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    • epm-84
    • By epm-84 16th Jul 13, 3:21 PM
    • 1,415 Posts
    • 4,346 Thanks
    epm-84
    • #2
    • 16th Jul 13, 3:21 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Jul 13, 3:21 PM
    How much extra though and is the British alternative better alternative?

    If good quality British clothing was available for more than cheap foreign imports then yes I'd pay extra but I wouldn't pay something like double for buying British.
  • Lagoon
    • #3
    • 16th Jul 13, 3:24 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Jul 13, 3:24 PM
    I don't care for buying British, as such. I do pay slightly more, and go out of my way sometimes, to buy from independent local retailers. I try to support them where I can, though finances and time constraints generally dictate that I go to Tesco. Buying local is a rare treat.

    I have affinity with the small retailer, not the 'British' one.
    • danechip
    • By danechip 16th Jul 13, 4:13 PM
    • 51 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    danechip
    • #4
    • 16th Jul 13, 4:13 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Jul 13, 4:13 PM
    No such thing any more, It's all Eastern Europeans making the products anyway. The ones on job seekers lacking the said 'taken work' has to make do with value !!!!! imported anyway. Go figure !!
    • Cabbagewhite
    • By Cabbagewhite 16th Jul 13, 4:14 PM
    • 81 Posts
    • 97 Thanks
    Cabbagewhite
    • #5
    • 16th Jul 13, 4:14 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Jul 13, 4:14 PM
    With food we always try to buy British whenever possible and will only buy British asparagus, strawberries, raspberries and pears. That is because they are not picked at the correct time for flavour, but to aid transportation and longevity. I come from a long line of market gardeners and farmers, my late father also used to work for one of the largest fruit and veg importers for many years, so there is not much we don't know about most fruit and veg. We prefer other food to come from the UK or Ireland because of ethical animal treatment and farming practices. Next choice is Europe, after that it is Fairtrade (especially bananas). There is usually only a few pence difference in the cost. If there is a big difference in cost we will sometimes buy the cheapest, or sometimes go without. We have a very tight budget and still manage to go by this at least 80% of the time (probably more).

    With regard to other items, I'd love to buy more items that aren't from China or some other developing nation. I would pay slightly more for a product that was made in the UK as long as the quality was good enough. I think big business makes too large a profit at the expense of ethical working conditions and UK jobs. There is a balance to be made, but I think overall they are too greedy and are after every last penny of profit - the recent factory collapse in Bangladesh is a good illustration of this. We have exported our manufacturing along with any health and safety and responsibility. This in turn makes it difficult for any new manufacturing to get going in UK.
    • billshep
    • By billshep 16th Jul 13, 5:24 PM
    • 57 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    billshep
    • #6
    • 16th Jul 13, 5:24 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Jul 13, 5:24 PM
    As others suggest, this is quite a difficult one:
    How much more would you pay - if it's a small proportion of the cost then definitely;
    Is the product is better or at least as good - e.g. fruit and veg will tend to be fresher and picked at the optimum time then yes, however the environmental impact from 'out of season' veg may be higher if sourced in the UK due to cost of heating greenhouses;
    Ffor electronics, how much of it is UK sourced - many components are likely to be produced overseas;
    Also is it a UK company or just a UK factory - if a factory then at least we get jobs in the UK, but other profits (and taxes?) likely to go overseas...;
    And then as Lagoon says, who do you buy it from - often the labelling is less good in independent retailers (esp. Fruit and Veg) and at the weekends they are too busy to ask whether things are sourced in the UK.
    I'm mainly with Cabbagewhite on buying Fruit and Veg - buy UK if in season, if not do without or as near as possible or fair trade - definitely not buying Peruvian Asparagus!
    As for clothes, it's not that easy to source UK produced items at a sensible price or in your preferred style - a lot is 3 or 4 times the price of those from abroad... And things like fair trade for clothes you don't see so often as you do for food stuffs - or maybe I'm looking in the wrong place!
    • Mentox
    • By Mentox 17th Jul 13, 8:57 AM
    • 37 Posts
    • 26 Thanks
    Mentox
    • #7
    • 17th Jul 13, 8:57 AM
    • #7
    • 17th Jul 13, 8:57 AM
    When buying goods from other countries we pay money to them and the problem is that they don't buy from us. The result is that our economy shrinks and people get paid less or lose their jobs. And that causes those people to buy even more products that are cheaper (non-British).

