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  • FIRST POST
    • Alison_B
    • By Alison_B 3rd Mar 05, 8:11 AM
    • 2,096Posts
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    Alison_B
    Healthy Eating
    • #1
    • 3rd Mar 05, 8:11 AM
    Healthy Eating 3rd Mar 05 at 8:11 AM
    I hope that you wonderful people will be able to give me some inspiration.

    I have 2 boys and they are both getting overweight, they are both very unruly and I truly believe that this is down to their diet. Since watching Jamies School Dinners programme have decided to prepare more homemade meals, not only for their health but also for the cost. The evening meal is a problem for my youngest as he won't eat pasta, potatoes or rice, nor will he eat "proper" meat - only the reconstituted rubbish and I am at a loss for lunchtimes when they are at school.

    My eldest (13) will try more or less anything but my youngest (10) won't eat anything healthy that I give him. If he had his way he would eat McDonalds and Pizza for every meal.

    I have sent them off to school with a wholemeal pitta bread today with cheese and salad in, a drink of pure fruit juice, an apple and (unfortunately) a bag of crisps but the youngest has already said he won't eat it.

    Can anybody please help me in ideas for packed lunches that will be healthy for them but that they will also eat. I find that drinks are a problem. They will both drink the pure fruit juice and they like cordials but I am trying to cut down on additives. I have tried giving them water for school but they didn't touch it and I had world war 3 when they came home.

    Thanks

    Alison
Page 1
    • Ticklemouse
    • By Ticklemouse 3rd Mar 05, 8:28 AM
    • 4,896 Posts
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    Ticklemouse
    • #2
    • 3rd Mar 05, 8:28 AM
    • #2
    • 3rd Mar 05, 8:28 AM
    Alison, at their ages, you may have problems as they are old enough to exert themselves, but the youngest is perhaps still too young to appreciate why you are trying to change their diets. My eldest is nearly 6 so still at the age where I tell hin what he is having to eat and if he doesn't want it, hard luck. I've recently started boiling my own hams instead of buying pre-sliced ham with all the added stuff and he told me last night he doesn't like it. He only eats ham or jam butties, and I don't make him jam, so guess what he's got today! It has to be said, he eats it and in a couple of days he will be used to it. I don't give mine the option of crisps/choccy biscuits. I don't buy squash for them (hubby like Ribena, but boys don't drink it)

    I suppose there are 2 ways of dealing with this and it will depend on how strong you are, & what your boys are like. You could try introducing things gradually and giving them choice OR you could do the short sharp treatment a la 'You Are What You Eat'. Give them what you want to feed them and they either go hungry or they eat it. This will mean you cannot have in your house, things they will pig out on - crisps, squash/fizzy drinks, biscuits, pies etc etc. If they get hungry, offer them fruit. It's hard, but remember they are in fact addicted to junk food. They will have cravings for sugar, salt etc. the companies have deliberately made their food this way.

    You could also offer some sort of non-food reward eg points/stars for eating well = treat at end of week (ice skating, cinema etc)

    My big thing that I have recommended to lots of people, (who have thanked me when they have seen major improvements) is Hemp Seed Oil tablets. Excellent source of Omega 3, 6 and all those other EFA's needed. They are reasonably cheap, (Holland and Barrett, 3.70 ish for 60 tabs, 1 a day each boy) You will see an improvement in their behaviour after a few weeks (my boy, 2 weeks, friends boy who was worse, 4 weeks) Combine this with reduction in e numbers and you should be laughing. Also try to remember this will be like an uphill battle at the beginning, but as the boys get used to better food, they will eat more of it, their behaviour will improve and it get easier. Good luck.
    • elona
    • By elona 3rd Mar 05, 8:28 AM
    • 11,149 Posts
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    elona
    • #3
    • 3rd Mar 05, 8:28 AM
    • #3
    • 3rd Mar 05, 8:28 AM
    Try cutting chicken into small pieces then dipping in egg and breadcrumbs before baking it so it looks "artificial".

    Make your own sausage by mixing any kind of lean mince with onions and spices then rolling into a sausage shape and baking it.

    How about filled pancakes?

    Do not make a big thing about healthy food try talking about what footballers or sports people eat and that "certain convenience food" would not be seen in their house.
    "This site is addictive!"
    Wooligan 2 squares for smoky - 3 squares for HTA
    Preemie hats - 2.
  • Lillibet
    • #4
    • 3rd Mar 05, 8:51 AM
    • #4
    • 3rd Mar 05, 8:51 AM
    Maybe introducing things over a couple of weeks along side SOME of their regular junk food, so that they become familiar even if they don't eat it straight away, not making a big thing of them chosing not to eat things but eventually not giving them any alternatives & cutting out all food with mono-soduim glutomate (Sp?) in it (added to all fast food & junk food, makes it addictive so that you want more) would result in a turn around in the space of a few weeks .

