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  • FIRST POST
    • kittie
    • By kittie 21st Oct 10, 9:23 PM
    • 12,444Posts
    • 79,059Thanks
    kittie
    It may be tough for 6 years. The survival thread
    • #1
    • 21st Oct 10, 9:23 PM
    It may be tough for 6 years. The survival thread 21st Oct 10 at 9:23 PM
    I think it is time for me to start a new thread. We all know that it may take at least 6 years for this country to get back on its feet. We need to survive and we need to share survival strategies.

    can we pull together and help each other?

    Yes of course we can but please can I ask that the thread stays uncluttered so that newbies can source help and ideas quickly
Page 93
    • grandma247
    • By grandma247 13th Jan 11, 10:41 PM
    • 2,391 Posts
    • 33,223 Thanks
    grandma247
    I have found a how to and charts for sprouting so I hope it will be helpful to some. here.
    Did you know you can sprout wheat? Wheat as in whole grains will keep forever if kept in an airtight container and in the dark and coolish. I buy bags of it in the asian supermarket because I like it for breakfast sometimes and have a lovely recipe somewhere on the computer for a cinnamon almond and sultana concoction (can't remember its name offhand)

    On the subject of bread machines. one way to look at it is not just can I make a loaf for less than 9p but I can make a luxury/fancy loaf for a fraction of the shop price.
    Last edited by grandma247; 13-01-2011 at 10:48 PM.
    • Softstuff
    • By Softstuff 13th Jan 11, 11:40 PM
    • 3,059 Posts
    • 35,457 Thanks
    Softstuff
    Do you have any info on towns like Kingaroy? My friend says (this morning) they are still cut off and feel that they have been forgotten. I have never been there but believe it is in a mountainous area and that landslides have made the situation worse. The roads have gone! They really need a food drop by air but the helicopters are (quite rightly) busy on rescue missions! Just don't know what can be done!
    Originally posted by catznine
    They definitely haven't been forgotten, the last I heard on the news is that the army is going to head that way with supplies. I think a lot of areas like that will be feeling forgotten though, there's just so many rural areas cut off and only so many helicopters. I read this about the supermarkets:

    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/weather/supermarkets-enlist-big-guns-to-get-food-to-stores-20110113-19pwj.html

    So there's a huge effort being co-ordinated to resupply as soon as they can. Needless to say there'll be some food, but not much in the way of choice. For curiousities sake as much as anything I visited another supermarket today, they had bananas.... in the whole of the fruit and veg section, that was it. There's plenty of food around here though in general (frozen, tinned and such), so I hope that we're not a priority for supply. I do wonder when we'll be restocked though, and what our choices will be when we are. If tomatos are heading up to $21 a kilo (about 13 pounds) as they predicted on the news, they'll be off my menu. Food here has been pretty expensive by comparison to the UK now for some time, this could make it shocking.
    Softstuff- Officially better than 007
  • ceridwen
    I've been looking at all the foraging stuff, thanks Ceridwen and RAS. A lot of the stuff to forage in Australia (well, in my part of it) is pretty low-cal, low interest. I wish I knew more about mushrooms, but that isn't something I dare try out with book-knowledge, if you know what I mean. There are a few things to grab out there, but it's nothing compared to the joys of England hedgerows! I think I'd have to be a fair bit more desperate yet to try some of it too!

    Sprouting I haven't tried, since I don't have a nice sunny windowsill, which I thought was a prerequisite, but I might give it a go now.

    Guerilla gardening is probably not a great idea exactly where I am. Most of the things I'd plant to eat are non-natives, and they're big in this area about only having native plants in the council maintained areas. A lot of other plants are considered pests, damaging to the Australian flora and fauna. I've tried some of the more Australian things, like bush tomatos and so forth. Let's just say it's a novel meal for a tourist, but a very acquired taste!
    Originally posted by Softstuff
    I've never found a nice sunny windowsill to be necessary for sprouting - which is just as well, as I dont have one

    Of course - I see where you are coming from and you cant guerilla garden anything not native to Australia. 'Tis true that we can go ahead and scatter cabbage, lettuce, etc seeds around here in Britain - because these things are native to Britain...but presumably not native to Australia. Thinks...."remember Japanese knotweed ceridwen" - as that isnt native to us and has become a big problem here (not that I've ever found any yet - I keep hoping - but NIMBY obviously).

