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  • K8ee
    • #2
    • 29th Aug 12, 12:49 PM
    Make our own lunchboxes
    • #2
    • 29th Aug 12, 12:49 PM
    I was trying to post this on the breadmaker thread but have lost it.
    I make rolls with my breadmaker for lunchboxes. They are tailored in size the younger one has 12 rolls per batch of dough, the older has 8. They can have plain or flavoured bread - current favourite for the younger is a Hot Cross Bun fruit bread (without the crosses). I make the rolls and freeze them ready for use. Meanwhile, every Sunday evening they each make a (most frequently chocolate) Victoria Sandwich (or other cake if they prefer) which they decorate as they wish, and each day they take a piece of their own cake of the week. Lasts until Friday in airtight tin. They are excellent and creative cooks (aged 10 & 13). Making it for themselves gives them choice, cooking skills, and they eat it as they wanted it in the first place. We always have a cooked meal at teatime which I've made from meat/veg so I'm not too worried about the protein etc. which they will get later. They don't seem to have any pressure from others about content - probably because they enjoy what they have. Crisps? - just once a week - on the way to music lessons after school.
    • iwanttosavemoney2008
    • By iwanttosavemoney2008 29th Aug 12, 1:40 PM
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    iwanttosavemoney2008
    • #3
    • 29th Aug 12, 1:40 PM
    • #3
    • 29th Aug 12, 1:40 PM
    For me all i do is ask them what they would like on their sandwiches the night before, I ask which fruit they would like, them I make up a sandwich as per their fillings, add fruit requested, yoghurt (smart price), drink made up at home and put into their own bottle, bag of the cheapest crisps, and a cereal bar for their snack. Snack bars are bought and stocked up whenever they are on offer or can be bought very cheaply. Sometimes I will make flapjack or muffins etc which they have instead of crisps or cereal bar etc. Defo no chocolate though
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    • cutestkids
    • By cutestkids 29th Aug 12, 2:08 PM
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    cutestkids
    • #4
    • 29th Aug 12, 2:08 PM
    • #4
    • 29th Aug 12, 2:08 PM
    My two always have packed lunches as the school dinners are horrid.

    Some of the things they take are.

    Sandwiches or rolls filed with any of the following-

    Tuna
    Cheese
    Ham
    Salad
    Cheese spread such as Philly
    If I have done a roast chicken then use that in as well.

    Pots of humous, salsa, with pitta bread, veg sticks carrot, pepper, cucumber, celery.

    Tubs of chopped cheese with grapes and a few little mini sausages or sausage rolls.

    Wraps with various fillings.

    Always some fruit usually an apple with one other thing like a plum, a few strawberries or a small satsuma.

    Dried fruit, raisins, apricot etc.

    Fromage frais or yoghurt.

    Sometimes crisps or some pretzels, breadsticks or ritz crackers
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    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 29th Aug 12, 2:46 PM
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    Fire Fox
    • #5
    • 29th Aug 12, 2:46 PM
    • #5
    • 29th Aug 12, 2:46 PM
    Don't put more than ONE SMALL junk/ processed/ sugary/ fatty item in the lunchbox even if they are homemade. It is recommended that these comprise no more than 10% of daily calories which is a lot less than you might think, 150 to 200 calories per day depending on the age and appetite of the child.

    There are many different delicious dried fruits available now - my personal favourites are sour cherries, pears and sun dried (unsweetened) pineapple; nuts and seeds are packed with protein, minerals, fibre and healthy fats and go well with dried fruits. These can be made into flapjacks with jumbo oats, wheatgerm, creamed coconut instead of all butter, a little natural sugar substitutes such as xylitol or stevia.
    Last edited by Fire Fox; 29-08-2012 at 2:53 PM.
    What a difference a day makes, twenty four little hours.
    • gingin
    • By gingin 29th Aug 12, 3:47 PM
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    gingin
    • #6
    • 29th Aug 12, 3:47 PM
    • #6
    • 29th Aug 12, 3:47 PM
    I purchased a mini thermos a few years ago, DD takes hers every day.

