Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Helen
    • By Former MSE Helen 5th Sep 13, 11:41 AM
    • 2,324Posts
    • 971Thanks
    Former MSE Helen
    MSE News: Student rent costs soar by 8.5%
    • #1
    • 5th Sep 13, 11:41 AM
    MSE News: Student rent costs soar by 8.5% 5th Sep 13 at 11:41 AM
    "Student rent prices have soared by 8.5% in the past year, with the average price of a room now reaching £357 per month..."

    Read the full story:

    Student rent costs soar by 8.5%




    Click reply below to discuss. If you havenít already, join the forum to reply. If you arenít sure how it all works, read our New to Forum? Intro Guide.

Page 1
    • dimbo61
    • By dimbo61 5th Sep 13, 3:44 PM
    • 10,252 Posts
    • 5,561 Thanks
    dimbo61
    • #2
    • 5th Sep 13, 3:44 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Sep 13, 3:44 PM
    Please check out the code of standards that many university housing offices now require.
    Many lenders do not allow BTL mortgages when renting to groups of students, many insurance companies will not provide Landlord insurance for student properties.
    Councils in many parts of the country are using Article 4 and planning objections to stop small student developments ( but not huge ones !!!)
    Fire safety,gas safety, electrical safety checks/ certificates, PAT testing, energy saving measures, security measures, demands from students and Parents for a safe, clean property with all mod cons, Fast internet, Sky or BT sport, dishwasher, American fridge freezer, location and all the student nightlife in walking distance.
    Property prices are higher in student areas and higher maintenance Every year.
    • Pincher
    • By Pincher 5th Sep 13, 6:20 PM
    • 6,516 Posts
    • 2,491 Thanks
    Pincher
    • #3
    • 5th Sep 13, 6:20 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Sep 13, 6:20 PM
    "The research also found that in eight of the areas examined, rents are higher than students are willing to pay. The biggest discrepancy was in Exeter, where the average monthly student flatshare rent was £385, but students said they were only willing to pay a maximum of £300."

    So, does this mean that there are lots of empty flats?
    • Pincher
    • By Pincher 5th Sep 13, 6:36 PM
    • 6,516 Posts
    • 2,491 Thanks
    Pincher
    • #4
    • 5th Sep 13, 6:36 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Sep 13, 6:36 PM
    Fire safety,gas safety, electrical safety checks/ certificates, PAT testing, energy saving measures, security measures, demands from students and Parents for a safe, clean property with all mod cons, Fast internet, Sky or BT sport, dishwasher, American fridge freezer, location and all the student nightlife in walking distance.
    Property prices are higher in student areas and higher maintenance Every year.
    Originally posted by dimbo61
    Interesting market niche you are going for. The Brunei Royal children bring their own servants, I hear.
    • Annabee
    • By Annabee 5th Sep 13, 6:45 PM
    • 596 Posts
    • 454 Thanks
    Annabee
    • #5
    • 5th Sep 13, 6:45 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Sep 13, 6:45 PM
    My daughter has paid more than the average quoted for the last 2 years. But she is studying in the South East.

    I think it is true to say that landlords must make huge profits out of renting to students. They can take a 5 bed house and charge £400 a month each per student, which obviously is far more lucrative than renting to a family. The students will also accept a lower standard of decor than a family would. OK, students are more likely to cause damage, but that's what deposits are for. Also it has become the norm for students to pay rent over the summer as well, even though they won't be needing the accommodation then. My daughter and her housemates reserved a house in January for the following academic year (ie to move in in September) and still had to pay half rent from 1 July, even though they were not allowed any access during this time.

    The letting agencies take advantage of the students by charging large fees, and to be honest, they exploit the fact that the students are young and inexperienced and don't know their rights. They (the LAs) are leeches really.

