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  • FIRST POST
    Badgergal
    Freezing fruit
    • #1
    • 7th Jun 05, 8:49 AM
    Freezing fruit 7th Jun 05 at 8:49 AM
    Hello all,

    I was having a read of a book I have about juices and smoothies, and was surprised to learn you can freeze fresh strawberries, raspberries etc to put into smoothies (blending them from frozen so no need for ice, also thickens the texture of the smoothie).

    This just never occurred to me and is so useful to know when the local market is selling three punnets of something in season for a pound and I know I will never get through them all before they go off! I hate waste so I thought I would share this (though you all probably knew, and it was just me it never occurred to?!)

Page 1
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 7th Jun 05, 9:48 AM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    • #2
    • 7th Jun 05, 9:48 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Jun 05, 9:48 AM
    While I know it can be done I've never had enough left over to freeze

    Firstly from making puds, pies and crumbles for the freezer, but also from making a jar, or two, of jam.
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

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    • 16011996
    • By 16011996 7th Jun 05, 12:03 PM
    • 8,140 Posts
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    16011996
    • #3
    • 7th Jun 05, 12:03 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Jun 05, 12:03 PM
    i find strawberries go soggy when you defrost them, but they are great for smoothies. raspberries freeze brilliantly as do blackberries, blueberries etc.
    • Ticklemouse
    • By Ticklemouse 7th Jun 05, 12:33 PM
    • 4,896 Posts
    • 5,486 Thanks
    Ticklemouse
    • #4
    • 7th Jun 05, 12:33 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Jun 05, 12:33 PM
    As a matter of interest, what do you lot use to make your smoothies? - equipment-wise I mean. I have a juicer but wanted to get into smoothies too, so as to eat the whole fruit. I have a stick blender and a blender on my Kenwood Chef (oooh, and one on my cheffette, if I can remember where that is)

    I have frozen bananas currently as well as bags of frozen berries, but thanks to the OP, didn't think about the strawbs.

    PS nice to see you again, 160
    • spendaholic
    • By spendaholic 7th Jun 05, 12:34 PM
    • 1,454 Posts
    • 7,664 Thanks
    spendaholic
    • #5
    • 7th Jun 05, 12:34 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Jun 05, 12:34 PM
    I use a blender.
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  • raeble
    • #6
    • 7th Jun 05, 12:58 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Jun 05, 12:58 PM
    I'm got that braun stick blender thing with all the attachments, so I use the big jug when I'm making smoothies - banana or two, yoghurt and frozen soft fruit. Lovely.
  • Badgergal
    • #7
    • 7th Jun 05, 1:13 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Jun 05, 1:13 PM
    I have a Kenwood Smoothie maker that cost about 20. I don't really know if it is the same as a blender as I have nothing to compare it to, but I like it, it's powerful and easy to clean. And silver. I have an ancient Braun stick blender with no attachments but as its old and not as powerful there is no way it could blend ice or frozen fruit the way the smoothie does, it is better for blending softer stuff.

    I guess the great thing about freezing fruit for smoothies is who cares what its like when it defrosts (ie soggy) as its getting whizzed up anyway. It will probably have more nutrients than if it was sitting going mouldy in my fridge for a week too.
  • trace-j
    • #8
    • 7th Jun 05, 1:27 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Jun 05, 1:27 PM
    Hello all,

    I was having a read of a book I have about juices and smoothies, and was surprised to learn you can freeze fresh strawberries, raspberries etc to put into smoothies (blending them from frozen so no need for ice, also thickens the texture of the smoothie).

    This just never occurred to me and is so useful to know when the local market is selling three punnets of something in season for a pound and I know I will never get through them all before they go off! I hate waste so I thought I would share this (though you all probably knew, and it was just me it never occurred to?!)

    by Badgergal
    Freezing fruit is hit and miss. The faster the food is frozen the smaller the ice crystals and the less cell damage to the fruit. Hence why household freezers take a lot longer and you're left with sloppy fruit upon defrosting. Amazing what you can learn from TV and the processes used to fast freeze peas!
    I got an idea, an idea so smart my head would explode if I even began to know what I was talking about
    • Ticklemouse
    • By Ticklemouse 7th Jun 05, 1:49 PM
    • 4,896 Posts
    • 5,486 Thanks
    Ticklemouse
    • #9
    • 7th Jun 05, 1:49 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Jun 05, 1:49 PM
    Freezing fruit is hit and miss. The faster the food is frozen the smaller the ice crystals and the less cell damage to the fruit. Hence why household freezers take a lot longer and you're left with sloppy fruit upon defrosting. Amazing what you can learn from TV and the processes used to fast freeze peas!
    by trace-j
    That would explain (perhaps) why my cauli tasted funny after I'd frozen it. Perhaps I won't try buying the market up and freezing it then Thanks for that.
  • Galtizz
    Can you freeze Aubergines? I ask because I got some out of the freezer this morning intending to have them for tea, if they don't come out right I'll have to re-think tea

    It's OK if they turn to mush because they're going in a pie, as long as they're not going to kill me
    When life hands you a lemon, make sure you ask for tequilla and salt
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 7th Jun 05, 2:10 PM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    There's a paper on freezing aubergine Here
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
  • KTFrugal
    Freezing Fruit
    You get the best results if you freeze berries on a baking sheet, then once they are frozen, package them up. This way, you don't get a big wodge of fruit mush when you want to use them up.

    Strawberries, alas, defy even this process. Make jam, instead...
    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 7th Jun 05, 4:21 PM
    • 3,286 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    apprentice tycoon
    In last months Country Living mag there were instructions for dried strawberries (like in Special K Red Berries etc) - slice them about 50mm thick, arrange them in a single layer, not touching, on baking parchment lines baking sheets. Dry in an oven on the lowest setting for around 12 hours, turning once. Store in a container in a cool dark place. They say to make sure that they really are dry or they may rot, lengthen the drying if needed.
    Haven't tried it but I will soon, I have 30+ strawberry plants all threatening to fruit at once....
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