Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Martin
    • By MSE Martin 26th Sep 07, 10:15 AM
    • 8,111Posts
    • 42,248Thanks
    MSE Martin
    Great Teaching Resources Hunt
    • #1
    • 26th Sep 07, 10:15 AM
    Great Teaching Resources Hunt 26th Sep 07 at 10:15 AM
    What's it about?

    If your children come home asking for help with their schoolwork, or you want to try and help with their learning, often there's little or no help available for parents, many of whom went to school a long time ago!. So I thought I'd tap MoneySavers' wealth of knowledge to gather a list of online and offline resources to help you educate your kids

    So I thought I'd tap MoneySavers' wealth of knowledge to gather a list of online and offline resources to help parents doing this.

    What to do

    If you help your kids with their education, and find a particular website helpful or know of a help centre in your area, or if you have tips and suggestions for other parents in the same situation then click reply and let other MoneySavers know.



    Last edited by Former MSE Wendy; 02-10-2007 at 8:03 PM.
    Martin Lewis, Money Saving Expert.
    Please note, answers don't constitute financial advice, it is based on generalised journalistic research. Always ensure any decision is made with regards to your own individual circumstance.

    Don't miss out on urgent MoneySaving, get my weekly e-mail at www.moneysavingexpert.com/tips.

    Debt-Free Wannabee Official Nerd Club: (Honorary) Members number 000
Page 1
    • oldMcDonald
    • By oldMcDonald 26th Sep 07, 2:57 PM
    • 1,897 Posts
    • 6,875 Thanks
    oldMcDonald
    • #2
    • 26th Sep 07, 2:57 PM
    • #2
    • 26th Sep 07, 2:57 PM
    Well first, for the people who may not be Home edding but are thinking of it, sites to give you information all about home ed

    http://www.education-otherwise.org.uk/
    http://www.home-education.org.uk/
    http://www.when.omnia.co.uk/index.html

    Some sites worth a look (and there are many, many more available on the internet)

    http://happychild.org.uk/
    http://homeed.cjb.net/
    http://www.thelessonmachine.com/
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/


    Last edited by Former MSE Wendy; 09-10-2007 at 7:21 PM. Reason: dead link




    • marrbett
    • By marrbett 26th Sep 07, 10:47 PM
    • 1,774 Posts
    • 24,345 Thanks
    marrbett
    • #3
    • 26th Sep 07, 10:47 PM
    • #3
    • 26th Sep 07, 10:47 PM
    Another site we use alot is
    http://www.enchantedlearning.com/Home.html
    A free site,but we subscribe once a year.
    Also want to say hello to any fellow home-ed mums/dads out there,I didn't realise mse knew about Home Education!!!!!
  • bonnie
    • #4
    • 27th Sep 07, 1:01 PM
    • #4
    • 27th Sep 07, 1:01 PM
    i have been home-edding since easter.
    Woodlands primary school website is fantastic and free also
    BBC schools.
    How about a home education board on here.
  • sp1964
    • #5
    • 27th Sep 07, 10:03 PM
    • #5
    • 27th Sep 07, 10:03 PM
    MEP Maths is a great free resource.This is a complete maths curriculum from the University of Plymouth with lesson plans and worksheets and covers Reception to GCSE.Some of it is password protected but if you email them and explain that you're home educating they will send you the password.
    http://www.cimt.plymouth.ac.uk/projects/mep/default.htm
    • marrbett
    • By marrbett 28th Sep 07, 9:08 AM
    • 1,774 Posts
    • 24,345 Thanks
    marrbett
    • #6
    • 28th Sep 07, 9:08 AM
    • #6
    • 28th Sep 07, 9:08 AM
    MEP Maths is a great free resource.This is a complete maths curriculum from the University of Plymouth with lesson plans and worksheets and covers Reception to GCSE.Some of it is password protected but if you email them and explain that you're home educating they will send you the password.
    http://www.cimt.plymouth.ac.uk/projects/mep/default.htm
    Originally posted by sp1964
    Thanks for this website. I'm sure it's going to be very helpful for us.
    We are home-edding 4 children,aged 12,10 ,8 and 4. makes for a very messy home!!!
    • loveandlight
    • By loveandlight 28th Sep 07, 12:32 PM
    • 1,177 Posts
    • 932 Thanks
    loveandlight
    • #7
    • 28th Sep 07, 12:32 PM
    • #7
    • 28th Sep 07, 12:32 PM
    Wow Martin, thanks for thinking about us home-edders.This is a great idea. I've been home edding my 10yr old for about three years now. I'm just going out so when I get back later, I'll post some of the resources I use.
  • sp1964
    • #8
    • 28th Sep 07, 1:36 PM
    • #8
    • 28th Sep 07, 1:36 PM
    This is also a good site.You can sell or buy used books here
    http://bringandbuy.org.uk/