    Of Course this isn't the only issue with our economy but it certainly doesn't help it either.
  • Sulevia
    • #8
    • 17th Jul 13, 1:38 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Jul 13, 1:38 PM
    Generally I would go for British especially in the food and drink department. Local where possible. Except for sugar where I buy Fair Trade cane sugar. Which is usually cheaper. British Sugar beet is processed by the monopoly British Sugar, the crop is not well suited to the British climate, and the processing is more fossil-fuel dependant than cane sugar.

  • simonne15
    • #9
    • 17th Jul 13, 4:54 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Jul 13, 4:54 PM
    Cabbagewhite, I agree and take a similar approach to checking where goods originates before deciding to buy. I'm so glad too that you reminded everyone that its the business owners who have, along with bankers, been too greedy for too long. To ask the general public whether we would pay more for UK produce is a mere distraction from the real underlying situation that you have made plain. It's gone on for generations from those who saw opportunity for profit in making uniforms and arms for the wars to rich developers building their mansions over land where there was coal, only to exploit hard working miners who risked their lives to bring it out.
    Like you I would willingly buy British if it were once again good quality and good value for money but not merely to increase the profits of the few. I think there's opportunity for creation of small family businesses which would thrive if the profit margins are kept reasonable. The more greed there is the more prices escalate and people have to go for the cheapest regardless of their principles (and thanks to Thatcher we now have generations of those who were brainwashed into the 'me, me, me- I want it now' culture).
    Last edited by simonne15; 17-07-2013 at 4:55 PM. Reason: Forgot to include name of person to whom I am replying.
    • StacFace
    • By StacFace 21st Jul 13, 6:08 PM
    • 356 Posts
    • 393 Thanks
    StacFace
    Personally I wouldn't, I don't see the point in paying more for something just because it was made closer to home. If I'm not going to notice the difference (and I often don't) then any extra I spend is just throwing money away.
    • dastep
    • By dastep 22nd Jul 13, 1:16 PM
    • 39 Posts
    • 61 Thanks
    dastep
    This is an interesting question in lieu of the recent bankruptcy filing of what used to be one of America's largest and richest cities Detroit.

    If people are really wondering what killed Detroit, they need look no further than the UAW or United Auto Workers Union.

    As recently as 2008, GM, Ford and Chrysler paid their employees on average more than $73 an hour in total compensation. The 12 foreign transplants, operating in nonunion states mostly in the South and Midwest, averaged about $42 an hour.

    I'm afraid that many great companies and products have also suffered here in Britain due to the influence of unions and unwillingness to negotiate labour rates and pay packages to allow corporations to compete on a world economy.

    The way to bring back British manufacturing is to get rid of the unions.
    Last edited by dastep; 22-07-2013 at 1:38 PM.
    • DKLS
    • By DKLS 23rd Jul 13, 9:49 AM
    • 12,761 Posts
    • 21,519 Thanks
    DKLS
    When it comes to Hi-Fi kit, I am more than happy to buy british, it is after all so much better than the foreign competition. Country of origin doesnt really play a factor in my buying decisions.
    • epm-84
    • By epm-84 7th Aug 13, 3:28 PM
    • 1,415 Posts
    • 4,346 Thanks
    epm-84
    Just remembered that when he launched MoneySavingExpert.com Martin Lewis outsourced it to Eastern European developers to get it built at a cut down £100 price.
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