    Oh you so know you're middle-aged when you know from personal experience exactly what NIMBY means (ie Not in my Backyard)

    Now if you could import some mushroom spore just for growing "on your own territory" Softstuff..... Its possible I gather to grow mushrooms on dampened old paperback books (now theres a use for telephone directories one might only chuck out anyway...). Yep - i'm planning on having a go myself at some point - assuming I get ignored yet again () on my instructions to Yellow Pages/etc NOT to leave phone directories for me...
    • catznine
    • By catznine 14th Jan 11, 7:44 AM
    • 3,187 Posts
    • 24,544 Thanks
    catznine
    They definitely haven't been forgotten, the last I heard on the news is that the army is going to head that way with supplies. I think a lot of areas like that will be feeling forgotten though, there's just so many rural areas cut off and only so many helicopters. I read this about the supermarkets:

    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/weather/supermarkets-enlist-big-guns-to-get-food-to-stores-20110113-19pwj.html

    So there's a huge effort being co-ordinated to resupply as soon as they can. Needless to say there'll be some food, but not much in the way of choice. For curiousities sake as much as anything I visited another supermarket today, they had bananas.... in the whole of the fruit and veg section, that was it. There's plenty of food around here though in general (frozen, tinned and such), so I hope that we're not a priority for supply. I do wonder when we'll be restocked though, and what our choices will be when we are. If tomatos are heading up to $21 a kilo (about 13 pounds) as they predicted on the news, they'll be off my menu. Food here has been pretty expensive by comparison to the UK now for some time, this could make it shocking.
    Originally posted by Softstuff
    Thanks for that Softstuff! My friend has just posted this on her fb page -Kingaroy open! Food and fuel now getting in! I am so relieved and very thankful to all who prayed and sent positive thoughts I hope all the other cut off towns are now getting supplies through.

    Those prices are terrible! I too would be giving up tomatoes!

    You def don't need a sunny place to sprout beans, I put my sprouter(it was a pressie - a large jar with muslin and elastic band work just as well) in a cupboard!

    I heard on tv today that we in Europe will be getting some of this bad weather in February but not as bad for us! Did anyone else hear this? as I didn't catch all of the article.
    Our days are happier when we give people a bit of our heart rather than a piece of our mind.

    Jan grocery challenge 35.77/120
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 14th Jan 11, 8:11 AM
    • 12,552 Posts
    • 241,625 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Keeping documents safe off-homesite
    Frugal I don't live in a flood area either but I always thought that if I did, I would have a waterproof box with the passports, insurance details and family contacts and anthing else inportant like that upstairs in case of flooding. I do keep things like this together just now in a box under the foot of my bed in case of fire - whether I would remember it in my panic or not is another story altogether - but I think keeping flood essentials upstairs is a sensible idea if you live in an area where it could happen.

    I was watching the news today and found myself sobbing uncontrollaby at the pictures and stories from Australia and Brazil, poor, poor souls.
    Originally posted by jackieglasgow
    Hi Frugal and jackieglasgow, I read an American woman's idea (can't remember where) of keeping critical documents in a safe-deposit box well away from her home. She lived in a forested area prone to rampaging wildfires and had twice had to evacuate with only a few minutes' notice although mercifully her home was not burned out. She suggested passports, birth and marriage certificates, vehicle documents etc etc as well as negatives of beloved family photos, a quantity in cash and an inventory of your household goods (hers were on cd along with scanned proofs of purchase) in case of complete loss so you could make your insurance claim more easily. I've also heard of the "bug-out bag" which is an easily-accesible bag containing a change of clothes, toiletry bag, documents, some cash, medications if applicable and family contacts. Maybe a few snacks, too. The idea being to speed an emergency evacuation. Better to be prepared than not and hope you never need to flee an emergency. I'd want a first aid kit and a water bottle in mine, too.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 14th Jan 11, 8:41 AM
    • 8,748 Posts
    • 30,729 Thanks
    Primrose
    Well I've had some good news today - hubby has been offered a promotion. Doesn't mean we can relax though - it's a step-up role, so small payrise but big prospects further down the line.

