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  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Helen
    • By Former MSE Helen 11th Nov 13, 8:15 AM
    • 2,324Posts
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    Former MSE Helen
    MSE News: Rent payments on credit files 'should help social housing tenants'
    • #1
    • 11th Nov 13, 8:15 AM
    MSE News: Rent payments on credit files 'should help social housing tenants' 11th Nov 13 at 8:15 AM
    "A new scheme to put rent payments on credit files will start next year, MoneySavingExpert.com understands ..."

    Read the full story:

    Rent payments on credit files 'should help tenants'



    Click reply below to discuss. If you haven’t already, join the forum to reply. If you aren’t sure how it all works, read our New to Forum? Intro Guide.

    Last edited by Former MSE Helen; 11-11-2013 at 8:56 AM.
Page 1
  • Road_Hog
    • #2
    • 11th Nov 13, 8:20 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Nov 13, 8:20 AM
    I can't see this helping tenants. Just another industry wheeze to provide a profit centre.
  • ValHaller
    • #3
    • 11th Nov 13, 9:20 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Nov 13, 9:20 AM
    I seem to remember that this was put a stop to a while back

    from TFA

    Tenants living in rented homes would have better access to bank accounts and credit if information about rent payments was added to their credit rating, says Experian.
    Really this is Experian grandstanding and trying to increase their market. It is not necessarily an entirely good thing.
    You might as well ask the Wizard of Oz to give you a big number as pay a Credit Referencing Agency for a so-called 'credit-score'
  • Road_Hog
    • #4
    • 11th Nov 13, 10:12 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Nov 13, 10:12 AM
    I seem to remember that this was put a stop to a while back

    from TFA



    Really this is Experian grandstanding and trying to increase their market. It is not necessarily an entirely good thing.
    Originally posted by ValHaller
    Yep, all about increasing business and profits. Personally I think companies already get too much information about people. If you apply for a job these days, the criminal record section wants to know about motoring offences.

    What on earth has a 3 pointer got to do with my ability to do the job. I'm so glad I'm self employed these days.
    • ruggedtoast
    • By ruggedtoast 11th Nov 13, 10:15 AM
    • 9,493 Posts
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    ruggedtoast
    • #5
    • 11th Nov 13, 10:15 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Nov 13, 10:15 AM
    And in one fell swoop the tenant's legal right to withhold rent if a landlord refuses to do repairs disappears entirely.
    • dodger1
    • By dodger1 11th Nov 13, 10:21 AM
    • 4,363 Posts
    • 5,623 Thanks
    dodger1
    • #6
    • 11th Nov 13, 10:21 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Nov 13, 10:21 AM
    And in one fell swoop the tenant's legal right to withhold rent if a landlord refuses to do repairs disappears entirely.
    Originally posted by ruggedtoast
    According to the CAB there is no legal right,

    http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/england/housing_e/housing_renting_a_home_e/getting_repairs_done_while_renting.htm
    • amiehall
    • By amiehall 11th Nov 13, 11:11 AM
    • 1,353 Posts
    • 1,609 Thanks
    amiehall
    • #7
    • 11th Nov 13, 11:11 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Nov 13, 11:11 AM
    And in one fell swoop the tenant's legal right to withhold rent if a landlord refuses to do repairs disappears entirely.
    Originally posted by ruggedtoast
    This right doesn't exist. If you withhold rent, you could find yourself with a CCJ.

    I would be slightly concerned about this in general though, simply because I have had some pretty unprofessional landlords in the past. I can imagine adding a battle to have unjust statements removed from the credit record to the fight to have your full deposit returned...
    • chanz4
    • By chanz4 11th Nov 13, 11:16 AM
    • 10,046 Posts
    • 2,992 Thanks
    chanz4
    • #8
    • 11th Nov 13, 11:16 AM
    • #8
    • 11th Nov 13, 11:16 AM
    I wouldn't trust a landlord to report, oh I don't like you missed payment. Also Experian believe the lender over the persons whos file it is even with proof so cant see it been a good thing.

