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  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Megan F
    • By MSE Megan F 21st Jun 17, 5:14 PM
    • 402Posts
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    MSE Megan F
    The Queen's Speech - what it means for consumers
    • #1
    • 21st Jun 17, 5:14 PM
    The Queen's Speech - what it means for consumers 21st Jun 17 at 5:14 PM
    The Queen has unveiled new laws the Government hopes to pass in the next two years - here's what the announcements mean for consumers.
    'The Queen's Speech - what it means for consumers'

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Page 1
    • MiserlyMartin
    • By MiserlyMartin 22nd Jun 17, 12:28 AM
    • 1,918 Posts
    • 1,372 Thanks
    MiserlyMartin
    • #2
    • 22nd Jun 17, 12:28 AM
    • #2
    • 22nd Jun 17, 12:28 AM
    Comments: I'm glad there is no cap on energy prices. It's obvious that if they had done that, all it would have done was lower the prices of those who couldn't be bothered to switch every year for the best deal, while energy firms push up the price for everyone else to compensate. It was a stupid policy, taken from Labour.

    I don't want a smart meter and lots of other people don't either. What an invasion of privacy.

    Pass a Great Repeal Bill to handle the Brexit transition. The bill will ensure the UK has its own equivalent laws after we leave the European Union.
    We voted to leave to free the UK from the EU laws, so why replicate them?

    The 'living wage' to rise. Bad policy, all it will do it make the UK less competitive globally and cause inflation, so we will be worse off in the end. Socialism. It always fails.
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 22nd Jun 17, 1:03 AM
    • 13,877 Posts
    • 11,171 Thanks
    unholyangel
    • #3
    • 22nd Jun 17, 1:03 AM
    • #3
    • 22nd Jun 17, 1:03 AM
    Comments: I'm glad there is no cap on energy prices. It's obvious that if they had done that, all it would have done was lower the prices of those who couldn't be bothered to switch every year for the best deal, while energy firms push up the price for everyone else to compensate. It was a stupid policy, taken from Labour.

    I don't want a smart meter and lots of other people don't either. What an invasion of privacy.

    Pass a Great Repeal Bill to handle the Brexit transition. The bill will ensure the UK has its own equivalent laws after we leave the European Union.
    We voted to leave to free the UK from the EU laws, so why replicate them?

    The 'living wage' to rise. Bad policy, all it will do it make the UK less competitive globally and cause inflation, so we will be worse off in the end. Socialism. It always fails.
    Originally posted by MiserlyMartin
    As the saying goes, be careful what you wish for.

    I'm wondering exactly what laws the EU gave us that you object to though (as well as wondering if you see the irony of complaining about EU laws on the consumer rights board).

    Is it perhaps the laws that gave us our employment rights? Human rights (you know, the rights that protect us from our own government)? Consumer Rights? Equal rights?

    That is not to say I agree with everything they do. But I can't remember us having any vote on repealing EU laws, only a vote on whether we should continue membership.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • phillw
    • By phillw 22nd Jun 17, 6:46 AM
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    phillw
    • #4
    • 22nd Jun 17, 6:46 AM
    • #4
    • 22nd Jun 17, 6:46 AM
    We voted to leave to free the UK from the EU laws, so why replicate them?
    Originally posted by MiserlyMartin
    If you look at what was promised in the run up to the vote then half the country voted to leave to avoid the made up EU laws (Boris Banana Bunch Ban). I don't think anyone voted to get rid of paternity leave, working time directive & wants a return to polluting beaches and rivers.
    • neilmcl
    • By neilmcl 22nd Jun 17, 7:46 AM
    • 13,386 Posts
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    neilmcl
    • #5
    • 22nd Jun 17, 7:46 AM
    • #5
    • 22nd Jun 17, 7:46 AM
    Pass a Great Repeal Bill to handle the Brexit transition. The bill will ensure the UK has its own equivalent laws after we leave the European Union.
    [/I]We voted to leave to free the UK from the EU laws, so why replicate them?
    Originally posted by MiserlyMartin
    Because that's the "simplest" way to deal with them. Have a single statue that replicates all the relevant EU legislation then allow successive Governments to have the control to change the laws as they see fit further down the line. It's a process.
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 22nd Jun 17, 9:27 AM
    • 10,134 Posts
    • 7,757 Thanks
    pmduk
    • #6
    • 22nd Jun 17, 9:27 AM
    • #6
    • 22nd Jun 17, 9:27 AM
    Remember the GLC? First the Government of the day said they didn't do anything so said they needed to abolish them, then had to create 100+ committees and Quangos/other bodies to replicate their essential functions.


    Beware of all politicians' soundbites.
    Last edited by pmduk; 22-06-2017 at 2:12 PM. Reason: typo
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 22nd Jun 17, 9:55 AM
    • 1,860 Posts
    • 3,932 Thanks
    IAmWales
    • #7
    • 22nd Jun 17, 9:55 AM
    • #7
    • 22nd Jun 17, 9:55 AM
    Comments: I'm glad there is no cap on energy prices. It's obvious that if they had done that, all it would have done was lower the prices of those who couldn't be bothered to switch every year for the best deal, while energy firms push up the price for everyone else to compensate. It was a stupid policy, taken from Labour.

