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    • 16011996
    • By 16011996 5th Apr 05, 12:23 PM
    • 8,140 Posts
    • 3,704 Thanks
    16011996
    • #2
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:23 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:23 PM
    i'd just peel veg, chuck in a pan, and boil, simmer for an hour or so, add herbs etc to taste, and whizz in blender.
    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 5th Apr 05, 12:29 PM
    • 3,972 Posts
    • 7,504 Thanks
    culpepper
    • #3
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:29 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:29 PM
    you can rescue a soup with gravy granules if it seems a bit thin or bland or float little 1cm squares of toast on top when serving to make it look pretty.
  • Galtizz
    • #4
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:31 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:31 PM
    What 160 says (Hi 160 ) and, to make it cream of potato and parsnip soup add a slug of milk (or cream if you're feeling flush) when you blend it, then pop it back in the pan for a bit to heat it all through.

    I'd also chop the onion and garlic up and add to the pan first with a little bit of butter and the lid on to soften it (don't let it brown) , then add the chopped pots and parsnips and some water.
    When life hands you a lemon, make sure you ask for tequilla and salt
  • bluesnice
    • #5
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:46 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:46 PM
    well, that seems easy enough!! thanks guys i'll give it a go and let you know how I get on!
  • filigree
    • #6
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:56 PM
    • #6
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:56 PM
    If they're dried beans you won't be able to use them today, but you could cook up some lentils to add to the veg soup to give it more protein.

    I use a recipe guide for soup that goes like this:

    1 cup of diced potato
    1 cup of diced onion
    3 cups of other diced veg (you can include cooked pulses)
    4 cups of stock

    You don't need to buy measuring cups, half a pint is roughly a cup, or just use a large mug.

    You fry up the diced veg and garlic to soften them, then pour on the liquid and simmer for an hour. Liquidise and reheat. At this stage you could add some cooked lentils. If the soup is too thick put some milk in.

    If you're willing to add something else, bacon and parsnip soup is lovely. Just throw some chopped raw bacon in the pan when you fry off the veg.
  • Addy
    • #7
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:57 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Apr 05, 12:57 PM
    My OH is a chef by trade, and is very keen on chucking all manner of leftovers in a pan, adding stock, boiling it up, liquidising it and calling it Soup du Jour
    • tiff
    • By tiff 5th Apr 05, 6:51 PM
    • 6,551 Posts
    • 8,597 Thanks
    tiff
    • #8
    • 5th Apr 05, 6:51 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Apr 05, 6:51 PM
    Thats what I do Addy, always works and you can add more seasoning at the end if necessary but usually I dont need to bother.
    A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went. - Dave Ramsey
  • bluesnice
    • #9
    • 10th Apr 05, 12:01 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Apr 05, 12:01 PM
    thanks for the above advice.. my soup was lovely and was so easy to make! I'll be making soup again with my leftovers.
  • Queenie
    Instead of gravy grans to thicken use a bit of cornflour and water (mix it into a little paste ie: 2 tsps cornflour: you can always make up more if it doesn't thicken it sufficiently) ... gravy granules are high in salt and will inpart their own flavour to your soups. The cornflour mix won't taint the flavour (and is cheaper )
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    • tiff
    • By tiff 10th Apr 05, 2:15 PM
    • 6,551 Posts
    • 8,597 Thanks
    tiff
    Queenie, what is the difference between cornflour and ordinary plain flour? I use plain flour to thicken things.
    • Curry Queen
    • By Curry Queen 10th Apr 05, 2:31 PM
    • 5,482 Posts
    • 3,081 Thanks
    Curry Queen
    I'm just sitting down to scoff a bowl of soup I made today, using chicken stock and bit's of left-over chicken from a carcass we had earlier in the week, and added a leek, a few spuds and bit of swede sitting in the fridge. The only seasoning I added was salt & pepper and instead of cornflour I used my stick blender to puree some of it to thicken but leaving some chunky bits too. Potato is an excellent thickening agent because it's high in starch

    BTW, it's yummy ... and I'm off to get seconds
    "An Ye Harm None, Do What Ye Will"
    ~
    It is that what you do, good or bad,
    will come back to you three times as strong!

  • Queenie
    Queenie, what is the difference between cornflour and ordinary plain flour? I use plain flour to thicken things.
    by tiff
    Good question!

    Cornflour: this is a purified, fine, powdery starch made from maize. It contains *no* gluten or wheat. Cornflower is primarily a thickening agent but some recipes do ask for a measure of cornflour *and* plain/SR flour. In the US cornflour is referred to as cornstarch (far more accurate, don't you think?)
    It is flavourless.

    Flour: (plain/SF/Strong) Comes from grain and contains gluten (gluten is the substance which acts like a chewing gum to "stick" things together). That is why in recipes such as bread and Yorkshire pud you have to allow time for it to "rest" so that the gluten in the flour can relax.

    When you mix flour and water it will thicken immediately (anyone remember flour and water glue?) However, if you mix cornflour and water, all you will get is a thin white looking water! Until you add it to your cooking and heat it, then it will react with the heat and thicken up.

    Obviously you can use flour and water to thicken soups, stews, casseroles. But the gluten in the flour needs "cooking" (ie when you make a roux) whereas cornflour is tasteless and doesn't require cooking as such, merely heating!

    Does that make sense?
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