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  • FIRST POST
    Ted_Hutchinson
    Elderflower Cordial
    • #1
    • 18th Jun 05, 3:48 PM
    Elderflower Cordial 18th Jun 05 at 3:48 PM
    Didn't know where to put this and as Elderflowers are at their prime and so right now is the time to make it.

    20 large heads of elderflower
    4lb gran sugar
    75g Citric acid (from chemist, health food or wine/beer makers store, you may have to ask as it's sometimes kept under the counter. I think druggies have a use for it)
    2 lemons

    Remove flowers from green stalks with a pair of scissors into a large bowl.
    Place sugar in a pan with 2 pints of water Bring gently up to the boil stirring till sugar is disolved
    Pour over elderflowers and stir in citric acid.
    Add grated zest of lemons
    Then slice lemons and add slices to the bowl.
    Cover leave for 24 hrs
    Strain through muslin and pour into sterilised bottles.
    Store in cool place.

    To use dilute to taste with water but very good with gin or fizzy water. Can also be poured over pancakes or used as the bought Belvoir Elderflower cordial.

    Another varient of this is Elderflower and Organge Cordial
    25 heads of elderflower
    1.35 kg of sugar
    50g Tartaric acid (cream of tartar)
    1 sliced lemon
    4 sliced oranges
    1.7 litres water

    Separate flowers from stalks as above and bring to boil in water in a large pan.
    When cooled add all the other ingredients to pan.
    leave for 24 hrs
    Strain and bottle as above.

    The bowl you leave the elderflowers to stand in 24hrs needs to be at least 4 litres or you will have to divide it into two bowls. Also it needs to be acid resistant ie:Stainless steel, glass, pot, not aluminium.
    Last edited by Ted_Hutchinson; 18-06-2005 at 4:37 PM.
Page 1
    • arkonite_babe
    • By arkonite_babe 18th Jun 05, 5:32 PM
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    arkonite_babe
    • #2
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:32 PM
    • #2
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:32 PM
    Can anyone tell me how I identify elderflowers? I like the cordial and would love to try making it but I'm scared incase I pick the wrong thing and poison everyone
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 18th Jun 05, 5:38 PM
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    squeaky
    • #3
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:38 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:38 PM
    Here you are:-

    http://www.lethamshank.co.uk/Gallery/gal/Wildlife/elderflower.JPG

    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 18th Jun 05, 5:43 PM
    • 3,286 Posts
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    apprentice tycoon
    • #4
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:43 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:43 PM
    Can anyone tell me how I identify elderflowers? I like the cordial and would love to try making it but I'm scared incase I pick the wrong thing and poison everyone
    by arkonite_babe
    Squeaky's picture is good, you will also recognise the smell but be a bit careful where you pick them, roadside ones will have picked up traffic fumes
    • arkonite_babe
    • By arkonite_babe 18th Jun 05, 5:43 PM
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    arkonite_babe
    • #5
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:43 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:43 PM
    Now squeaky I'm going to be dense here. Do they grow as a bush or what? There are things like this growing in ditches near me but I'm convinced that they are a similar looking weed thing. That's why I'm scared to pick them. They don't smell anything like the elderflower scent either, or does the scent only come out after you do whatever with it.
    • arkonite_babe
    • By arkonite_babe 18th Jun 05, 5:44 PM
    • 7,259 Posts
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    arkonite_babe
    • #6
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:44 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:44 PM
    Cross posted tycoon and you've answered my query, I think
    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 18th Jun 05, 5:52 PM
    • 3,286 Posts
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    apprentice tycoon
    • #7
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:52 PM
    • #7
    • 18th Jun 05, 5:52 PM
    The scent comes out when the weather is right, sometimes on a still warm day, and yes, they are a like a weed that grows in hedgerows and ditches. They seed themselves easily so travel around where there is no-one to stop them, if you look how the ones you have seen grow you should see many stems growing from the ground

    edit....I just picked some that overhangs our garden, each flower has 5 petals and 5 spikey anthers (?)
    Last edited by apprentice tycoon; 18-06-2005 at 5:58 PM.
  • Ted_Hutchinson
    • #8
    • 18th Jun 05, 6:30 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Jun 05, 6:30 PM
    I should have pointed out that Elder is a hedgerow small tree or bush. So the growth comes from a woody trunk.
    You should check them for fragrance before picking.
    They do vary and some smell a bit like cats pee so avoid those and only pick those that a pleasently fragrent.
    Best picked in full sun, so tomorrow morning should be just right.
    • maryb
    • By maryb 18th Jun 05, 10:38 PM
    • 3,993 Posts
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    maryb
    • #9
    • 18th Jun 05, 10:38 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Jun 05, 10:38 PM
    what's the difference between elderflowers, ground elder and cow parsley?

