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    • keatergreyhound
    • By keatergreyhound 12th Apr 05, 6:07 PM
    • 485Posts
    • 131Thanks
    keatergreyhound
    Slow cooker desserts esp rice pudd
    • #1
    • 12th Apr 05, 6:07 PM
    Slow cooker desserts esp rice pudd 12th Apr 05 at 6:07 PM
    Can anyone please advise me of any slow cooker derserts that I can make especially rice pudding. I would also need to know what type of rice to use please?
    Also can you make the fruit part of a apple crumble in a slow cooker?
    Thanks in advance.
Page 1
    • keatergreyhound
    • By keatergreyhound 12th Apr 05, 6:28 PM
    • 485 Posts
    • 131 Thanks
    keatergreyhound
    • #2
    • 12th Apr 05, 6:28 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Apr 05, 6:28 PM
    sorry
    Ive just worked out how to search the site. Ive found out that I can do both so now im asking for amounts how long and how please.
    Sorry my mum never cooker. I lived on microwave meals and I dont want that for my daughter so im learning now
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 12th Apr 05, 6:31 PM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    • #3
    • 12th Apr 05, 6:31 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Apr 05, 6:31 PM
    Can anyone please advise me of any slow cooker derserts that I can make especially rice pudding. I would also need to know what type of rice to use please?
    by keatergreyhound
    Ingredients
    50g / 2oz pudding rice
    600ml / 1 pint milk
    25g / 1oz sugar

    1) Lightly butter the cook pot
    2) Place all ingredients in the pot and stir
    3) Cook on low for 2.5 to 3.5 hours.

    Pudding rice is definitely best.

    A good site for recipes, recently posted elsewhere, is:

    http://southernfood.about.com/library/crock/blcpidx.htm
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    • Trow
    • By Trow 12th Apr 05, 6:35 PM
    • 2,263 Posts
    • 2,597 Thanks
    Trow
    • #4
    • 12th Apr 05, 6:35 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Apr 05, 6:35 PM
    sorry
    Ive just worked out how to search the site. Ive found out that I can do both so now im asking for amounts how long and how please.
    Sorry my mum never cooker. I lived on microwave meals and I dont want that for my daughter so im learning now
    by keatergreyhound
    Good on you! Cooking is as straightforward or as complicated as you want it to be, and there is nothing to stop anyone cooking decent healthy meals on a regular basis.

    As for what kind of rice - 'pudding' rice is, afaik, the same as short grain rice.

    Good luck!
    • tiff
    • By tiff 12th Apr 05, 7:55 PM
    • 6,551 Posts
    • 8,597 Thanks
    tiff
    • #5
    • 12th Apr 05, 7:55 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Apr 05, 7:55 PM
    I havent tried this yet, but I have it saved for when I get the chance.

    Peach Cobbler

    Ingredients:
    2 lbs fresh or canned peaches, sliced
    2/3 cups oats
    2/3 cup flour
    2/3 cups light brown sugar
    1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
    1/4 tsp nutmeg
    3/4 cup softened butter

    Directions:
    Place the peaches in the stoneware. Combine oats, flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg and pour over peaches. Add the butter and stir until crumbly. Cook on Low for 3 hours.
    • moggins
    • By moggins 12th Apr 05, 10:06 PM
    • 5,177 Posts
    • 10,159 Thanks
    moggins
    • #6
    • 12th Apr 05, 10:06 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Apr 05, 10:06 PM
    Sorry my mum never cooker. I lived on microwave meals and I dont want that for my daughter so im learning now
    by keatergreyhound
    Just wanted to say well done for attempting it, my mum was a rubbish cook too and I never learned until I had my first child and was short of money. Don't ever get discouraged and if you want any advice just ask, there's always someone here who will help a 'learner'
    Organised people are just too lazy to look for things

    F U Fund currently at 250
    • tiff
    • By tiff 12th Apr 05, 10:15 PM
    • 6,551 Posts
    • 8,597 Thanks
    tiff
    • #7
    • 12th Apr 05, 10:15 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Apr 05, 10:15 PM
    My Mum cooked proper meals, but relied on gravy granules and some stuff that we wouldnt necessarily want to eat nowadays. She also didnt have a wide range of recipes, just meat and 2 veg or spag bol or curry and that was only when my step dad came to live with us when I was 15 lol

    I am learning, I have always been able to cook spag bol and chilli from scratch and learned how to make roast potatoes from Delia when I was a teenager. I have expanded on that over the years, but in December I decided to push the boat out and cook everything from scratch. I do have cheat days because I had loads of packets and gravy jars in the cupboards which I am slowly working through but I love learning new things. Once you have repeated the same recipe several times you can move on to the next one because you wont forget it.

    Slow cooking is a lot of trial and error to start with, I couldnt understand why the sauces were so runny at first, but then learned to thicken sauces or reduce them on the hob and now have no problems with that.

    Good luck, this is the best place to be if you're learning to cook
    • Pal
    • By Pal 13th Apr 05, 11:28 AM
    • 2,062 Posts
    • 731 Thanks
    Pal
    • #8
    • 13th Apr 05, 11:28 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Apr 05, 11:28 AM
    I have always cooked but mainly out of jars (chicken tonight type stuff). I then got into real cooking about 18 months ago thanks to the arrival of Pal_Junior and a Jamie Oliver book that I borrowed. JO's cooking is well worth a look because it is all simply "a handful of this, fry it for a bit until it looks cooked then add a pinch of that" rather than being an exact list of instructions to follow.

    I then read The River Cottage Meat books which is an excellent guide to how to buy and cook decent pieces of meat. Once you can do the roasts, meatballs, steaks, stews and lasagne everything else in a meal just falls into place.

    "Appetite" by Nigel Slater is a great book. Very simple to follow and a great reminder that sometimes all you need for a lunch is a bit of salad, some bread and a decent piece of cheese.

    Finally, River Cottage Yearbook gives tables of what is seasonal at the moment and how to cook it.

    Mrs Pal now complains that she can't keep me out of the kitchen at weekends!
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