    It's soup 9/10 times. I make one batch of soup a week and then freeze, so she can alternate what she has during the week. The soup is cheap, filling and nutritious and nice in winter when it's chilly. All she needs is a roll or cheese and crackers and that will fill her up for lunch. You can also fill with stews or pasta salad.
    • tinkerbel*79
    • By tinkerbel*79 29th Aug 12, 4:04 PM
    • 19 Posts
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    tinkerbel*79
    • #7
    • 29th Aug 12, 4:04 PM
    • #7
    • 29th Aug 12, 4:04 PM
    using a small screw on tupper wear pot. i put tinned or fresh fruit in the bottom topped up with jelly to cover fruit or custard or packet moose. can make up for the week. gwd for fruit avoiders.
    Bananas wont last a week without going brown.
  • potato_pizza
    • #8
    • 29th Aug 12, 4:10 PM
    • #8
    • 29th Aug 12, 4:10 PM
    When I was younger in winter my Dad used to pack me up a Thermos with a jacket potato wrapped in foil inside! It used to stay hot until lunch and was brilliant!
    • nzmegs
    • By nzmegs 29th Aug 12, 4:39 PM
    • 1,024 Posts
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    nzmegs
    • #9
    • 29th Aug 12, 4:39 PM
    • #9
    • 29th Aug 12, 4:39 PM
    If you really want your kids to be healthy and properly full up after their lunch - not high on sugar and carbs - try the following ideas:

    sliced ham, chicken or meat with a pot of full fat mayonnaise, a pot of berries with real whipped cream, full fat greek yoghurt with a sprinkling of chopped nuts, chicken legs or thighs with the skin on, a small pack of mixed nuts, sliced avocado salad or avocado dip with vegetables.

    Don't give them wheat based products like cakes, bread, wraps, rolls and the like. You are setting them up for diabetes and stomach complaints.

    Processed foods which are aimed at kids are often full of extra sugars - avoid them. Kids (and adults) need high fat foods with no sugar. Believe me you will see a reduction in poor concentration, bad behaviour and after school hunger.
    • retepetsir
    • By retepetsir 29th Aug 12, 4:46 PM
    • 1,112 Posts
    • 939 Thanks
    retepetsir
    If you really want your kids to be healthy and properly full up after their lunch - not high on sugar and carbs - try the following ideas:

    sliced ham, chicken or meat with a pot of full fat mayonnaise, a pot of berries with real whipped cream, full fat greek yoghurt with a sprinkling of chopped nuts, chicken legs or thighs with the skin on, a small pack of mixed nuts, sliced avocado salad or avocado dip with vegetables.

    Don't give them wheat based products like cakes, bread, wraps, rolls and the like. You are setting them up for diabetes and stomach complaints.

    Processed foods which are aimed at kids are often full of extra sugars - avoid them. Kids (and adults) need high fat foods with no sugar. Believe me you will see a reduction in poor concentration, bad behaviour and after school hunger.
    Originally posted by nzmegs
    Wheat based products will not give someone diabetes , its all about things in moderation.

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    • thegirlintheattic
    • By thegirlintheattic 29th Aug 12, 5:07 PM
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    thegirlintheattic
    Wraps with lots of salad and just a bit of meat. Flavoured mayo is good too.
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  • Joga6970
    Nzmegs what a disappointing comment:-

    "Don't give them wheat based products like cakes, bread, wraps, rolls and the like. You are setting them up for diabetes and stomach complaints".


    I have two daughters with type 1 diabetes (type 1 mainly affecting children) and it certainly wasn't because they ate wheat based products it's because their pancreas stopped working nothing to do with diet and there was nothing they could do to prevent it!!!!

    Also they can eat everything nothing is off limits as long as they count the carbs in the foods, really makes me angry reading comments like these do your research and you will see the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes
    • gardenia101
    • By gardenia101 29th Aug 12, 7:01 PM
    • 578 Posts
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    gardenia101
    Beware the lunchbox police...
    I purchased a mini thermos a few years ago, DD takes hers every day.
    Originally posted by gingin
    When I was younger in winter my Dad used to pack me up a Thermos with a jacket potato wrapped in foil inside! It used to stay hot until lunch and was brilliant!
    Originally posted by potato_pizza
    They sound like great ideas - sadly the food police at DS's primary don't allow any hot food/thermos flasks due to health & safety...

    They also don't allow chocolate in any shape or form - so HM choc cookies/muffins aren't allowed & neither are the cereal bars you can buy with choc chips in (not that I feed my kids chocolate all day but I'm a fan of the Weetabix Oatybars as they have much more fibre than others - not allowed)...

    Last year they banned any type of food that came in a packet (I kid you not) as they felt they were having problems with rubbish in the school playground. So no crisps, cheese strings, non-choc cereal bars.... As they always send all the rubbish home with each child in their lunchbox I felt this was a little extreme

    I'm all for giving my kids a healthy lunch, but if I've not had time to make my own flapjacks (or they've burnt again ) then I don't want to worrying that I'll be picked up by the head at home time. (Yes, she does comment in the playground in front of other parents as she says the "shame factor" works.)