    There is also a yahoo group which sells brilliant second hand books
    PreLovedBooks UK
    • loveandlight
    • By loveandlight 28th Sep 07, 6:09 PM
    • 1,177 Posts
    • 932 Thanks
    loveandlight
    • #9
    • 28th Sep 07, 6:09 PM
    • #9
    • 28th Sep 07, 6:09 PM
    Here are some I use.
    www.sparkisland.com
    www.educationcity.co.uk
    www.edplace.co.uk
    www.teachingtime.co.uk
    www.muddlepuddle.co.uk

    Also some libraries will let you borrow more books and for a much longer period once they know you are homed educating. So its worth speaking to your local library about this.
  • aimee21j
    There is a fantastic website I use a lot in school
    www.primaryresources.co.uk
    • Katgoddess
    • By Katgoddess 28th Sep 07, 6:49 PM
    • 1,797 Posts
    • 1,426 Thanks
    Katgoddess
    http://oldfashionededucation.com/
    "A baby will make love stronger, days shorter, nights longer, bankroll smaller, home happier, clothes shabbier, the past forgotten, and the future worth living for."
  • TheRehn
    ooh I knew my massive folder of bookmarks would one day be useful!
    Here are some of my favourites

    free unit studies
    http://www.easyfunschool.com/ --- this one is great
    http://www.homeschoollearning.com/units/ -free samples for commercial curriculum

    teachers resources from BBC newsround
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/teachers/default.stm - aimed at teachers but still AMAZING.

    free printable stuff
    http://www.hsunlimited.com/freestuff/ - printable worksheets, notebooking forms and random stuff
    http://donnayoung.org/ - the best place for homeschool printables on the web (science is creationist science)
    http://www.notebooking.org/ notebooking printables and lots of info on notebooking (science is creationist science)

    Unusual stuff
    learn history through food
    http://www.foodtimeline.org/
    learning through movies @ movies in the classroom
    http://www.classbrain.com/artmovies/publish/
    craft projects
    www.craftbits.com
    free audio books
    www.librivox.org

    University 'OpenCourseWare' (for higher-level students)




    Free course materials from:
    MIT http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/web/home/home/index.htm
    The Open University http://openlearn.open.ac.uk/
    Other universities http://www.ocwconsortium.org/
    Ruth
    P.S -Just so you know: I don't home educate or even have kids, but I have an interest in all forms of alternative education, been particulary fascinated recently with homeschooling and notebooking (I am now adapting that for myself!) Charlotte Masons' educational theory, Summerhill and other democractic schools and folk high schools in Denmark (btw these look like they'd be great for students age 17+ who are just finishing home education - you usually go for about 3 or 4 months, they have no exams and it is all about learning for pleasure. http://www.hojskolerne.dk/the-danish-folk-high-school).

    P.P.S Did anyone see the channel 4 news thing on Home Education, I thought it was quite negative and am confused why the government thinks it is a bad thing that one education doesn't suit all and that parents are doing the best for their kids, then there was this lady saying homeschooling wasn't safe because there were no benchmarks or targets and it made me laugh, because many people homeschool because of the focus on targets over what is best for the child.
    Last edited by TheRehn; 30-09-2007 at 12:38 AM.
  • dee mum of 3
    P.P.S Did anyone see the channel 4 news thing on Home Education, I thought it was quite negative and am confused why the government thinks it is a bad thing that one education doesn't suit all and that parents are doing the best for their kids, then there was this lady saying homeschooling wasn't safe because there were no benchmarks or targets and it made me laugh, because many people homeschool because of the focus on targets over what is best for the child.