    I too saw Jamie Oliver last night & was utterly horrifed, seven year olds who had never tasted strawberries & spat them out beacuse they didn't taste like McDonalds strawberry milkshaks!! Packed lunches with 4 choclolate bars but no fruit or dairy? A mother serving food she confessed she would not eat herself & didn't know what it contained? Please tell me this was not typical of our youth but an extreme example???
    Post Natal Depression is the worst part of giving birth

    In England we have Mothering Sunday & Father Christmas, Mothers day & Santa Clause are American merchandising tricks Demonstrate pride in your heirtage by getting it right please people!
  • Galtizz
    • #5
    • 3rd Mar 05, 9:09 AM
    • #5
    • 3rd Mar 05, 9:09 AM
    Try having a look at the BBC fat nation site, there is a section on packed lunches here:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/bigchallenge/changinghabits/lunchboxes.shtml

    There are a lot of recipies on this bit including a 'takeaway' recipe section:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/bigchallenge/changinghabits/

    You can still give them pizza if you make it yourself, so you know what is in/ on it there is a recipe in the link above. You could try making them individual bases then a selection of toppings (only healthy ones), you might find they are more encouraged to eat it if they have 'made' it themselves.

    There is a thread on here somewhere (can't find it at the min.) by someone trying to reduce costs of feeding a big family with 3 growing lads but it suggests things like getting them to drink water before a meal so that it fills them up (and they are eating less)
    It also suggests serving a 2 course meal so you could serve a vegetable based soup as a starter, again it fills them up and it have veg in it. Unfortunatly you'll have to be really strong and say things like, no tea unless you finish your soup. I know it seems harsh but my Mum always told me I couldn't have any pudding until I'd eaten all of my vegetables and it never did me any harm!
    Another tip is to reduce the amount of meat in bolognese, chilli, sausage caserole, cottage pie etc. by adding loads of veg and whizzing it up in a blender so they can't see it.

    Good Luck.
    When life hands you a lemon, make sure you ask for tequilla and salt
  • fazer6
    • #6
    • 3rd Mar 05, 9:20 AM
    • #6
    • 3rd Mar 05, 9:20 AM
    Lillibet I was horified at the 4 choccie biccies too. I couldn't imagine having more than one choccie biccie with my lunch and would never feed a growing child 4 just for lunch.

    I was absolutly horified by last nights tv, anyone notice that everyone had chips for tea and hardly anyone actually had any meat. I never thought I ate healthily, just normal food really, but last night really opened my eyes to what some people do to their children.
    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 3rd Mar 05, 9:40 AM
    • 13,149 Posts
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    Debt_Free_Chick
    • #7
    • 3rd Mar 05, 9:40 AM
    • #7
    • 3rd Mar 05, 9:40 AM
    Two things. I don't think you can use reasoned debate i.e. explain why it's healthy. They'll just ignore it and give you that "whatever" remark.

    I think you can only apply tough love. Keep giving them healthy food. When they get hungry enough, they'll eat it. The problem with packed lunches is that kids swap the stuff they don't want. But chances are, the other kids are eating "rubbish" and will want to keep it to themselves, rather than swapping it for your kids' healthy stuff.

    Just stick to it. Once you give in, they know what to do to get you to give in again.
    • Alison_B
    • By Alison_B 3rd Mar 05, 2:15 PM
    • 2,096 Posts
    • 1,833 Thanks
    Alison_B
    • #8
    • 3rd Mar 05, 2:15 PM
    • #8
    • 3rd Mar 05, 2:15 PM
    Thanks for your replies. I have just been shopping again today and stocked up on healthy foods and things I can make myself. I have bought some bottled sparkling water and some pure fruit juice. I froze the fruit juice and will add a couple of cubes to the water that we can have with our tea tonight. I know that my youngest will moan and I am going to feel terrible if he doesn't eat his tea - I am making spaghetti bolognese and he usually has tinned as he won't eat what I make but I am going to stick to it.

    My husband says I will give in as my son will moan and not eat it, then start crying later on saying he is hungry. It really tugs on my heart strings when he does this but I really need to do something now before it is too late.

    I liked the idea of making sauces out of vegetables so that they didn't realise that was what it was. Cunning.

    The little girl in Jamies programme last night was just like my son (not will all the biscuits though). Showing Jamie what she had and saying her sandwiches were in the rubbish bag.

    Alison
    • Austin Allegro
    • By Austin Allegro 3rd Mar 05, 2:44 PM
    • 1,445 Posts
    • 4,072 Thanks
    Austin Allegro
    • #9
    • 3rd Mar 05, 2:44 PM
    • #9
    • 3rd Mar 05, 2:44 PM
    I don't have kids (probably a good thing) but I'd suggest you use both a carrot and stick approach.

    The 'stick' is basically telling them to like it or lump it. As a child I was forced to eat my dinner whether I liked it or not - my mother basically sat next to me and would not let me leave the table until I had eaten a reasonable amount. Once I spat some food out and was given six of the best for that by my father - I didn't do it again.

