Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Paloma
    • By Former MSE Paloma 7th May 15, 12:42 PM
    • 526Posts
    • 245Thanks
    Former MSE Paloma
    MSE News: Voting today? You don't need a poll card
    • #1
    • 7th May 15, 12:42 PM
    MSE News: Voting today? You don't need a poll card 7th May 15 at 12:42 PM
    If you want to vote today but don't have a poll card, fear not, you can vote without it ...

    Read the full story:

    'Voting today? You don't need a poll card'




    Click reply below to discuss. If you haven’t already, join the forum to reply. If you aren’t sure how it all works, read our New to Forum? Intro Guide.

    Last edited by Former MSE Paloma; 07-05-2015 at 12:53 PM.
Page 1
    • Pincher
    • By Pincher 7th May 15, 1:00 PM
    • 6,516 Posts
    • 2,491 Thanks
    Pincher
    • #2
    • 7th May 15, 1:00 PM
    • #2
    • 7th May 15, 1:00 PM
    Been voting by post for years.


    Had a fall a few weeks ago, had the X-Ray.
    Shouldn't put pressure on it. Queuing?
    Guaranteed to bring on the throbbing, again.


    They can trust us not to falsely declare on the Electoral Registration, by sending the two part code, but they can't trust me to vote online?


    Send me a code by text/e-mail, another by post, and let me vote online. Saves me a trip to the letter box, on throbbing feet.
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 7th May 15, 1:10 PM
    • 22,818 Posts
    • 18,842 Thanks
    agrinnall
    • #3
    • 7th May 15, 1:10 PM
    • #3
    • 7th May 15, 1:10 PM
    Consumer rights eh? I don't think so, but I guess an argument could be made that voters are consumers of the electoral system.
    • Caddyman
    • By Caddyman 7th May 15, 3:12 PM
    • 341 Posts
    • 218 Thanks
    Caddyman
    • #4
    • 7th May 15, 3:12 PM
    • #4
    • 7th May 15, 3:12 PM
    Me and 'er indoors have just been up to our local polling station. To be honest, I'm absolutely surprised these days that people aren't asked for photo ID as a mandatory part of turning up at the polling station. Indeed, I had my photo ID driving licence in my hand to show them, but they're just not interested.

    I guess that's what happens when you live in the land of complete trust and taking people's word that they are who they say they are. Not open for any sort of fraud at all is it? Or am I just a bit cynical?
    • KTF
    • By KTF 7th May 15, 4:35 PM
    • 4,743 Posts
    • 1,945 Thanks
    KTF
    • #5
    • 7th May 15, 4:35 PM
    • #5
    • 7th May 15, 4:35 PM
    What sort of idiot would take a 'selfie' of themselves voting?
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 7th May 15, 4:53 PM
    • 13,997 Posts
    • 11,238 Thanks
    unholyangel
    • #6
    • 7th May 15, 4:53 PM
    • #6
    • 7th May 15, 4:53 PM
    What sort of idiot would take a 'selfie' of themselves voting?
    Originally posted by KTF
    The sort that votes?
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • haynick
    • By haynick 7th May 15, 5:53 PM
    • 439 Posts
    • 477 Thanks
    haynick
    • #7
    • 7th May 15, 5:53 PM
    • #7
    • 7th May 15, 5:53 PM
    The sort that votes?
    Originally posted by unholyangel
    Too true!!!
    The forum police are here. To protect & criticise.
    • hcb42
    • By hcb42 7th May 15, 5:56 PM
    • 5,818 Posts
    • 3,538 Thanks
    hcb42
    • #8
    • 7th May 15, 5:56 PM
    • #8
    • 7th May 15, 5:56 PM
    What sort of idiot would take a 'selfie' of themselves voting?
    Originally posted by KTF
    seen quite a few on facebook today
    • jamesd
    • By jamesd 7th May 15, 9:26 PM
    • 23,460 Posts
    • 15,799 Thanks
    jamesd
    • #9
    • 7th May 15, 9:26 PM
    • #9
    • 7th May 15, 9:26 PM
    I'm absolutely surprised these days that people aren't asked for photo ID as a mandatory part of turning up at the polling station.
    Originally posted by Caddyman
    We already no longer have a proper secret ballot because the ballot paper IDs can be and have been used to identify how people voted. At least we still have a degree of deniability in the ability to claim it wasn't really us who voted.

    Not open for any sort of fraud at all is it? Or am I just a bit cynical?
    Originally posted by Caddyman
    There is a register that says who voted. Among other things this is made available to political parties so they can target those who are more likely voters. If an individual challenges the vote they supposedly cast the ability to track which ballot paper was used can be used to invalidate that vote. I wish that this capability didn't exist, though.

    For those unfamiliar with it, the most prominent case where widespread abuse of the voting system was carried out was probably when it was used to identify everyone who voted for the Communist Party. By that point the party itself had been quite thoroughly compromised and at one point its leader was actually an employee of the Security Service. It was a pretty thorough subversion of the political and voting system so far as that party was concerned.
    • Pincher
    • By Pincher 8th May 15, 8:16 AM
    • 6,516 Posts
    • 2,491 Thanks
    Pincher
    Had six door bell rings yesterday. I said to them it's illegal to canvass on the day of election, and they said they are just urging people to vote. Told them I voted for them two weeks ago by post. Makes no difference, three more people from the same party turned up to urge me to vote up to 8pm.