    .
    Originally posted by Nitha
    Happy for you & your OH. It's always nice when somebody on here gets good news.
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 14th Jan 11, 8:49 AM
    • 8,748 Posts
    • 30,729 Thanks
    Primrose

    Anyway, one of our local voluntary organisations has been looking for help and I rang and spoke to them last week, I've been putting off calling for weeks. I was welcomed with opened arms and I've been given a chance to help in a number of different areas. I can't tell you how beneficial it's been to me, after two years of being told I'm rubbish, I feel valued and appreciated.
    Originally posted by Pitlanepiglet
    Not only do you feel valued and appreciated. You are and I'm not surprised you were welcomed with open arms. All voluntary organisations these days are desperate for more people to come and help them. They all, in their different ways, add value to our communities and when new volunteers come into the fold, often bringing new ideas or their own skills and experience, it can make such a difference. Hope you get a lot of fun from your new involvement as well as the satisfaction of knowing you're doing something worthwhile.
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 14th Jan 11, 8:59 AM
    • 8,748 Posts
    • 30,729 Thanks
    Primrose
    Just to send some kind thoughts to our Australian members. The floods are truly terrible and quite apart from the devastation and loss caused to individual families, they will undoubtedly have a huge impact on the Australian economy where coalfields, wheat & agricultural areas and industries have been damaged or destroyed. We in Europe will soon be sharing your pain in that many of your exported foodstuffs to us will either rocket in price or become unavailable for the foreseeable future, so truly the world is now a global village.

    To my mind it makes it even more senseless that here in Europe we have to battle to fight European fishing regulations where perfectly good fish have to be killed and thrown back into the sea once certain varieties of fish have been caught up to their quota. With a growing world population and increasingly regular climate catastrophies like yours happening causing the loss or destruction of food crops governments really need to get their acts together on these issues.
    • bluebag
    • By bluebag 14th Jan 11, 9:21 AM
    • 2,402 Posts
    • 23,311 Thanks
    bluebag
    As some may remember I left my job a couple of months ago on poor terms (can't say any more!), I've had two years of being told that I'm rubbish and it's knocked my confidence hugely. I never thought that I would ever leave a job without having another to go to yet I have done at a time where there is really no prospect of any work in my profession so that gives an idea of how bad it was!

    Originally posted by Pitlanepiglet
    I truly believe that until as a country we start managing our workforce instead of bullying that we will never prosper.

    Bullying instead of managing is very unproductive as staff consistently underperform.

    It is such a simple concept and yet time and again I see managers on good salaries compeletely unable to manage staff, merely keeping the workforce in fear. It's quite a disgusting waste of human resource, and very depressing for those employed by totally inept managers.
    • Softstuff
    • By Softstuff 14th Jan 11, 9:30 AM
    • 3,059 Posts
    • 35,457 Thanks
    Softstuff

    Of course - I see where you are coming from and you cant guerilla garden anything not native to Australia. 'Tis true that we can go ahead and scatter cabbage, lettuce, etc seeds around here in Britain - because these things are native to Britain...but presumably not native to Australia. Thinks...."remember Japanese knotweed ceridwen" - as that isnt native to us and has become a big problem here (not that I've ever found any yet - I keep hoping - but NIMBY obviously).
    Originally posted by ceridwen
    I have a pot of English spinach, and a pot of a native Australian plant on my balcony that has the nickname "Aussie Spinach", no idea what it is really. The local possum loves to eat the English kind, it must taste like some kind of delicacy to it, and I don't mind sharing as he's a gorgeous little ringtailed fella. The Aussie one seems damned hardy like most of the native plants, and sod all apart from me eats it!

    I tried herbs once, but the scrub turkeys became frenzied with them and dessimated my little pot!

    I might skip the mushroom growing.... I've only just gotten to grips with growing spinach, I'm not the most greenthumbed person, I can even kill rosemary.

    Thanks for that Softstuff! My friend has just posted this on her fb page -Kingaroy open! Food and fuel now getting in! .
    Originally posted by catznine
    That's a relief. Seems like clean up is underway everywhere. If the roads we need are open tomorrow we'll have guests for lunch from Brisbane, they'll need a good feed by then.


    Those prices are terrible! I too would be giving up tomatoes!
    Originally posted by catznine
    Well, it's not happened yet, but that's what the news predicted. Apparently when the cyclone hit the banana crop they went up to about $15 a kilo.

    I'd say to anyone in England, the things to stockpile now are:
    anything containing tomatoes - tinned, puree, pasta sauces, soups anything grain based - flours, wholegrains
    sugar

    I could be wrong, but I think these are easy to stockpile with long lives, and I think they're the most likely staples to go up rapidly now.