    But as much as the private sector milks students as much as they can, I think the university provided accommodation (usually for 1st years) is worse in this respect (cost). My daughter was charged an absolute fortune for her en suite room (and of course most 18 year olds want en suite!) when she was in year one (University of Kent). The room was nice, but I do think the universities are using their student accommodation to squeeze as much cash as possible from their students (and their families).
    Last edited by Annabee; 06-09-2013 at 12:29 AM.
    • dimbo61
    • By dimbo61 5th Sep 13, 9:44 PM
    • 10,252 Posts
    • 5,561 Thanks
    dimbo61
    • #6
    • 5th Sep 13, 9:44 PM
    • #6
    • 5th Sep 13, 9:44 PM
    Again please have a look on the Manchster Student Homes website re summer rent !!! and also the standard of room/property you need to be an ACCREDITED LANDLORD
    Yes you can make more money from renting out rooms to students rather than renting a family home to a family BUT there is much more work involved, Families can and often do stay long term and not move out after 10/12 months.
    By offering a high standard of property and reasonable rents with extras ( SKY/BT) we have no problems getting and keeping tenants
    FEES please read the MSH website re FEES ( only rent and deposit allowed) LETTING AGENTS have nice shiny offices and staff to pay!!
    Universties provide there own accommodation and charge what they want which is why many students get together and live in shared houses
    for the second/third years.
    Supply and Demand govern the costs of student rentals.
    I looked at a new student development in Liverpool last week where rooms cost £179 per week and it was a 50 week contract.
    You get a 32" Smart TV on the wall and en-suite with tiny kitchen with all mod cons and a gym downstairs but OMG that is expensive for LIVERPOOL and 22 square meters. RICH STUDENTS maybe
    • Annabee
    • By Annabee 6th Sep 13, 12:36 AM
    • 596 Posts
    • 454 Thanks
    Annabee
    • #7
    • 6th Sep 13, 12:36 AM
    • #7
    • 6th Sep 13, 12:36 AM
    Sounds like Manchester Uni are protecting the interests of their students, and a good thing too! I only wish more universities did the same.

    I think the reason most students only live in university-owed accommodation for the first year is because the universities usually only offer it to 1st years, except in exceptional circumstances. They do not have the capacity to offer it to all students. At least this was the case in every university we visited.
    • Annabee
    • By Annabee 6th Sep 13, 3:02 AM
    • 596 Posts
    • 454 Thanks
    Annabee
    • #8
    • 6th Sep 13, 3:02 AM
    • #8
    • 6th Sep 13, 3:02 AM
    Some universities (Kent cannot be the only university doing this) charge the absolute maximum possible for their accommodation. My daughter's WHOLE loan/grant for her first year was needed to pay her rent for the university accommodation. We needed to pay her a weekly allowance (so that she could eat, and so on!). This is a very common situation for students throughout the country, I believe. So not only do they leave university with a large student loan debt, but also they have had to find work (possibly to the detriment of their studies) and/or rely on their families, to meet living costs. What about those whose families are unable or unwilling to help?

    I think universities should feel some duty of care to their students, not use them as cash cows.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 6th Sep 13, 5:51 AM
    • 38,998 Posts
    • 162,542 Thanks
    silvercar
    • #9
    • 6th Sep 13, 5:51 AM
    • #9
    • 6th Sep 13, 5:51 AM
    Please check out the code of standards that many university housing offices now require.
    Many lenders do not allow BTL mortgages when renting to groups of students, many insurance companies will not provide Landlord insurance for student properties.
    Councils in many parts of the country are using Article 4 and planning objections to stop small student developments ( but not huge ones !!!)
    Fire safety,gas safety, electrical safety checks/ certificates, PAT testing, energy saving measures, security measures, demands from students and Parents for a safe, clean property with all mod cons, Fast internet, Sky or BT sport, dishwasher, American fridge freezer, location and all the student nightlife in walking distance.
    Property prices are higher in student areas and higher maintenance Every year.
    Originally posted by dimbo61
    Different world. Speaking as we go into the 6th year of one of my offspring being in student accommodation half that list is redundant.

    Yes to safety checks, never known a student to be concerned with energy saving measures. The students sort out an Internet and TV contract for themselves, never seen an American fridge freezer on the list and only in one year was a dishwasher part of the deal.

    Location is important for students, possibly the most important factor.

    With the cost incurred as students and the private halls that have emerged over the last few years and that more than ever students are choosing to live at home, some towns are over populated with private house lets. The rent may be higher if let to students, but the risks of having an empty property in certain towns is greater; if you don't let for September there is a high risk of the property being empty for the whole year!
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 6th Sep 13, 5:57 AM
    • 38,998 Posts
    • 162,542 Thanks
    silvercar
    Some universities (Kent cannot be the only university doing this) charge the absolute maximum possible for their accommodation. My daughter's WHOLE loan/grant for her first year was needed to pay her rent for the university accommodation. We needed to pay her a weekly allowance (so that she could eat, and so on!). This is a very common situation for students throughout the country, I believe. So not only do they leave university with a large student loan debt, but also they have had to find work (possibly to the detriment of their studies) and/or rely on their families, to meet living costs. What about those whose families are unable or unwilling to help?