    Experian like it for one reason, money from the landlords to report to them.
    Don't put your trust into an Experian score - it is not a number any bank will ever use & it is generally a waste of money to purchase it. They are also selling you insurance you dont need.
    • rpc
    • By rpc 11th Nov 13, 11:37 AM
    • 2,308 Posts
    • 3,505 Thanks
    rpc
    • #9
    • 11th Nov 13, 11:37 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Nov 13, 11:37 AM
    I wouldn't trust a landlord to report, oh I don't like you missed payment. Also Experian believe the lender over the persons whos file it is even with proof so cant see it been a good thing
    Originally posted by chanz4
    "Your rent has just gone up (with no proper process or maybe even in the fixed term). If you don't pay it, I'll report you."

    If landlords (social and private) are to be permitted to report to credit agencies then surely they should be regulated as a credit provider and have routes such as the FOS open for adjudication?

    How does this tie in with HB? "The state successfully paid X's rent for them for Y years."
    • JuicyJesus
    • By JuicyJesus 11th Nov 13, 11:46 AM
    • 3,653 Posts
    • 4,161 Thanks
    JuicyJesus
    A bit of ado about nothing. Under the principles of reciprocity, lenders (and others) can only see data they elect to feed back into the system from their own customers. So those who do not intend update rent payment history with CRAs will not be able to see peoples' payment histories themselves. As it is most tenant searches now just look for CCJs, which are public information and more relevant to tenancy checks than anything else. As far as I am aware, there is also a fee for a company to join the credit reporting reciprocal system, which would put off all but the largest estate agents from joining.

    The payment history will probably not be therefore used or supplied by many. I don't personally see the issue on principle: rent is a priority expenditure, and payment history is reported on most other similar agreements which are far less important. If someone fails to meet their #1 most important obligation then that is very relevant information for a person's credit standing.
    urs sinserly,
    ~~joosy jeezus~~
    • ahxcjb
    • By ahxcjb 11th Nov 13, 2:13 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 66 Thanks
    ahxcjb
    Yep, all about increasing business and profits. Personally I think companies already get too much information about people. If you apply for a job these days, the criminal record section wants to know about motoring offences.
    Originally posted by Road_Hog
    That is simply not true. An employer has no right to ask you to declare non-recordable offences (ie, the vast majority of motoring offences) as they are immediately 'spent' under the ROA 1974.

    However, if you've been convicted of a recordable motoring offence (drink driving, dangerous driving, careless driving etc) then there is no question that these should and need to be declared. These are serious offences, and shouldn't be regarded as 'just' driving offences.

    I hope that clarifies.
  • Road_Hog
    That is simply not true. An employer has no right to ask you to declare non-recordable offences (ie, the vast majority of motoring offences) as they are immediately 'spent' under the ROA 1974.
    Originally posted by ahxcjb
    I was recently shown a job application form for one of the top four UK supermarkets. They specifically asked for all criminal convictions, INCLUDING motoring offences to be declared.

    Of course they have a right, they can ask anything they like. I don't agree with it, but that is the truth, then can and will.
    • ahxcjb
    • By ahxcjb 11th Nov 13, 2:44 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 66 Thanks
    ahxcjb
    I was recently shown a job application form for one of the top four UK supermarkets. They specifically asked for all criminal convictions, INCLUDING motoring offences to be declared.

    Of course they have a right, they can ask anything they like. I don't agree with it, but that is the truth, then can and will.
    Originally posted by Road_Hog
    They have no legal right to ask for non-recordable offences. I assure you. You are not under any legal compulsion to disclose your driving record to them unless offences noted on your licence are recordable.

    Also, be aware, a penalty notice for a motoring offence is NOT a criminal conviction.
    Last edited by ahxcjb; 11-11-2013 at 2:49 PM.
    • dodger1
    • By dodger1 11th Nov 13, 2:52 PM
    • 4,363 Posts
    • 5,623 Thanks
    dodger1
    That is simply not true. An employer has no right to ask you to declare non-recordable offences (ie, the vast majority of motoring offences) as they are immediately 'spent' under the ROA 1974.

