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    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 26th Jun 05, 11:40 AM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    • #2
    • 26th Jun 05, 11:40 AM
    • #2
    • 26th Jun 05, 11:40 AM
    The only thing I could find was the penultimate question on a page in Delia on line, there was no answer posted there but the OP may have been answered by email so you might like to ask her.

    To see the page with her post on Click Here
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
    • Bossyboots
    • By Bossyboots 26th Jun 05, 11:56 AM
    • 6,547 Posts
    • 3,310 Thanks
    Bossyboots
    • #3
    • 26th Jun 05, 11:56 AM
    • #3
    • 26th Jun 05, 11:56 AM
    I have one of these. I think I can remember how to do it, but I'm just going to see if the book is handy.

    Edit: Can't find the instructions so will do this from memory. (I haven't used it for a while but am currently feeling ashamed so I am going to dig it out).

    To start with, you need a plain active yoghurt as a starter. You put about a teaspoonful into each jar. You then add warm milk. For an extra creamy yoghurt, I used to mix evaporated milk with warm water. It makes a really creamy yoghurt for very little cost. Mix the starter and milk together and put the lids on. Switch on. The time you leave it for depends a bit on how you like your yoghurt so it will be a bit of trial and error. I think we used to do six hours. If I remember correctly, 8 hours gives you a set yoghurt.

    You then use some of your freshly made yoghurt as your starter for the next batch.

    I stopped using mine because we were not getting through the yoghurt but in fact we are now eating quite a lot again so I think I will give it another go.
    Last edited by Bossyboots; 26-06-2005 at 12:02 PM.
  • apple_mint
    • #4
    • 26th Jun 05, 1:14 PM
    • #4
    • 26th Jun 05, 1:14 PM
    Thank you Squeaky ... it seems a shame that Bel appear to have gone out of business. I suspect they would have started to have some quite good sales now.

    Thank you Bossyboots! I knew someone would have a Bel yoghurt maker somewhere on MSE You are a star

    I'll try this. My efforts with a flask have been very hit and miss so I wanted something a bit more reliable as I am using more and more yoghurt (in desserts and in general cooking). I know yoghurt is cheap in the supermarkets but I wanted to have a bit of control over what goes into it
  • ChocClare
    • #5
    • 26th Jun 05, 4:54 PM
    • #5
    • 26th Jun 05, 4:54 PM
    Apple_Mint:


    Let me know how you get on! I just dug out my old Bel yoghurt maker from the back of a cupboard the other day and put it back again because I can't find the instruction book too (don't remember that it was that substantial to start with...) so I'd be really grateful to know your experiences!

    Thanks very much
    ChocClare
    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 26th Jun 05, 5:22 PM
    • 3,286 Posts
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    apprentice tycoon
    • #6
    • 26th Jun 05, 5:22 PM
    • #6
    • 26th Jun 05, 5:22 PM
    UHT is the easiest milk to use (if you use pasturised you have to heat it to almost boiling point first)

    use 2 teasp of bought live yogurt to start off a batch, mix 1&1/2 pints of milk to this yogurt, mix really well. Add 2 tabspoons of dried milk if you want it thicker (or strain it through muslin when it's done)
    pour into the glasses to 1/4" from the top

    put the caps on and place them on the base of machine, cover with the lid

    the timing depends on how hot the milk was -

    8 hours if straight from the fridge
    6 hours if room temp
    4 hours if heated to 43 degrees (hot but not painful)
    Last edited by apprentice tycoon; 04-10-2005 at 1:42 PM.
    • Magentasue
    • By Magentasue 26th Jun 05, 5:27 PM
    • 4,201 Posts
    • 2,671 Thanks
    Magentasue
    • #7
    • 26th Jun 05, 5:27 PM
    • #7
    • 26th Jun 05, 5:27 PM
    The instructions above look about right to me. I used to have one of these and found it easier to make it up in a jug (about a pint and a half or a litre carton of UHT milk and a tablespoon or two of live yogurt from memory) and then fill the cartons. I remember eight hours but might be wrong on that.

    Anyway, there have been threads about yogurt making on here before and I seem to remember Ted Hutchinson saying he had a yogurt maker similar to yours. Might have been someone else but I'm sure he wouldn't mind if you PMd him.
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 26th Jun 05, 6:12 PM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    • #8
    • 26th Jun 05, 6:12 PM
    • #8
    • 26th Jun 05, 6:12 PM
    The instructions above look about right to me. I used to have one of these and found it easier to make it up in a jug (about a pint and a half or a litre carton of UHT milk and a tablespoon or two of live yogurt from memory) and then fill the cartons. I remember eight hours but might be wrong on that.
    by Magentasue
    There are two threads that might be of some help...

    Yoghurt Recipes

    Yoghurt Maker
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
  • apple_mint
    • #9
    • 26th Jun 05, 7:35 PM
    • #9
    • 26th Jun 05, 7:35 PM
    The yoghurt maker has been on since 3.45 pm using bossyboots instructions. I put greek yogurt in 3 of the jars as starters and the other 3 I have used some of the yoghurt I made in a flask a couple of days ago. My yoghurt instantly curdled but I kept going :rolleyes: The greek yoghurt starter looked OK so that is probably going to work better. Thank you bossyboots, I felt more comfortable starting this having your instructions.