    I think universities should feel some duty of care to their students, not use them as cash cows.
    Originally posted by Annabee
    I agree with your costings. Most students need to find some work or rely on their parents.

    Generally students from the poorest families get a lot of help in terms of bursaries from the universities, they also of course get a loan/ grant combination which is higher.

    According to both my kids, you either need to have parents willing and able to support you or come from the lowest income group, where the grants and burseries are considerable. It is the offspring of the squeezed middle who suffer.
    • anselld
    • By anselld 6th Sep 13, 7:15 AM
    • 6,275 Posts
    • 6,088 Thanks
    anselld
    My daughter's WHOLE loan/grant for her first year was needed to pay her rent for the university accommodation. We needed to pay her a weekly allowance (so that she could eat, and so on!). This is a very common situation for students throughout the country, I believe. So not only do they leave university with a large student loan debt, but also they have had to find work (possibly to the detriment of their studies) and/or rely on their families, to meet living costs. What about those whose families are unable or unwilling to help?
    Originally posted by Annabee
    If you plug zero parental income into the student loan calculator ...
    https://www.gov.uk/student-finance-calculator
    you get £3823 maintenance loan plus £3354 grant, giving a total living allowance of £7177. At the other end of the income scale you get maintenance loan of £3575.
    So presumably there is a built in assumption that the difference (£3602) will be contributed from parental income.


    I think universities should feel some duty of care to their students, not use them as cash cows.
    Originally posted by Annabee
    I agree, though it is arguably the Government who are the main culprits.
    • JencParker
    • By JencParker 6th Sep 13, 7:32 AM
    • 942 Posts
    • 1,531 Thanks
    JencParker
    Again please have a look on the Manchster Student Homes website re summer rent !!! and also the standard of room/property you need to be an ACCREDITED LANDLORD
    Yes you can make more money from renting out rooms to students rather than renting a family home to a family BUT there is much more work involved, Families can and often do stay long term and not move out after 10/12 months.
    By offering a high standard of property and reasonable rents with extras ( SKY/BT) we have no problems getting and keeping tenants
    FEES please read the MSH website re FEES ( only rent and deposit allowed) LETTING AGENTS have nice shiny offices and staff to pay!!
    Universties provide there own accommodation and charge what they want which is why many students get together and live in shared houses
    for the second/third years.
    Supply and Demand govern the costs of student rentals.
    I looked at a new student development in Liverpool last week where rooms cost £179 per week and it was a 50 week contract.
    You get a 32" Smart TV on the wall and en-suite with tiny kitchen with all mod cons and a gym downstairs but OMG that is expensive for LIVERPOOL and 22 square meters. RICH STUDENTS maybe
    Originally posted by dimbo61
    The reason why students live in shared houses for the second/third years is that universities only provide accommodation for the first year, so they have to. The exceptions are Oxford, Cambridge and Durham who have a colliagiate system.

    My daughter spent more on shared private rented accommodation during years 2 & 3 than she did in halls, which was of a very good standard although I appreciate it varies from university to university.

    The accommodation was generally poor and every room was used (living room and dining room were bedrooms). Continual problems with damp and they did have internet access, however, they had to organise and pay for this themselves. And they too had to pay rent from July when the tenancy started, albeit reduced, but did not have access to the property until September.
    Last edited by JencParker; 06-09-2013 at 7:35 AM.
    • Pincher
    • By Pincher 6th Sep 13, 10:53 AM
    • 6,516 Posts
    • 2,491 Thanks
    Pincher
    Clear a ground, put up some tents, call it Glastonbury in Kent,
    charge £10 a night, including Wi-Fi.

    Move the site every two weeks, burn it all down, bull dozer it flat, and start again.
  • GeneHunt
    My daughter(or "we") will be paying £390 per month this year. The property she and her 6 housemates are renting is seriously plush and is a very high spec (massive flat screen wall mounted TV, american fridge, flash kitchen & bathroom etc)

    She's happy and it must be good money for the land lord / lady = £390 * 7 * 12 = £32,760 per year income from a property in an area where you can buy a a 3 bed house for as little as £60k....

    ...it's no wonder the land lords and ladies have moved to providing such high quality accommodation - they'd be crazy not to!

    Not do I blame any student for not wanting to live like a hobo...

