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  • FIRST POST
    • JamesFuller
    • By JamesFuller 9th Nov 17, 7:17 PM
    • 77Posts
    • 55Thanks
    JamesFuller
    How to calculate Annual Lave days that are paid out? Ideally after tax
    • #1
    • 9th Nov 17, 7:17 PM
    How to calculate Annual Lave days that are paid out? Ideally after tax 9th Nov 17 at 7:17 PM
    Hello all,

    How do you calculate the pay you should get for annual leaves that the company will pay you for not claiming them?

    E.g. Let's say you had 24 days left and the salary was 44,000. And the company will pay you the 24 days.
Page 1
    • PeppaCoin
    • By PeppaCoin 9th Nov 17, 8:05 PM
    • 121 Posts
    • 134 Thanks
    PeppaCoin
    • #2
    • 9th Nov 17, 8:05 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Nov 17, 8:05 PM
    Assuming you work 5 days a week

    44k divided by 260 = 169.23 (your day rate)

    Multiplied by 24 = 4061.52 gross.
    • burnoutbabe
    • By burnoutbabe 9th Nov 17, 9:52 PM
    • 1,299 Posts
    • 1,861 Thanks
    burnoutbabe
    • #3
    • 9th Nov 17, 9:52 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Nov 17, 9:52 PM
    yes, that is how we do it. (260 being 365 days less 104 days which are weekends - not sure now why its not 261 actually)
    • PeppaCoin
    • By PeppaCoin 9th Nov 17, 10:48 PM
    • 121 Posts
    • 134 Thanks
    PeppaCoin
    • #4
    • 9th Nov 17, 10:48 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Nov 17, 10:48 PM
    Well i guess because 52 x5 = 260
    • paddedjohn
    • By paddedjohn 10th Nov 17, 3:12 AM
    • 7,165 Posts
    • 7,810 Thanks
    paddedjohn
    • #5
    • 10th Nov 17, 3:12 AM
    • #5
    • 10th Nov 17, 3:12 AM
    Well i guess because 52 x5 = 260
    Originally posted by PeppaCoin
    But 52.2x 5=261.
    Last edited by paddedjohn; 10-11-2017 at 3:15 AM.
    Be Alert..........Britain needs lerts.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 10th Nov 17, 11:39 AM
    • 32,422 Posts
    • 19,478 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #6
    • 10th Nov 17, 11:39 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Nov 17, 11:39 AM
    working days in a year changes
    There are 14 different years(7*2) they can be 260, 261, 262 working days
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 10th Nov 17, 12:18 PM
    • 4,856 Posts
    • 8,207 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #7
    • 10th Nov 17, 12:18 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Nov 17, 12:18 PM
    working days in a year changes
    There are 14 different years(7*2) they can be 260, 261, 262 working days
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    And some employers still use 365 days.
    • General Grant
    • By General Grant 10th Nov 17, 9:59 PM
    • 738 Posts
    • 839 Thanks
    General Grant
    • #8
    • 10th Nov 17, 9:59 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Nov 17, 9:59 PM
    And some employers still use 365 days.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    As I work in a 24/7 organisation, I use the 365 day year in calculating proportional entitlement for those working part years. This is generally converted to hours because people work different shift lengths.

    For working out the value of that time, I use the hourly rate for the post multiplied by the number of hours represented by the amount of time.

    So for the OP, the calculation would be:

    24 x 7.5 (if that is their standard day length) x (44000/52/37.5)
    (that's also assuming a week of 5 of those standard days)
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 10th Nov 17, 10:15 PM
    • 32,422 Posts
    • 19,478 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #9
    • 10th Nov 17, 10:15 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Nov 17, 10:15 PM
    As I work in a 24/7 organisation, I use the 365 day year in calculating proportional entitlement for those working part years. This is generally converted to hours because people work different shift lengths.

    For working out the value of that time, I use the hourly rate for the post multiplied by the number of hours represented by the amount of time.

    So for the OP, the calculation would be:

    24 x 7.5 (if that is their standard day length) x (44000/52/37.5)
    (that's also assuming a week of 5 of those standard days)
    Originally posted by General Grant
    You say you use days then go onto use 52 weeks.
    • General Grant
    • By General Grant 11th Nov 17, 7:04 PM
    • 738 Posts
    • 839 Thanks
    General Grant
    You say you use days then go onto use 52 weeks.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    When someone is not employed for a full year, the entitlement to the amount of time is based proportion of days in the year.

    The 52 weeks are used in the calculation of what the hourly rate is.
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