    My DS's lunchbox is also left on a shelf that sits in full sunlight all day & even if I put 2 ice thingys in by lunchtime his food is usually warm so I'm reluctant to put chicken etc. in. He does love egg, but I was asked to stop this as one of the MDS ladies can't stand the smell of egg

    Good job he likes cheese really, & I'm glad he's off to high school next year & he can buy his own!

    Sorry no fab ideas - just wanted to point out that some schools can be less helpful than others. What did make me laugh though was what they fed my DS when he had free school meals a few years ago - white bread, cheap margarine, wafer ham sandwiches, a cake, 2 biscuits, a tiny yogurt or sometimes some fruit
    And I find that looking back at you gives a better view, a better view...
    • gingin
    • By gingin 29th Aug 12, 7:08 PM
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    gingin
    Gardenia, that really is health and safety gone mad. By lunch time thermos flasks have had food in them for 4 hours at least and are in no way dangerous. DD's is warm at best by lunch time and I do my very best to get it as hot as possible so it retains the heat. I'd kick up such a fuss if dd was denied hers, it's the perfect way of giving them warm, nutritious food without having to resort to poor quality and expensive school meals.
    • kas65uk
    • By kas65uk 29th Aug 12, 7:51 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    kas65uk
    No nuts please !
    Wow some schools are unhelpful ! My youngest's school dinners are much improved and he prefers them. The school doesn't allow crisps or sweets in pack-ups which seems fair enough.

    Don't mean to be a food nazi but can I remind people not to put nuts or nut products in their pack-ups. My young nephew nearly died last year after sudden onset of anaphylactic shock. He now has an epi-pen as a lot of kids do, but so many kids have nut allergies now, I just don't think it's worth the risk.

    Some good pack up ideas here though, thanks to posters
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 29th Aug 12, 8:07 PM
    • 23,979 Posts
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    Fire Fox
    Wow some schools are unhelpful ! My youngest's school dinners are much improved and he prefers them. The school doesn't allow crisps or sweets in pack-ups which seems fair enough.

    Don't mean to be a food nazi but can I remind people not to put nuts or nut products in their pack-ups. My young nephew nearly died last year after sudden onset of anaphylactic shock. He now has an epi-pen as a lot of kids do, but so many kids have nut allergies now, I just don't think it's worth the risk.

    Some good pack up ideas here though, thanks to posters
    Originally posted by kas65uk
    A child with peanut allergy can avoid the tree nuts to be on the safe side, but it's overkill for all schoolchildren to avoid such a healthy food group just in case one child has a previously undiagnosed rare anaphylactic reaction. If you were to do that you'd also ban the other 'common' food triggers for severe allergic reactions: milk, eggs, soy, wheat, fish and shellfish which doesn't actually leave you with much of a packed lunch.
    What a difference a day makes, twenty four little hours.
  • Lexi_Helms
    Lunches...
    I am not a parent, but I do pack the other half with a small pot of hummus, celery and carrot sticks and some crackers. He enjoys it as its a change to the usual wraps and sarnies!
    • kjmtidea
    • By kjmtidea 29th Aug 12, 9:15 PM
    • 1,348 Posts
    • 3,386 Thanks
    kjmtidea
    I make batches of fairy cakes and freeze them, then they are easy to just pop in their lunch boxes in the morning. I also do the same with sandwiches, make a load of them at the weekend with different fillings and then that is all 4 children sorted for the week

    They also have a yogurt, frubes get frozen in the summer, some fruit - sometimes a little pot with strawberries and grapes and another pot with cherry tomatoes in, my eldest loves a big pot of mixed salad.

    I just see what is on offer at the shops, get reduced bread for the sandwiches too.
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  • loopy-loo73
    my eldest has cafeteria so no problem there but the little one is starting school next week so packed lunches are a big adventure for her lol

    we've been practicing and we'll prob go with a sandwich (cheese/ham/peanut butter/honey/jam/choc spread) & a cake/cereal bar in the bottom of her box then yogurt, grapes, raisins in the top. maybe a babybel depending on what sandwich filling she has & perhaps some cucumber slices. she'll take juice made up at home.

    all her own choices & she's going to help make it the night before.

    lou x
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 29th Aug 12, 11:21 PM
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    onlyroz
    My son's school has a "no crisps or chocolate" rule for the lunchboxes. They have also introduced a "no nuts" rule because there is a child with a severe allergy.

    I usually go for the boring old sandwich, fruit and yoghurt combo, which seems to go down well enough. He also takes in a snack for when he is at the childminder in the afternoon, which is usually something like raisins or mini-cheddars.
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