    *just sayin*
    Last edited by GeneHunt; 06-09-2013 at 11:25 AM.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 6th Sep 13, 4:28 PM
    • 38,998 Posts
    • 162,542 Thanks
    silvercar
    If you plug zero parental income into the student loan calculator ...
    https://www.gov.uk/student-finance-calculator
    you get £3823 maintenance loan plus £3354 grant, giving a total living allowance of £7177. At the other end of the income scale you get maintenance loan of £3575.
    So presumably there is a built in assumption that the difference (£3602) will be contributed from parental.
    Originally posted by anselld

    Plus those on the maximum maintenance grant also get extra help from the universities themselves, hence the request on student finance applications to allow them to share your information with the uni. As an example, at Manchester University, they would get £3000.

    http://www.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/studentfinance/home-eu-2013/university-scholarships-and-bursaries/
    • rev_henry
    • By rev_henry 7th Sep 13, 12:43 PM
    • 4,875 Posts
    • 2,065 Thanks
    rev_henry
    Yes to safety checks, never known a student to be concerned with energy saving measures. The students sort out an Internet and TV contract for themselves, never seen an American fridge freezer on the list and only in one year was a dishwasher part of the deal.

    Location is important for students, possibly the most important factor.

    With the cost incurred as students and the private halls that have emerged over the last few years and that more than ever students are choosing to live at home, some towns are over populated with private house lets. The rent may be higher if let to students, but the risks of having an empty property in certain towns is greater; if you don't let for September there is a high risk of the property being empty for the whole year!
    Originally posted by silvercar
    I'm very concerned with energy saving measures, bills are a fortune! But then again I'm probably not normal for a student. Landlords think I'm bizarre actually wanting to see the EPC! Internet contracts can be a right pain if you only want them for 9 months - I know virgin does 9 month student deals but they're more expensive than just paying for 12 months on a normal contract! I've insisted on a dishwasher for the past 3 years but just because I hate washing up. A friend came to stay the other day and was positively outraged that we have a dishwasher in a 2 person flat! I'm not overly bothered about location (though I was for the first year or two) - I'd rather save money by moving a bit further out. Also if one lives in student central you WILL be disturbed by drunk 'fellow students' parading up and down the road 247. I know there's a LOT of empty properties around Manchester student areas. Students here sort their houses out stupidly early and landlords/agents encourage this for obvious reasons. I've heard of groups getting together at the end of freshers week...seriously! Hence my last shared house we waited until a little later in the year and snapped up a bargain as the landlords were getting desperate. Although the agents for said property turned out to be shysters. If you walked around the student areas today you would find properties ready to go for probably sub £50pppw!


    I agree with your costings. Most students need to find some work or rely on their parents.

    Generally students from the poorest families get a lot of help in terms of bursaries from the universities, they also of course get a loan/ grant combination which is higher.

    According to both my kids, you either need to have parents willing and able to support you or come from the lowest income group, where the grants and burseries are considerable. It is the offspring of the squeezed middle who suffer.
    Originally posted by silvercar
    Completely agree with this. If you're on the top grant/bursary bracket you don't need a penny from your parents unless you're a !!!!less idiot (which a lot of students are!).

    The reason why students live in shared houses for the second/third years is that universities only provide accommodation for the first year, so they have to. The exceptions are Oxford, Cambridge and Durham who have a colliagiate system.

    My daughter spent more on shared private rented accommodation during years 2 & 3 than she did in halls, which was of a very good standard although I appreciate it varies from university to university.

    The accommodation was generally poor and every room was used (living room and dining room were bedrooms). Continual problems with damp and they did have internet access, however, they had to organise and pay for this themselves. And they too had to pay rent from July when the tenancy started, albeit reduced, but did not have access to the property until September.
    Originally posted by JencParker
    Starting rent in July is standard round here unfortunately, although one can usually negotiate for July & August half price. I have always had access to the property though.

    I am continually shocked by how much friends at Oxford have to pay for accommodation. One is paying almost the same for a college room (albeit including bills, but not catered) as we are for a nice 2 bed flat with secure parking. I know the colleges have very old buildings that cost a fortune to maintain, but frankly that's their problem.