    I used ordinary milk ... so perhaps it won't work as well. I took a sneaky look 10 minutes ago (probably shouldn't have!). They both still look a thin so I'll keep it going for a couple more hours.

    Apprentice_tycoon ...thank you for the instructions. I have some UHT milk ...I'll get a new starter tomorrow and have another go using your instructions. It's really good of you to go to all the trouble of posting from the leaflet.

    Magentasue ... I think I'll give your advice a go and mix it all in one.

    Squeaky ... thank you for the research. The other posts were very useful and I'm going to keep on trying until I get it right!

    Chococlare ... I'll keep posting to let you know how it's going
    • Bossyboots
    • By Bossyboots 26th Jun 05, 7:35 PM
    • 6,547 Posts
    • 3,310 Thanks
    Bossyboots
    Thanks squeaky. I bought yoghurt this weekend but that gives me time to persuade hubby to pull out the dishwasher so I can get behind the cupboard and get my yoghurt maker out.
    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 26th Jun 05, 7:45 PM
    • 3,286 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    apprentice tycoon
    Hello apple_mint.

    You may be unlucky if it is just ordinary milk, the instructions say

    'Pastreurised milks have been treated to 71 degrees for 15 seconds and cooled. Some harmful bacteria may remain so these milks need to be brought to boiling point then cooled to below 50 degrees before adding to the yogurt starter'

    That's why UHT is easier - laziness comes in to it as well as far as I'm concerned!
  • apple_mint
    Oh ... I've probably done it all wrong then. I used my jam thermometer to heat the milk to the yoghurt marker level on it. I probably should have boiled it then and let it cool back down to the marker level.

    Can I do the UHT from cold as well as heating up?

    I take it, I don't have to boil UHT then?
  • apple_mint
    Another thought, will the yoghurt I have made with ordinary milk (however thin) be safe to use if I hadn't boiled it?

    I've generally always heated to the yoghurt heating level and then added yoghurt starter with my experiments with a flask. This is probably why my yoghurt has been hit and miss!
    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 26th Jun 05, 8:06 PM
    • 3,286 Posts
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    apprentice tycoon
    I'm pretty sure that the 'un-boiled' yogurt that it won't do you any harm but I assume that the milk bacteria harms the yogurt bacteria so that's why you have had probs in the past - you could still get some on the go overnight if you wanted?!?.....
  • apple_mint
    Apprentice_tycoon, first batch has worked ... although a little thin. I'll try UHT milk tonight. You are probably right, I was getting failures because I needed to boil the ordinary milk rather than just raising its temperature.
    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 27th Jun 05, 6:23 AM
    • 3,286 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    apprentice tycoon
    So not such a disaster after all then! it does seem that the yogurt was thin because some of the starter bacteria has been wiped out by the milk bacteria, from what was said in the instructions.

    You will find that UHT is easier all round, because with the Bel maker you can put cold milk in and it heats it for you and also you can have lots of UHT in the cupboard ready to go, no fridge space taken up at all. I buy the 6 packs of Litre size UHT because I use almost a full one every day for yogging.

    When you get in to the swing of this you might want to start looking for new pots so you can have some in the fridge and some making. Any small glasses in charity shops etc that fit the indents and fit under the lid will do, if the lids don't fit I'm pretty sure that you can use tin foil as a substitute.

    If you haven't yet read all of the thread on yogurt making it is worth having a look because there were posts about straining the yogurt to make it even creamier and thicker, Lakeland sell yougurt strainers or muslin squares for this.
  • KTFrugal
    Re boiling regular milk -

    instead of faffing around with a thermometer, if you heat the milk in a saucepan till bubbles form at the edge of the pan, but before it rises up and makes a right old mess of the cooker, then leave it alone for an hour, the milk will be sufficiently scalded to knock out the bacteria that would compete with the yogging bugs, but still warm enough to get the starter going.
  • apple_mint
    Thank you Apprentice Tycoon and KTFrugal. I've been to Tesco and got an organic yogurt as a starter and both UHT milk (full fat) and some organic full fat milk. Will set off my next lot tomorrow.

    I've got the first lot going through some muslin into a jug in the fridge - so all is not lost . The Lakeland yogurt strainer sounds a good idea so I'll take a look at that at the weekend.

    Thank you to everyone who has helped me with this
  • ChocClare
    Thanks so much for logging your experiences, Apple_Mint, I'm raring to go now!

    Also SUPER DOOPER thanks to Apprentice Tycoon and KTFrugal for the instructions!

    Does one have to use full-fat UHT milk, do you know? (Do they make a semi-skimmed one, I've never bought it so don't know!) Would it work with semi-skimmed or skimmed? I'm off to Tesco's to buy some this afternoon, but if anyone knows before about 3pm, I'd be very grateful!!

    ChocClare
    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 28th Jun 05, 10:37 AM
    • 3,286 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    apprentice tycoon
    Hello again! I have tried the skimmed milk and I'm afraid that I prefer the full fat, they both work OK, so it's just personal choice, try both!
    I strain ours it is so thick you can stand a spoon up in it, it seems very luxurious for something that is the price of just milk. I am going to have a go at making cheesecake with some that I strained until it was dry and spreadable like Philly ( I saw this in a book described as yogurt cheese) so if I can use it for cheesecake and it tastes OK I will be 100% delighted!
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