    Oh, and tinned pineapple if you like that (we don't), since a heap of those have gone underwater too.
    Softstuff- Officially better than 007
    • MKS
    • By MKS 14th Jan 11, 9:45 AM
    • 10,088 Posts
    • 153,315 Thanks
    MKS
    We visited Australia in November and were astounded by how much food had rocketed in price since our previous visit in 2007. Grapes $18-25 a kg (12-18 approx)!!! My nephew lives in Adelaide and we were shocked at the amount of their shopping bill. His wife is Scottish and very careful on what she spends. My aunt also told me that after the drought a couple of years ago, bananas were about 1 each. I can't imagine what the rises will be after the floods.
  • rosieben
    I have found a how to and charts for sprouting so I hope it will be helpful to some.
    ...
    Originally posted by grandma247
    This is really useful, thank you. I'll put a link on the Grocery Challenge recipe list
    Last edited by rosieben; 14-01-2011 at 9:51 AM.
    ... don't throw the string away. You always need string!

    C.R.A.P.R.O.L.L.Z Head Sharpener
  • jackieglasgow
    Softstuff what's a scrub turkey?
    It's what is inside your head that matters in life - not what's outside your window
    Originally posted by mardatha
    Every worthwhile accomplishment, big or little, has its stages of drudgery and triumph; a beginning, a struggle and a victory. - Ghandi
    • Charis
    • By Charis 14th Jan 11, 9:58 AM
    • 1,293 Posts
    • 13,610 Thanks
    Charis
    I analysed the risk level of flooding for my house when I bought it - counts as very very low risk indeed (negligible).
    Originally posted by ceridwen
    I wonder how many Toowoombans thought the same, since their town is 2,300 feet above sea level?

    In the 2007 floods in the West Midlands, our town was cut off at one point, like an island in a sea of mud. People over in Gloucester, even in the suburbs of the city, had no drinking water for days - I seem to recall it was two weeks - because the pumping station had flooded, and the rest of the area only narrowly escaped the same fate as they managed to sandbag our pumping station. Even when they sent water bowsers to areas some of them were vandalised.

    There seems to be an inexcusable ignorance on the part of governments, even in our civilised countries, as to the positioning of vital facilities and institutions and the likelihood of them becoming unusable/inaccessible in the event of a natural disaster. And they still allow the building of homes on flood plains and along river banks Much money has been wasted publicising the 'Five a Day' campaign but none has been spent advising the average person what they must keep in their emergency supplies.

    Another thing that concerns me is that when radios go digital, wind up radios will be obsolete and there will be no way for anyone to communicate with the people if the power supply goes down, which often happens anyway out in the sticks. Maybe we should send an MSE petition to point out the obvious to those empowered to do something about these holes in the fabric of our society. This is true Old Style, except the war this time is a war on waste of resources.

    Meanwhile grants are being given to scientists to fritter away on the absurd. I read the other day that some scientist has at last managed to discover what ammonites used to have for breakfast.
  • jackieglasgow
    Brilliant post Charis - good points, well made!
    It's what is inside your head that matters in life - not what's outside your window
    Originally posted by mardatha
    Every worthwhile accomplishment, big or little, has its stages of drudgery and triumph; a beginning, a struggle and a victory. - Ghandi
    • Charis
    • By Charis 14th Jan 11, 10:12 AM
    • 1,293 Posts
    • 13,610 Thanks
    Charis

    Sooo...the point of the post is those that don't have work, do really think about volunteering, I know it's difficult to make the first move when you're feeling down in the dumps and unappreciated but there are so many voluntary organisations who would be only too pleased to have your help.

    Chin up all and stay strong x
    Originally posted by Pitlanepiglet
    Well done Piglet! What you say is very true, it can be hard to go into a voluntary job, not knowing what to expect, even more so for those who've been out of the work force for a long time. However the rewards in terms of confidence building are immeasurable. I used to work at the local Volunteer Centre and have seen the change in some of the volunteers I have placed. It also puts you in a good position to hear of permanent work if any becomes available. I know a couple of volunteers became p/t deputy managers at local charity shops.

