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  • FIRST POST
    • lucylou
    • By lucylou 15th Jun 05, 1:53 PM
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    lucylou
    Freezing Mashed Potato
    • #1
    • 15th Jun 05, 1:53 PM
    Freezing Mashed Potato 15th Jun 05 at 1:53 PM
    hi i have a question I have used all my potatoes and mashed them and then froze them.Now what I did I used one slice (as i had put them in a try and cut them in slices) but when I defrosted one it was all full of water and tasted funny.Any suggestions to save the other ones please?Or to do something different next time?
    half scottish half italian :100%moneysaver
Page 5
    • martinthebandit
    • By martinthebandit 8th Oct 11, 12:14 PM
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    martinthebandit
    I think you would be better off making the cakes with fresh mash and then freezing.

    You can always reheat them in the toaster.

    If you don't find joy in the snow,
    remember you'll have less joy in your life


    ...but still have the same amount of snow!
    • MrsAtobe
    • By MrsAtobe 8th Oct 11, 12:32 PM
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    MrsAtobe
    Hi,
    When you are making your mash put your potatoes in the pan & put back on the heat for about 30 seconds to a minute to ensure they are dry (not too long so they stick or begin to catch). I find that helps.
    If my mash is ever a bit watery when I have defrosted it, I just drain the water off before I heat it & beat it .

    Hope this helps
    Originally posted by sianlee
    I have been draining off as much as I can, but the mash itself is still wet, iyswim. I end up using double the amount of flour that I should, and the mix is still too wet to use a cutter on. I end up having to dollop the mix into the frying pan, hence the comment about rustic potato cakes! I will try drying the mash out more before I freeze it though, thank you.

    I think you would be better off making the cakes with fresh mash and then freezing.

    You can always reheat them in the toaster.
    Originally posted by martinthebandit
    They wouldn't make it to the freezer in this house, the OH loves them too much.
    Good enough is good enough, and I am more than good enough!

    If all else fails, remember, keep calm and hug a spaniel!
    • Emuchops
    • By Emuchops 8th Oct 11, 3:27 PM
    • 791 Posts
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    Emuchops
    I will be interested to find the answer to this as I have the same problem-nice dry mash goes into the freezer-wet slop appears once defrosted-no idea where it comes from....

    (to dry it out I tend to wrap in clean teatowel and press).
  • sophistica
    Potatoes do not freeze. The reason why commercial/supermarket mash freezes is because they have either added a lot of fat to it or used reconstituted potato. I would google "freezing mashed potato" to see if there is a way round it.
    • tessie bear
    • By tessie bear 8th Oct 11, 5:52 PM
    • 4,364 Posts
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    tessie bear
    i dont know the answer but i had the same problem ...its a pain as i always do too much mash
    onwards and upwards
    • billywhizz
    • By billywhizz 8th Oct 11, 7:07 PM
    • 256 Posts
    • 195 Thanks
    billywhizz
    There's a thread here that suggests adding an egg?

    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/345395
    • VJsmum
    • By VJsmum 8th Oct 11, 7:15 PM
    • 5,590 Posts
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    VJsmum
    how do you make potato cakes?
    • meanmarie
    • By meanmarie 8th Oct 11, 7:23 PM
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    meanmarie
    I agree with sophistica....potatoes do not freeze, I have never yet eaten anything other than chipped potatoes that are good from frozen, and I'm Irish FGS, so I know all about potatoes, right?? I have tried commercially frozen and home frozen mash and it is just like 'gloop' for want of a better word, so I now just either carefully ration the amount I cook or saute leftovers the next day. I am sure that many of you will disagree and that's fine, but I knows what I likes and its not frozen mash!

    Marie
    Weight 08 February 86kg
  • becs
    How is it any different from making a shepherds pie with mash on top and freezing it? I do this regularly with no problems, i just wrap the pie in clingfilm and pop it in the freezer. Same with fish pie.
    • MrsAtobe
    • By MrsAtobe 8th Oct 11, 8:31 PM
    • 1,350 Posts
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    MrsAtobe
    how do you make potato cakes?
    Originally posted by VJsmum
    Here's the recipe I use:

    450g cooked potatoes
    25g melted butter
    3 tablespoons flour
    Salt and pepper
    40g butter for cooking

    Mash the potatoes, if necessary
    Add the melted butter, stir in the flour, salt and pepper.
    Turn the mixture onto a floured surface, and press out until 1cm thick.
    Cut out with 7.5cm cutter.
    Melt the cooking butter over a moderate heat, and then fry the cakes for approx 3 mins each side.

    HTH.
    Good enough is good enough, and I am more than good enough!