    we have been home educating for nearly 3 years athough the last 2 years were with our middle son but hes gone to secondary school so now its just 1 child......initially we began bcos of middle sons health and falling standards in school (middle son still isnt100% well but was desperate to go to "big" school with his older brother)but even now we will continue with our youngest as its so succesful,I think schools are very quick to label childrens abilities- i feel we faced a lot of controversy in "opting out" weve had to welcome people in our home who ordinarily i wouldnt entertain and certainly wouldnt want to discuss my childs education with ,also people can be very thoughtless and assume the worst.
    We do get inspected and checked up on contrary to belief and as our home ed officers continually change they all check in different ways from relaxed and informal to very rigid even having children read to her...any way back to what TheRehn asked I personally think these programmes are edited to try and put people off home schooling far easier to have all the children in school rather than mere parents questioning our education system -it keeps everyone in their places.
    dee mum of 3 "before you buy ...think,how many hours have i worked to pay for this?,do i need it? or can i get it r&r in tesco!! hee heee
    • earthmother
    • By earthmother 30th Sep 07, 10:23 AM
    • 2,526 Posts
    • 5,433 Thanks
    earthmother
    I don't home ed, but I do google most weeks for homework help etc for my 6 year old (yr2). I can see me coming to this thread just as much in the future


    I came across this site the other week and found it very useful (was looking for cursive writing practice - the sheets here helped my unwilling writer enjoy writing for a change) - http://www.sparklebox.co.uk/

    DFW Nerd no. 884 - Proud to be dealing with have dealt with my debts
    • oldMcDonald
    • By oldMcDonald 30th Sep 07, 11:54 AM
    • 1,897 Posts
    • 6,875 Thanks
    oldMcDonald

    Do any of you that educate your children at home think there is any place in the market for someone with my experience to act as an advisor for parents setting up learning programmes for their children at home etc or as a tutor who works with parents and children in their homes? I have done private tuition for children who have been deemed to be 'failing' at school in the past but once again the kind of teaching required is very much based on school demands rather than the child's own needs and interests.

    I'd love to work in an alternative system of education but my suspiscion is that most parents who home educate don't have the money to pay anyone else as they already have to stay at home and give up most paid employment. Or have I got that completely wrong?
    Originally posted by Nenen
    well, personally I don't have two pennies to rub together at the end of the week!!

    I know a lot of teachers who HE (and for the same reasons that you state) A couple of them have started their own company up selling 'curriculum boxes', where they provide a daily plan for the child to follow and all the books, it isn't cheap but is liked by parents who decide to follow curriculum based learning.

    Several of the them also work at home as a tutor, both for schooled children, and for children who are HE but are doing GSCEs privately - but it sounds like you have done this sort of thing anyway.

    I think that some people may find an advisor helpful - we decided to go down the autonomous route of HE, but I know that there are many people new to HE who do worry about providing a full education and many want to follow a plan / timetable. There is a lot of information available on the internet for them, but I think sometimes there is the feeling that they would like some face to face help?

    Do you know anyone who HEs near to you? Maybe they could introduce you to the local group and you could get to ask people what they feel is lacking locally?




  • chocaholic110
    I'm not a home educator but use this site loads at school for links to different curriculum areas

    http://www.coxhoe.durham.sch.uk/Curriculum/Curriculum.htm
  • KingCraigo
    Hello,
    I am a maths teacher from Liverpool, and I have just recently set up my own website to try and help pupils with their maths when they are at home. I have tried to write the notes and materials in a more pupil-friendly way than the textbooks, and there are lots of free resources and links to other good websites on their too. The Teacher section is pretty much complete (loads of free resources for teachers and parents), and I am adding to the pupil bit every day, and with any luck it should be completed by Christmas.
    Anyway, if you would like to have a look, the website can be found at: www.mrbartonmaths.com. I hope it helps.
  • devon-gnome
    brilliant history resources
    http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/resources/

    I've used lots of these for literacy comprehension






    Last edited by Former MSE Wendy; 09-10-2007 at 7:21 PM.
  • EvilMonkey
    A bit of a general trick. For ANY subject (I've taught ICT, Science & Maths in my time & helped out daughter with many more). Google what you're looking for, then add KS1, KS2, KS3 etc. for more specific resources.

    Eg. Did a no-notice lesson on how fossil fuels are produced and "fossil fuels KS3" gave me 4-5 brilliant animated / clear resources for the kids to use.

    E.M.
  • tigsowner
    home-ed links
    I'd just like to thank everyone who's posted links here! I am currently searching the web for useful stuff for my 3 year old, with a view to eventually "formally" home educating her rather than sending her to school. (Schools here are a mess and whilst they haven't actually failed her bright siblings, haven't done much more either.) Anyway, I'd already found some of these sites and the others look good too.

    I've also tried typing "teaching resource", etc into Ebay's search and found some useful stuff. Ok, it's cheating a bit but my drawing skills are useless and having someone else do some of the thinking can be a great timesaver.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

248Posts Today

3,131Users online

Martin's Twitter