    I don't want a smart meter and lots of other people don't either. What an invasion of privacy.

    Pass a Great Repeal Bill to handle the Brexit transition. The bill will ensure the UK has its own equivalent laws after we leave the European Union.
    We voted to leave to free the UK from the EU laws, so why replicate them?

    The 'living wage' to rise. Bad policy, all it will do it make the UK less competitive globally and cause inflation, so we will be worse off in the end. Socialism. It always fails.
    Originally posted by MiserlyMartin
    The Conservatives were extremely vocal that the energy price capping was not the same as the previous Labour proposal. Are you suggesting the Tories are in the habit of telling lies?

    We* voted to leave the EU, we did not vote to change domestic laws. Unless you had a different voting slip to the rest of us? Which laws do you disagree with?

    The living wage is not inflationary in anything other than GCSE textbooks, nor has it made the UK less competitive. You only need to look at historical data since the introduction of the minimum wage to verify that. In fact the impact of the vote for Brexit is more likely to cause inflation and make us less competitive, as we are already seeing.

    (* To be clear, we didn't all vote for Brexit!)
    • MiserlyMartin
    • By MiserlyMartin 22nd Jun 17, 10:22 AM
    • 1,918 Posts
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    MiserlyMartin
    • #8
    • 22nd Jun 17, 10:22 AM
    • #8
    • 22nd Jun 17, 10:22 AM

    That is not to say I agree with everything they do. But I can't remember us having any vote on repealing EU laws, only a vote on whether we should continue membership.
    Originally posted by unholyangel
    It followed to anyone who did any research about what leaving the EU would mean, that the point of leaving it would be to take back control. For the UK as a sovereign nation to have the power to make its own laws without them being overuled by unelected MPs in Brussels, and to have the freedom of not being tied into EU laws which may suit some countries in Europe but leaves the UK with a bad deal. It all comes down to if you trust MPs in Brussels who are unaccountable to the UK electorate to run the UK and make the laws it must abide by, or your own UK parliament who you do vote for.

    I'm not saying that all EU laws are bad, some we should adopt too, beach standards for example and the recent mobile phone one was once of the few good things they have done. Although I can't help wondering if it is a bribe to keep the status quo and promote their United States of Europe. Freedom of Movement was the big one that so many people don't agree with and it will be the death of the EU along with the missing money they will have to find currently provided by the UK. I could go on for ages but I'm sure this has been debated to death already.
    • MiserlyMartin
    • By MiserlyMartin 22nd Jun 17, 10:36 AM
    • 1,918 Posts
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    MiserlyMartin
    • #9
    • 22nd Jun 17, 10:36 AM
    • #9
    • 22nd Jun 17, 10:36 AM
    The Conservatives were extremely vocal that the energy price capping was not the same as the previous Labour proposal. Are you suggesting the Tories are in the habit of telling lies?

    We* voted to leave the EU, we did not vote to change domestic laws. Unless you had a different voting slip to the rest of us? Which laws do you disagree with?

    The living wage is not inflationary in anything other than GCSE textbooks, nor has it made the UK less competitive. You only need to look at historical data since the introduction of the minimum wage to verify that. In fact the impact of the vote for Brexit is more likely to cause inflation and make us less competitive, as we are already seeing.

    (* To be clear, we didn't all vote for Brexit!)
    Originally posted by IAmWales
    I wouldn't say that was a lie. It was a differerent version of the price cap, but the idea was essentially the same. Any interference in the free market is a stupid idea, the conservatives should have known better, I wonder who came up with that policy, whoever it was did not do May any favours.

    The thing you need to see is that over the last 20 years so many of our domestic laws are EU ones, so they will need looking at in brexit to see if they are right for the UK or there to benefit the EU. This was obvious to most but perhaps not to those who never thought leaving would happen. As I say the power to make our own laws again was one of the fundamental reasons for leaving the EU. If you don't understand that then you had no idea what the decision was about.

    The 'living wage' is inflationary and anti competitive just like any minimum wage, and there is no getting away from that.
    • MiserlyMartin
    • By MiserlyMartin 22nd Jun 17, 10:44 AM
    • 1,918 Posts
    • 1,372 Thanks
    MiserlyMartin
    Because that's the "simplest" way to deal with them. Have a single statue that replicates all the relevant EU legislation then allow successive Governments to have the control to change the laws as they see fit further down the line. It's a process.
    Originally posted by neilmcl
    Fair enough, I suppose it stops the remainers moaning so much in the meantime, as they are throwing up any obstruction they can think of to stop us leaving the EU. Making up terms like hard brexit, so they can hope to have a 'soft brexit' instead which is not actually brexit at all.
    As long as these laws can be looked at soon for example the human rights laws which benefit the criminals not the victims.
    • neilmcl
    • By neilmcl 22nd Jun 17, 10:49 AM
    • 13,386 Posts
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    neilmcl
    TBH, this thread is pointless anyway in terms of consumer issues. We'll carry on with the same rights we currently and nothing's going to change, until all deals have been done.
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