12(3) of the Workplace (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992!and so employers are under a duty to ensure that all entrances, exits and traffic routes for vehicles and pedestrians are kept free from ice and snow as far as reasonably possible. Employers therefore must be proactive in taking account of weather forecasts and putting measures in place to include clearing snow, gritting surfaces and if necessary closing or diverting routes used by workers and visitors.


    Employers do not have to remove every last trace of snow and ice from every part of the ground outside its premises, but employers should have the materials and resources to deal with the snow or ice and be able to carry out these measures. Employers should therefore have grit or gravel in store. The gritting should take place before workers arrive to work. The areas to focus on are car parks, delivery areas, main entrances and exits. If they fail to take such appropriate measures then they may find themselves liable to claims.


    Clearing the car park at school and at hospital

    Schools and hospitals are employers as well as places where pupils and parents, patients and visitors routinely call. Those institutions must ensure that the paths and car parks are cleared.
    Originally posted by Magsvs
    Haven't you missed the last, and perhaps most relevant, part of that advice from M/S Canter, Levin and Berg:

    Clearing the supermarket car park

    The same duties that apply at school and at hospital also apply to the local supermarket or DIY outlet or out of town retail park. The car parks and the pathways to and from the car parks and the shop entrances must be cleared and gritted.


    http://www.canter-law.co.uk/news/compensation-slips-trips-snow-ice-2013
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