    There is a massive disparity between the North and the South. Another friend is sharing a tiny 2 bed flat which is about £1000 a month in total, but that's VERY central London so isn't really comparable to anything else. Meanwhile another friend is paying something ridiculous like £40 a week in Bradford for a half decent house.
    • rev_henry
    • By rev_henry 7th Sep 13, 12:49 PM
    • 4,875 Posts
    • 2,065 Thanks
    rev_henry
    Plus those on the maximum maintenance grant also get extra help from the universities themselves, hence the request on student finance applications to allow them to share your information with the uni. As an example, at Manchester University, they would get £3000.

    http://www.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/studentfinance/home-eu-2013/university-scholarships-and-bursaries/
    Originally posted by silvercar
    They must have changed that when the higher fees came in. Used to be £3000 if you were poor AND got AAA at A-level. Otherwise £1250 if you were 'just' poor. I actually paid for a remark of one A level to try to get a 3rd A. Mark didn't change.
    • dimbo61
    • By dimbo61 7th Sep 13, 1:47 PM
    • 10,252 Posts
    • 5,561 Thanks
    dimbo61
    Henry hope you are happy being a student in Manchester and yes you are right that students get together just after they arrive at uni to look for student properties for 2/3 rd years.
    MSH have had to start posting adverts from Good Landlords in October due to Demand from students !
    When you have groups of 6/8/10 students looking for a property to live together there are only so many good ones.
    Students now want All-Inclusive for everything. Would you fancy getting £150/200 off all your fellow tenants the week before Xmas after the bill arrived and it was in your Name !
    You can pay £50 PPPW but you and I know what you will get ?
    Just make sure you have insurance and enjoy living in poor conditions.
    More and more new build tower blocks going up in central Manchester encouraged by the council charging £120-180 a week on 48/50 week contracts from Private Student companies.
  • fionajbanana
    I graduated 10 years ago and I paid £75 pw for my house share with 2 mature students. I went for mature students as I was 19-21, but got a mind and attitude which was 10-15 years older than I am. Still is the case now. I don't do noisy parties, I go to bed at 10:30-11pm and wake up 7am etc.

    Now students want wifi, ensuite bathrooms, loads of plug points etc which all cost extra MONEY for the LL and guess where they need to get the extra money from - yep, the students or their parents!


    Gone have the days where 8 students had one toilet and shower between them all. Gone the days where your room had just two plug points - my friends had that. I think I had 8 plug points in my room - 4 in the desk area.

    There are some uni halls of res that are still catered. My cousin was in one and it was bloody stupid! Evening meal was at 5:30pm. So if you had a 4pm or 5pm lecture - you missed it! Breakfast was 8am - again if you had a 9am lecture - you missed it! Plus if I had my evening meal at 5:30pm, I would get hungry later on.
    • rev_henry
    • By rev_henry 7th Sep 13, 2:33 PM
    • 4,875 Posts
    • 2,065 Thanks
    rev_henry
    Henry hope you are happy being a student in Manchester and yes you are right that students get together just after they arrive at uni to look for student properties for 2/3 rd years.
    MSH have had to start posting adverts from Good Landlords in October due to Demand from students ! I know, its insane! I understand they used to not issue the lists until January or something, but students sadly went elsewhere instead of waiting so they stopped it
    When you have groups of 6/8/10 students looking for a property to live together there are only so many good ones. Yeah that's true, there are ample 4 bed places but many more than that and you'll struggle. Someone at MSH once told me about a group coming into the office and saying 'Do you have any TWENTY SEVEN BEDROOM houses!!' The entire halls floor had decided they were best mates and all wanted to live together.
    Students now want All-Inclusive for everything. Would you fancy getting £150/200 off all your fellow tenants the week before Xmas after the bill arrived and it was in your Name ! Personally I've always been in charge of the bills (but of course not all in my name) as I don't trust anyone else to get the cheapest deal. I'd rather faff around with bills if its saving us £50 a month over an all inclusive place. I've never had a problem as I've always tried to live with people I really know and trust. Maybe I'm just lucky.
    You can pay £50 PPPW but you and I know what you will get ?
    Just make sure you have insurance and enjoy living in poor conditions. Yeah, the particular place I had in mind looked a complete shed. For the record I do not and have never lived in such a dwelling.
    More and more new build tower blocks going up in central Manchester encouraged by the council charging £120-180 a week on 48/50 week contracts from Private Student companies.
    Originally posted by dimbo61
    Are you thinking of that 'Student Castle' place? I had a brief look at their website but the rent was utterly ludicrous! Why does the council want them?!
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,813Posts Today

6,641Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • RT @MartinSLewis: YOU DO NOT NEED YOUR POLLING CARD TO VOTE! Just go to your polling station - don't be wrongly put off. Please spread the?

  • Today's Twitter Poll: Will you be voting in tomorrows European elections? If so will it be for a party you've no? https://t.co/YJ9XqAZ8u4

  • This is a very useful and interesting, factual piece about what the PM's new Brexit proposals mean and how new they? https://t.co/qM1bCz6FZp

  • Follow Martin