    No co-ordination whatsoever. What's the point of annoying the people who already voted? The other lots only rang the bell once each.


    Supposed to be resting my foot.
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 8th May 15, 7:28 PM
    • 13,997 Posts
    • 11,238 Thanks
    unholyangel
    Had six door bell rings yesterday. I said to them it's illegal to canvass on the day of election, and they said they are just urging people to vote. Told them I voted for them two weeks ago by post. Makes no difference, three more people from the same party turned up to urge me to vote up to 8pm.


    No co-ordination whatsoever. What's the point of annoying the people who already voted? The other lots only rang the bell once each.


    Supposed to be resting my foot.
    Originally posted by Pincher
    Is it? I thought it was only illegal within 250m of the polling station.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • Pincher
    • By Pincher 9th May 15, 8:48 AM
    • 6,516 Posts
    • 2,491 Thanks
    Pincher
    Is it? I thought it was only illegal within 250m of the polling station.
    Originally posted by unholyangel

    As it happens, I am within 250m of the polling station, a school, not that it's what I thought the rules were.


    http://www.answers.com/Q/Can_you_canvass_on_election_day


    Question. Can you canvass on election day?

    Answer: Yes. On election day, parties and their candidates carry out Get the Vote Out (GTVO) operations, on which they send reminders and visit pledged voters to remind them to go to the polls, sometimes persuading last-minute swing voters on the way. By polling day however, political parties will generally assume everyone has made up their mind, and concentrate chiefly on getting their voters to polling stations rather than winning over new ones.








    Which is what they were doing, except I voted by post nearly two weeks ago, and told them repeatedly over the last two weeks. Nobody was taking any notice of what I tell them, which is rather symbolic of how it actually works in government.
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 9th May 15, 12:09 PM
    • 13,997 Posts
    • 11,238 Thanks
    unholyangel
    As it happens, I am within 250m of the polling station, a school, not that it's what I thought the rules were.


    http://www.answers.com/Q/Can_you_canvass_on_election_day


    Question. Can you canvass on election day?

    Answer: Yes. On election day, parties and their candidates carry out Get the Vote Out (GTVO) operations, on which they send reminders and visit pledged voters to remind them to go to the polls, sometimes persuading last-minute swing voters on the way. By polling day however, political parties will generally assume everyone has made up their mind, and concentrate chiefly on getting their voters to polling stations rather than winning over new ones.








    Which is what they were doing, except I voted by post nearly two weeks ago, and told them repeatedly over the last two weeks. Nobody was taking any notice of what I tell them, which is rather symbolic of how it actually works in government.
    Originally posted by Pincher
    Ah, put in a complaint then?

    http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200607/cmbills/027/07027.i-i.html

    1

    Offence of campaigning within a prescribed area

    (1)

    It shall be an offence to engage in campaigning activity within a prescribed

    area around a polling station on the day of a relevant election at any time

    during the period in which the polling station is open.

    (2)

    In this Act, “campaigning activity” means—

    5

    (a)

    the promotion or distribution of any literature associated with election

    candidates, political parties or associated organisations;

    (b)

    the use of audio equipment, whether stationary or mobile, for the

    propagation of messages relating to an election; or

    (c)

    oral communication for the purpose of eliciting voting intentions or

    10

    influencing the casting of a vote.

    (3)

    The “prescribed area” referred to in subsection (1) shall be an area represented

    by a circle with a radius of 250 metres from the main entrance of a polling

    station.
    Penalty is a fine up to £5000 I believe.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • ask66
    • By ask66 10th May 15, 4:29 PM
    • 83 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    ask66
    "...it is advisable, if possible, to go in with ID and/or proof of address."

    In England, this advice is nonsense. Under the current law, no member of staff in a polling station is permitted to ask for ANY form of identification from a prospective voter.

    A worrying fact is that anyone who goes into a polling station and claims to be a particular elector registered at that polling station must be issued with a ballot paper which will then be allowed to go into the ballot box, providing no-one else has already claimed to be that elector. If they are telling lies, that is a serious offence, but unless the polling station staff are aware that an offence has been committed, it is likely that the offender will get away with it and have his/her vote counted, even if the "real" elector turns up later.

    I have no idea about the law applying outside England.
    • jamesd
    • By jamesd 10th May 15, 6:27 PM
    • 23,460 Posts
    • 15,799 Thanks
    jamesd
    it is likely that the offender will get away with it and have his/her vote counted, even if the "real" elector turns up later.
    Originally posted by ask66
    Each ballot paper has a number. That number is written next to the voter's name on the electoral roll before the paper is handed to them. If two people claim to be the same voter, one of them will be able to prove identity and have only their vote counted.

    This is the same capability that makes it possible to determine who voted for each candidate.
    • ask66
    • By ask66 10th May 15, 7:05 PM
    • 83 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    ask66
    If two people claim to be the same voter, one of them will be able to prove identity and have only their vote counted.
    Originally posted by jamesd
    In theory, yes, of course you are correct. In practice, this would require a lengthy legal process which would significantly delay the result and would be most unlikely to happen.
    • jamesd
    • By jamesd 11th May 15, 8:09 PM
    • 23,460 Posts
    • 15,799 Thanks
    jamesd
    Unlikely except when it matters: where the number of dubious votes could change the result of the election.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

80Posts Today

2,092Users online

Martin's Twitter