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    • emidee
    • By emidee 8th Mar 11, 12:51 PM
    • 71 Posts
    • 133 Thanks
    emidee
    • #2
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:51 PM
    Petrol Prices
    • #2
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:51 PM
    60p - Cost + VAT, like (most) other goods.

    Outside of London, it can be difficult to live without a car now - and public transport is woefully inadequate.

    Victimising the motorist is simply unfair; higher taxes across the board would be a much fairer alternative.
    Last edited by emidee; 08-03-2011 at 6:40 PM. Reason: Apparently a misplaced 'sweeping statement'!
    • RussWWFC
    • By RussWWFC 8th Mar 11, 12:51 PM
    • 559 Posts
    • 180 Thanks
    RussWWFC
    • #3
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:51 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:51 PM
    I'd set it at around 99p a litre (IE under a pound)

    Savings could be made elsewhere by cutting foreign aid and reducing the amount of people we pay dole money to as well as making it a round 50 a week.
    Wycombe Till I Die
    • tgroom57
    • By tgroom57 8th Mar 11, 12:52 PM
    • 1,375 Posts
    • 13,097 Thanks
    tgroom57
    • #4
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:52 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:52 PM
    imho the biggest and most unfair bit is when the govt set what the tax on petrol will be way into the future.

    How can they foresee what the price will be?
    Their calculations (made when?) were to make x amount from the tax on petrol, but because the price has gone up they have made x plus a whole lot more. Surely there is room to trim this a bit without cutting into their expected core income from this duty?
  • kopicbloodaxe
    • #5
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:56 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:56 PM
    I'd rather set a tax rate than a fixed amount. I think 50% tax on fuel is more than fair, so that would make it 75p per litre on current cost price of 50p per litre.

    I would be more than happy to offset this with a substantial increase in road tax because this can be more easily budgeted for.
    --Simon.
    • davetrousers
    • By davetrousers 8th Mar 11, 12:59 PM
    • 5,639 Posts
    • 4,881 Thanks
    davetrousers
    • #6
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:59 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:59 PM
    In the poll, Why not show the tax percentages next to the figure?
    .....

    • persian_star
    • By persian_star 8th Mar 11, 12:59 PM
    • 84 Posts
    • 68 Thanks
    persian_star
    • #7
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:59 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Mar 11, 12:59 PM
    I really dislike the fact that fuel tax is so high - it seems ludicrous to charge so much tax on any one thing, especially as it's a necessity for many. However, I also understand that in the place we are now, removing too much tax would leave a black hole that would have to be re-couped elsewhere. Therefore, for now, I would say equal the tax to the cost, i.e. 50p each to make a standard cost of 1 per litre, which is a huge improvement on 1.30, but still pays a not inconsiderable amount of tax. In the future I would bring it down to VAT as emidee said. Why should petrol be so unfairly penalised? It should be taxed at a similar rate to everything else.

  • pinkclouds
    • #8
    • 8th Mar 11, 1:06 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Mar 11, 1:06 PM
    I opted for 1 but I too would have preferred 99p. I don't think dropping the fuel tax by a few pence would make much financial difference to my life but it would make me feel better.

    The tax on tobacco and alcohol is jolly high these days but they *are* luxury products. Perhaps a nice fat tax on chocolate (another luxury product) could offset the lower fuel tax? Obesity is allegedly the main cause of death these days so it would be a public health service too (by "encouraging" lower consumption of sugary, calorie-laden chocolate but actually expecting the same level of consumption and thus a huge amount of bonus tax revenue).
    • WestonDave
    • By WestonDave 8th Mar 11, 1:08 PM
    • 5,038 Posts
    • 8,521 Thanks
    WestonDave
    • #9
    • 8th Mar 11, 1:08 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Mar 11, 1:08 PM
    In March 2010 when the last budget set duty rates petrol was approximately 116p per litre and on that basis the government would be expecting to get 58.95p per litre in fuel duty and 19p VAT. Total tax take per litre would have been about 78p.

    With petrol now at 130p per litre (due to oil price speculation) the government is getting nearly 22p per litre in VAT and the same in fuel duty - therefore the government could afford to cut fuel duty by 2p per litre and still be getting the same tax per litre as it was expecting when it set the budget in March. This is before you consider the extra corporation tax it can expect from oil extraction companies due to the artificially high price of crude oil.

    On that basis petrol duty could be cut without needing to raise other taxes - OK so 2p per litre isn't going to make a massive difference but its a decent start compared to continual rises!
    • robbies_gal
    • By robbies_gal 8th Mar 11, 1:08 PM
    • 7,678 Posts
    • 152,097 Thanks
    robbies_gal
    i voted for 70p i think im wishful thinking i wouldnt mind paying up to but no more than a pound
    What goes around-comes around
    • split second
    • By split second 8th Mar 11, 1:10 PM
    • 2,694 Posts
    • 4,157 Thanks
    split second
    should be tax free.
    Who remembers when X Factor was just Roman suncream?
    • WestonDave
    • By WestonDave 8th Mar 11, 1:11 PM
    • 5,038 Posts
    • 8,521 Thanks
    WestonDave
    In terms of preferences I would like to see them equalise the duty on aircraft fuel with the duty rates on road transport fuel. For many people in rural communities, use of a car is an essential - whereas air travel is a luxury. Few people need to travel for business in the current IT age, and those that do are paid for by their employers. Aviation fuel tax is 20p per litre cheaper than car petrol! Depending on the quantities used it would probably be something like a 5p per litre cut in petrol duty and a 15p per litre rise in aviation fuel duty to get them to the same rate whilst maintaining the tax take.
  • lucylucky
    60p - Cost + VAT, like (most) other goods.