    (sorry if it's a silly question - I'm an urban girl, well suburban anyway, but i recognise ground elder all right!! can't get rid of the [..... ]stuff from the garden)
  • ravenlooney
    Hi, Can I just check before I poison my family , are there any poisonous plants that look like elderflower? Im only double checking cos I remember when I was young being told not to pick flowers which look like the ones in Squeakys post cos they were poisonous. Or was that my mum just being paranoid and telling my to pick nothing in case I did pick something dodgy? I think I might have millions of elderflower growing in my untamed garden ...yay
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 19th Jun 05, 8:27 AM
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    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    Elder (sambucus nigra) is a shrub that makes about ten feet with a corky bark. Leaves are usually in groups of five, large, dark green and slightly toothed. Flowers are umbrels (umbrella like clusters to you and me) of numerous cream white flowers. (it is suggested that you check flowers for insects but do not wash them as this removes most of the fragrance)

    http://caliban.mpiz-koeln.mpg.de/~stueber/lindman/62.jpg

    http://www.diplomlandespfleger.de/Bilder/Baum/sambucusnigra.jpg

    Ground Elder (aegopodium podagraria) Found in shady places, a hairless perennial forming large patches 30-100cm 12-40in high. Leaves finely toothed in groups of three at the end of leaf stems. Flowers are white umbrels on a creeping hairless stem.

    http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed/pictures/p01/images/aegopodium-podagraria.jpg

    http://www.toyen.uio.no/botanisk/nbf/plantefoto/aegopodium_podagraria_Norman_Hagen01.jpg


    Cow Parsley (anthriscus sylvestris) An erect leafy perennial about 1m 3ft high with hollow green furrowed stems hairy near the bottom of the plant and smooth above. Leaves are grass green, slightly downy and much divided resembling wedge shaped ferns. Flowers tiny white in umbrels.

    http://www.kulak.ac.be/facult/wet/biologie/pb/kulakbiocampus/lage%20planten/Anthriscus%20sylvestris%20-%20Fluitenkruid/anthriscus%20sylvestris-fluitenkruid-01.jpg

    http://www.aphotoflora.com/Anthriscus%20sylvestris%20-%20Cow%20Parsley%20-%2002-05-04.jpg


    Parts of each of these are edible in the proper season - though it's easy to confuse Cow Parsley with Fool's Parsley and Hemlock so you should have a good field guide to hand when picking.

    Most of these details came from my very handy Collin's Gem version of Food For Free by Richard Mabey
    Last edited by squeaky; 19-06-2005 at 9:44 AM.
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
  • ravenlooney
    Duh ...it seems that its cow parsley littering my garden but now im elderflower in the brain so need to go and hunt some down!! Would you reccomend the Collins Gem food for free book then Squeaky?
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 20th Jun 05, 8:25 AM
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    squeaky
    Yes, gladly. It tells you which part of which flowers you can eat and when and often gives tips on preparation too.

    As you can see, the descriptions are good, the pictures and drawings are spot on - and if you're in any doubt you can look up more images by using the latin name in a google image search (which is what I did earlier in the thread)