    If all else fails, remember, keep calm and hug a spaniel!
    • MrsAtobe
    • By MrsAtobe 8th Oct 11, 8:41 PM
    • 1,350 Posts
    • 4,398 Thanks
    MrsAtobe
    Potatoes do not freeze. The reason why commercial/supermarket mash freezes is because they have either added a lot of fat to it or used reconstituted potato. I would google "freezing mashed potato" to see if there is a way round it.
    Originally posted by sophistica
    I have googled it, and it looked like I was the only one having problems. And I do tend to use just butter in mash.

    How is it any different from making a shepherds pie with mash on top and freezing it? I do this regularly with no problems, i just wrap the pie in clingfilm and pop it in the freezer. Same with fish pie.
    Originally posted by becs
    Perhaps you make the mash drier to top a pie with, than you do to eat?

    i dont know the answer but i had the same problem ...its a pain as i always do too much mash
    Originally posted by tessie bear
    Lol, I always ask how many tatties the OH wants, and he always over estimates!
    Good enough is good enough, and I am more than good enough!

    If all else fails, remember, keep calm and hug a spaniel!
    • MrsAtobe
    • By MrsAtobe 8th Oct 11, 8:50 PM
    • 1,350 Posts
    • 4,398 Thanks
    MrsAtobe
    There's a thread here that suggests adding an egg?

    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/345395
    Originally posted by billywhizz
    Thanks, I'll give it a go, to see if it makes a difference and report back.
    Good enough is good enough, and I am more than good enough!

    If all else fails, remember, keep calm and hug a spaniel!
    • babyshoes
    • By babyshoes 8th Oct 11, 10:25 PM
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    babyshoes
    I find that you need to heat and stir it back in and it dries out a bit as you go, I use the microwave and stir every couple of mins. But I do like fairly moist mash in the first place!
    Trust me - I'm NOT a doctor!
    • lynzpower
    • By lynzpower 8th Oct 11, 10:31 PM
    • 24,743 Posts
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    lynzpower
    my tips for foolproof potato cakes is:

    1) never put milk in the mash
    2) never use margarine in the mix either.

    Take a bag of powdered mashed potato ( value is fine) scatter some on your work surface.

    With the warm mash knead in as much powdered mash as it will take and make it into a proper dough.

    You can also use plain flour but sometimes can leave a very dry texture.

    Pat them out on the surface and leave them to dry out.

    Then quickly fry, then freeze on a baking sheet then put into tupperwares.

    Then they can be fried grilled or oven from the freezer.

    enjoy!
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    • Steve-o
    • By Steve-o 8th Oct 11, 11:09 PM
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    Steve-o
    This is a bit of a mystery. I regularly freeze mashed potato, and it comes out fine. I make the mash, with whatever additions may be to hand (milk, butter/spread, cheese, etc), and then let it cool before hand-forming into handy-sized balls. I then pop the balls into the freezer on grease-proof paper, before bagging up when the potato is frozen. I've never had any come out watery.
    I have no signature.

    • MrsCrafty
    • By MrsCrafty 9th Oct 11, 12:49 AM
    • 1,881 Posts
    • 3,526 Thanks
    MrsCrafty
    I regularly freeze mash. I boil, drain, leave for about 10 minutes then mash with butter & milk then Leave Uncovered so that all of the steam comes off and doesn't go back into the potato. Then I make patties with both hands, freeze on a baking tray and transfer to bags once frozen. I think the thing is to make sure the potoes get to cool down without being covered.
  • renegade
    Freezing mash.
    So, it would seem that 'open freezing' before storing is the answer ,I will try this method as I too always have lots of mash left over.
    You live..You learn.
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 9th Oct 11, 4:45 AM
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    squeaky
    I find that you need to heat and stir it back in and it dries out a bit as you go, I use the microwave and stir every couple of mins.
    Originally posted by babyshoes
    I do the same. Works for me.

    If the mash seems a bit soft and damp after it is defrosted I heat it uncovered so that the steam can escape, which helps dry it out - though to be honest this is seldom a problem.
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    • pelirocco
    • By pelirocco 9th Oct 11, 9:29 AM
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    pelirocco
    I never have problems with freezing mash , I never use milk in my mash , so maybe thats why ?
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    • meritaten
    • By meritaten 9th Oct 11, 7:11 PM
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    meritaten
    I dont have problems freezing mash either - I just make the mash the usual way with butter (real) and milk (semi skimmed), and its always survived the freezer and microwave just fine!
    could it be that perhaps using tub marge (the 'oh dear it isnt butter') or ('hey, I'm healthy I haven't been near a cow' one) is the prob?
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