    Outside of London, it is difficult to live without a car now - and public transport is woefully inadequate.

    Victimising the motorist is simply unfair; higher taxes across the board would be a much fairer alternative.
    Originally posted by emidee
    Really?

    Where is this "outside of London" place?
    • grimsalve
    • By grimsalve 8th Mar 11, 1:20 PM
    • 499 Posts
    • 322 Thanks
    grimsalve
    I would be happy with 2 a litre if the extra revenue generated would actually make a difference or was somehow used to benefit the people who have to pay it. Eg. Maybe get rid of roadtax? Improve the roads? etc.

    Unfortunately, I think the price will continue to creep up ... and we'll never see any positive results from the increases.
    • Pmarmalade
    • By Pmarmalade 8th Mar 11, 1:26 PM
    • 169 Posts
    • 137 Thanks
    Pmarmalade
    Slightly OT, but I'd like to see car tax abolished completely and recouped through petrol instead. If you have an inefficient car and do lots of miles you'll be punished much more than an efficient car doing the same mileage through petrol costs, anyway. However if you have an inefficient car and do 1k/yr per year you still have a flat rate to pay even though you are putting out much less emissions than someone in a "cleaner" car doing. 30k/yr.
    • Zyyb
    • By Zyyb 8th Mar 11, 1:34 PM
    • 103 Posts
    • 676 Thanks
    Zyyb
    The green agenda makes me angry. Higher taxation doesn't stop people from driving, people still have to get to jobs. It's an unprogressive tax hurting the poor more.

    And where does the money go?! The bus costs a fortune around Norwich, it's 2.20 for a single to the city. If there were 3 of us, we could get a taxi cheaper!

    I agree with the % idea, make it a 50% tax on the price of petrol and put every single penny into transport, dualling carriageways, bus lanes, hi-speed rail links etc
    The Number One Reason for the Success of the Internet

    Debt at highest - 23,240 - Debt as of May 15 - 2300 0% CC DFD - Mid 2016! Bloody wedding to save up for now!
    • bbqforce10
    • By bbqforce10 8th Mar 11, 1:35 PM
    • 14 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    bbqforce10
    Stop penalising rural areas
    I say it should be 1.

    The railways and many bus companies receive massive public subsidy (i.e. money from me and you as tax payers), and as someone who lives in rural Devon I receive no benefit from this as I have no option but to drive. There are no rail or bus services near me - driving is my only option.

    So why should I subsidise public transport for those who live in cities, and pay even more tax every time I fill up my car?

    The current situation is grossly unfair. Motorists should stop having to pay such high taxes on fuel.

    What really needs to happen is for motorists in rural peripheral areas (like Devon and Cornwall) to pay less duty than those in cities (but this would be complex to implement).

    Also, the government needs to stop this ridiculous proposal for the High Speed Rail link between London and Brimingham (HS2). It makes no economic sense and we cannot afford it. Instead they should focus on a minimum broadband speed to every house in the UK (such as 2mb) - this would do far more for the economy.

    rant over.
    • emidee
    • By emidee 8th Mar 11, 1:59 PM
    • 71 Posts
    • 133 Thanks
    emidee
    Really?

    Where is this "outside of London" place?
    Originally posted by lucylucky
    Specifically.....outer Bristol. (I can only comment directly on my own experience).

    My daughter is only in school for approximately 6 hours per day, no other childcare is available before / after this.

    I would find it impossible to travel to university & back, & still be home in time to collect her at the end of the school day without my car. Buses only run once per hour, and the journey would take an hour each way - a total of 3 hours travelling per day (given the wait for a bus too). Not to mention that I'd miss most lectures that way!

    If I had the luxury of being a stay at home Mum, or didn't want to better myself then I suppose a car wouldn't be necessary!
  • annieredhead
    I think I have the solution...take 50p off the price of 1 litre of petrol and add 50p to a litre of spirits. Alcohol is not essential, it's a luxury. Petrol on the other hand IS essential to most people. Without my car I would be lost as I have chronic arthritis
  • lucylucky
    Specifically.....outer Bristol. (I can only comment directly on my own experience).

    My daughter is only in school for approximately 6 hours per day, no other childcare is available before / after this.

    I would find it impossible to travel to university & back, & still be home in time to collect her at the end of the school day without my car. Buses only run once per hour, and the journey would take an hour each way - a total of 3 hours travelling per day (given the wait for a bus too). Not to mention that I'd miss most lectures that way!

    If I had the luxury of being a stay at home Mum, or didn't want to better myself then I suppose a car wouldn't be necessary!
    Originally posted by emidee
    Thanks

    Would have been better to put "Outer Bristol" rather than make out that the entire population outside of London cannot do without a car.
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