    Anyone wanting to see what's out there locally can have a look on the Do It website at the list of current vacancies. Not all are advertised, we used to have a few where the organisation preferred us to refer people. If you want to find your nearest Volunteer Centre there's a link on the same site.
    • Softstuff
    • By Softstuff 14th Jan 11, 11:32 AM
    • 3,059 Posts
    • 35,457 Thanks
    Softstuff
    There seems to be an inexcusable ignorance on the part of governments, even in our civilised countries, as to the positioning of vital facilities and institutions and the likelihood of them becoming unusable/inaccessible in the event of a natural disaster. And they still allow the building of homes on flood plains and along river banks Much money has been wasted publicising the 'Five a Day' campaign but none has been spent advising the average person what they must keep in their emergency supplies.
    Originally posted by Charis
    Over here they do spend rather a lot on advising citizens about what to do in the event of each disaster (on TV, in the press, with preparedness website), and to be frank, I don't think there's any way they could have avoided building on 3/4 of the state - that's the total area affected. Over here you build where water is - otherwise you don't have it for growing or anything else, other than that it's a desert. I'd have to stick up for the Aussie government here, they're doing a hell of a lot better than I expected they could under the circumstances, though I guess that's a lot to do with the willingness of the average person to get stuck in.
    Softstuff what's a scrub turkey?
    Originally posted by jackieglasgow
    They're the wild turkeys that are plentiful around here (if you google image search bush turkey you'll find them). At the moment there's a ton of little babies around, and they're soooo cute!
    Softstuff- Officially better than 007
    • RAS
    • By RAS 14th Jan 11, 11:39 AM
    • 27,996 Posts
    • 48,414 Thanks
    RAS
    I used to live in one of the most frequently flooded cities in England; my walk home doubled several times each winter when the river rose. One year we had floods as bad as any known historically (500 years). People at the end of the street could not access their front doors, but the water was still 1.5 metres below the houses. What struck me living there was that the city generally flooded in areas where there was no older housing/commercial property. It was only when people started trying to protect newer properties that some of the areas that had been very close to flood limits in previous years became vunerable.

    That year the new City Chief slept under his desk for 10 days. The water crept to within a centrimetre of the top of the sandbags desparately raising the protection around one area at risk, and another area succumbed to flooding for the first time; despite having been OK in every flood over the past 100 years or so.

    That city has begun to understand the need to manage the floodwaters better and to build defensively but we are left with a legacy of poor decisions across the nation. Where are almost all our sewage works? Where are our pumping stations and electricity sub-stations? Think of the supermarkets and commercial centres built on floodplains across the land and the riverside appartments, even those with garages only at ground floor level.

    What hit Toowoomba, Grantham and the other small communities down the Lockyer Valley could not have been predicted. 15cms, near enough 6 inches, of rain landing in around one hour. If that had fallen the other side of the Toowoomba range, a few miles away, the story would be different. The flash flood at Boscastle was caused by 2 inches of rainfall in a longer time period. Some of those who survived in the Lockyer flash flood had 4-7 minutes warning, other almost none. Ten years of drought does not prepare you mentally for dealing with a flash flood.

    From what I have seen local housing is mainly single storey timber built with cladding and tin roofs. In Katrina, tin roofs turned houses into coffins when the water rose too far in the Nineth. In the Lockyer, some people got out on the roof but the house washed away.

    When the last car was pulled out of the harbour at Boscastle, and no bodies found, there was a sigh of relief. Despite this some folk had very narrow escapes. I think it was the publican who had the wit to shove all his customers upstairs when he saw water rushing past the rear ground floor windows. Which is OK if you have a three storey stone built property, not so easy in Queensland. had he not done so, they would have been swimming for their lives when the window blew in.

    Charis, I had not realised that wind up radios would be useless when digital radio comes in. Why oh why do we insist on rendering what works obsolete.
    The person who has not made a mistake, has made nothing
    • lauren_1
    • By lauren_1 14th Jan 11, 11:41 AM
    • 1,984 Posts
    • 5,256 Thanks
    lauren_1
    I wonder if the mayans may have been a year out or so with their predictions?

    I live on a flood plain, 15ft from a canal and 300ft from a river that joins to the river severn.

    I am trying to convince OH i want to buy a dinghy.
    • sb44
    • By sb44 14th Jan 11, 11:45 AM
    • 5,182 Posts
    • 12,231 Thanks
    sb44
    Thinks...."remember Japanese knotweed ceridwen" - as that isnt native to us and has become a big problem here (not that I've ever found any yet - I keep hoping - but NIMBY obviously).

    Oh you so know you're middle-aged when you know from personal experience exactly what NIMBY means (ie Not in my Backyard)
    Originally posted by ceridwen
    Funnily enough my 11 year old asked what Nimby meant the other day, you are right about the middle aged bit, I am and had to remember what it meant.

    One of those words that you remember that doesn't come around too often these days, bit like namby pamby!


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