    However, if you've been convicted of a recordable motoring offence (drink driving, dangerous driving, careless driving etc) then there is no question that these should and need to be declared. These are serious offences, and shouldn't be regarded as 'just' driving offences.

    I hope that clarifies.
    Originally posted by ahxcjb
    What about simple speeding offences?
    • rpc
    • By rpc 11th Nov 13, 3:28 PM
    • 2,308 Posts
    • 3,505 Thanks
    rpc
    If you are asked a question like that, you can normally answer as if the spent offence does not exist. It would be a breach of statutory duty to penalise you on the basis of spent offences in most work sectors.

    A fine (e.g. speeding conviction) is spent after 5 years. Points don't come into it.

    I don't know what the status of FPNs is - they aren't convictions so the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act probably doesn't apply. An enhanced CRB check will not show up any speeding offences dealt with by FPN, it will show up any that went to court.
    • ahxcjb
    • By ahxcjb 11th Nov 13, 3:53 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 66 Thanks
    ahxcjb
    What about simple speeding offences?
    Originally posted by dodger1
    Depends how it was dealt with. If the offence was dealt with by a court, then that is a 'criminal conviction'. However, the offence of 'speeding' is not recordable so it wouldn't appear on a CRB check (or ACRO certificate). That said, you should just simply answer the question as asked taking into account the ROA 1974. So if you were convicted in court of exceeding the speed limit 3 years ago, and you were asked to declare any criminal convictions, you should declare it.

    If you were given a FPN for the offence of speeding, that is NOT a criminal conviction and should NOT be declared.
  • Zorz
    Company peddling product X claims that product X is amazing...
    You wanna hear about my new obsession?
    I'm riding high upon a deep recession...
    • JuicyJesus
    • By JuicyJesus 11th Nov 13, 4:22 PM
    • 3,653 Posts
    • 4,161 Thanks
    JuicyJesus
    If landlords (social and private) are to be permitted to report to credit agencies then surely they should be regulated as a credit provider and have routes such as the FOS open for adjudication?
    Originally posted by rpc
    This is wrong on a number of levels. Many businesses already report onto credit files (e.g. telecom companies, some utility firms) without actually being providers of credit or being regulated as such, or indeed without many people disputing their ability or right to record defaults and missed payment information on credit files. Moreover, regulation as a credit provider would be massive overkill for a business that does not actually intend to provide any credit, it would lead to massive and unjustified overheads for letting agents and landlords alike and require them to satisfy requirements which simply do not apply to the business of lettings. FOS would also be able to deny jurisdiction over any complaint because the product complained about was not actually a financial one, let alone one of the financial ones they have jurisdiction over. Furthermore, those renting through agents may have access to the Property Ombudsman already, making the FOS (even if it had jurisdiction) redundant.

    As I noted above, it costs money to link to a credit reference agency, and there is a lot of overhead and hassle for them for virtually no benefit, meaning that private landlords (who are, in all fairness, more likely to behave in a disreputable fashion) are extremely unlikely to sign up to share rental data. I would also question whether a private individual, as opposed to a company, would be able to sign up to provide data to (and therefore receive it from) Experian in the first place.
    urs sinserly,
    ~~joosy jeezus~~
    • BigAunty
    • By BigAunty 11th Nov 13, 4:34 PM
    • 7,941 Posts
    • 14,422 Thanks
    BigAunty
    Haven't read the full article but does this mean that social housing tenants can get their credit record damaged by rent arrears in the same way that property owners affect their credit record if they miss mortgage payments?
    • ahxcjb
    • By ahxcjb 11th Nov 13, 6:02 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 66 Thanks
    ahxcjb
    Haven't read the full article but does this mean that social housing tenants can get their credit record damaged by rent arrears in the same way that property owners affect their credit record if they miss mortgage payments?
    Originally posted by BigAunty
    Depends. IF the landlord is going to bother with buying into Experian's little money making scheme, then yes their credit record could be negatively affected if they miss payments.
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