    My copy was 2nd hand from Amazon 2 ish, as opposed to 4.99

    The title is Food for Free

    Collins gem edition

    by Richard Mabey

    ISBN 0-00-718303-8
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
    • maryb
    • By maryb 20th Jun 05, 9:05 PM
    • 3,993 Posts
    • 49,555 Thanks
    maryb
    Elder (sambucus nigra) is a shrub that makes about ten feet with a corky bark. Leaves are usually in groups of five, large, dark green and slightly toothed. Flowers are umbrels (umbrella like clusters to you and me) of numerous cream white flowers. (it is suggested that you check flowers for insects but do not wash them as this removes most of the fragrance)

    http://caliban.mpiz-koeln.mpg.de/~stueber/lindman/62.jpg

    http://www.diplomlandespfleger.de/Bilder/Baum/sambucusnigra.jpg

    Ground Elder (aegopodium podagraria) Found in shady places, a hairless perennial forming large patches 30-100cm 12-40in high. Leaves finely toothed in groups of three at the end of leaf stems. Flowers are white umbrels on a creeping hairless stem.

    http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed/pictures/p01/images/aegopodium-podagraria.jpg

    http://www.toyen.uio.no/botanisk/nbf/plantefoto/aegopodium_podagraria_Norman_Hagen01.jpg


    Cow Parsley (anthriscus sylvestris) An erect leafy perennial about 1m 3ft high with hollow green furrowed stems hairy near the bottom of the plant and smooth above. Leaves are grass green, slightly downy and much divided resembling wedge shaped ferns. Flowers tiny white in umbrels.

    http://www.kulak.ac.be/facult/wet/biologie/pb/kulakbiocampus/lage%20planten/Anthriscus%20sylvestris%20-%20Fluitenkruid/anthriscus%20sylvestris-fluitenkruid-01.jpg

    http://www.aphotoflora.com/Anthriscus%20sylvestris%20-%20Cow%20Parsley%20-%2002-05-04.jpg


    Parts of each of these are edible in the proper season - though it's easy to confuse Cow Parsley with Fool's Parsley and Hemlock so you should have a good field guide to hand when picking.

    Most of these details came from my very handy Collin's Gem version of Food For Free by Richard Mabey
    by squeaky

    Thanks very much for this.

    Don't suppose you know how to get rid of ground elder (or bindweed) among all your other accomplishments.....??!
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 20th Jun 05, 9:11 PM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    Ground elder - you cook like spinach it has a tangy aromatic flavour and was probably introduced here by the romans!

    I'm not sure about Bindweed - it's not listed in my book - but a google on it tells me that the latin name is different to the one I have for ground elder.

    They ain't the same animal, honest
    Last edited by squeaky; 20-06-2005 at 9:14 PM.
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
  • Rage in Eden
    before retiring (as i like to call sloping off to bed) I have informed OH that we will be going for a countryside walk down the lane near our house this week and picking elderflowers for cordial the making of. he didn't look that interested but I've got to be enthusiastic when he gets his telescope set up so it's an even trade................. edlerberry syrup is also very good for coughs so i shall try and leave some flowers on the tree to develop for when I'm back!
  • ravenlooney
    Yes, gladly. It tells you which part of which flowers you can eat and when and often gives tips on preparation too.

    As you can see, the descriptions are good, the pictures and drawings are spot on - and if you're in any doubt you can look up more images by using the latin name in a google image search (which is what I did earlier in the thread)

    My copy was 2nd hand from Amazon 2 ish, as opposed to 4.99

    The title is Food for Free

    Collins gem edition

    by Richard Mabey

    ISBN 0-00-718303-8
    by squeaky
    And guess what my fab husband brought me a copy of back from our local recycling yard today . And it is a fab book .... I cant wait to get out there and see what I can feed us all
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 20th Jun 05, 9:34 PM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    Wahey - result!
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
    • buffers
    • By buffers 20th Jun 05, 9:41 PM
    • 1,201 Posts
    • 65 Thanks
    buffers
    Food for Free
    Wahey - result!
    by squeaky
    Just come in on this one. We have the book and have done 'Pickled Ash Keys' and quite a few other recipes. Deeeeeeeelicious.
    Jesus loves you Everybody else thinks you're an idiot:rolleyes:
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 21st Jun 05, 7:51 AM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    I've still got to sit and peruse it with with intent. I'm one of those people who can only name six plants so I'll have to have a good idea of what I'm looking for before wandering out book in hand.

    The other day I almost joined the what have you eaten from your garden thread because I was going to pick some dandelion leaves for a salad - but the slugs and snails had beaten me to it! Bah humbug!
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
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