    The 'carrot' is to make some concessions to your children's picky habits, ie if they eat their first course they can have some sticky junk for pudding, or you can make their food a little bit more like the junk food they seem addicted to - eg serving roast potatoes, using lots of grated cheese, garlic etc As a child I recall eating at friends' houses whose mothers served junk food and I think it was the seasoning I liked as opposed to the plain food served at home.
  • Lillibet
    As a child I recall eating at friends' houses whose mothers served junk food and I think it was the seasoning I liked as opposed to the plain food served at home.
    by Austin Allegro
    I would agree with this. I still don't like either chops or boiled potatos beacuse they are just so damned BLAND.

    Personally I wouldn't want to turn mealtimes into a battleground, they occour too frequently & are too important as family time to spend them arguing & being frustrated over a serving of peas or whatever. I would advocate serving up what YOU see fit (remember YOU are the PARENT, they are the CHILD & they should not dictate to you) & let them leave what they don't like but don't offer them any extra of anything or any alternatives. If they miss a meal or 2 it really won't hurt them & they'll soon get over it.
    Offering or removing the pudding option is a personal thing. Again personally speaking, if it a healthy fruit salad or yoghurt type pudding, for example, I wouldn't say they couldn't have it beacuse they hadn't eaten their veggies, I'd chose get the nutrition into them if they would eat the fruit salad. However, if it was ice cream I'd certainly use the threat (and the action) of no pudding if they didn't at least make an effort to eat their healthy main course. Just a mouthful or 2 is a start and better than nothing after all, & if it's unfamilar they should be praised for trying it.

    Are they of suitable ages where they might be encouraged to help prepare food & thus get more interested that way?
    Post Natal Depression is the worst part of giving birth

    In England we have Mothering Sunday & Father Christmas, Mothers day & Santa Clause are American merchandising tricks Demonstrate pride in your heirtage by getting it right please people!
  • Bargain-Babe
    I'm a community health nurse and have loads of mums moaning about their children's eating habits, however when you suggest that they cook the same meal for everyone and not give in to the children they moan that the kids wouldn't eat it and basically they do it for an easy life. As a mum myself my children get healthy home cooked meals and if they won't eat it they don't get anything else. They are not allowed puddings unless they make an effort with their veg. It is easier to do it from an early age but I think its worth starting at any age. Remember whose the boss!!!

    My son (6)takes to school sandwiches (wholemeal bread), cherry toms, grapes , yoghurt and orange juice for his lunch and a banana for break. He does moan that other children have crisps for break but. the school have got a healthy eating policy for breaktime so I'm sticking to my guns on this one.

    I was also horrified when watching Jamie Oliver but also not very surprised. We live in an overprocessed nation and I think everyone needs to get back to cooking from scratch. Thats why I love this forum so much!!
  • Quackers
    I knew I'd find a thread talking about how shocked they were by last night Jamie Oliver! We were also gobsmacked!!

    We've talked about it with our girls today and when I told my 10year old that the children didn't recognise ANY vegetables she was really shocked too.

    I have 2 girls Alison - sounds similar to you as my eldest will eat absolutely anything but we do struggle with the youngest. She is 10. Her attitude towards food is gradually changing though. We got her a cookbook! She is cooking her own pizza for tea tonight. She loves the idea of weighing & measuring & mixing and cooking! I have to admit that she thinks the tomato base is a shop bought tomato puree type thing but its not! Its a home made one with added veg that I've whizzed up into a smooth paste - I'll tell her one day

    It is about persistance. Dont give in and they'll eventually see that they have to eat it especially if there is nothing else inside the house. We did great until our girls started school - they ate exactly what we ate and thought a packet of raisins were sweets - until they went and got themselves friends who told them different:rolleyes:

    Youngest doesn't like too many veggies but likes salad so often has a side salad with her meal instead - as long as she's getting veggies somehow I dont mind doing this for her.

    Keep up the good work - you WILL get there and it'll be worth it.

    Ticklemouse - I've been looking in health shops for those hemp seed tablets you've been talking about as I saw it on another thread but I cannot get them. Would you mind telling me what make they are? And do they ttse yukky? Thanks.
    Sometimes it's important to work for that pot of gold...But other times it's essential to take time off and to make sure that your most important decision in the day simply consists of choosing which color to slide down on the rainbow...
    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 3rd Mar 05, 4:15 PM
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    Debt_Free_Chick
    It really tugs on my heart strings when he does this
    He needs your "tough love" so you can't give in. Apart from anything else, it will prove to him that this method of getting you give in works.

    And it seems I'm not the only one here who thinks this
  • Ted_Hutchinson
    ......snip.................
    My big thing that I have recommended to lots of people, (who have thanked me when they have seen major improvements) is Hemp Seed Oil tablets. Excellent source of Omega 3, 6 and all those other EFA's needed. They are reasonably cheap, (Holland and Barrett, 3.70 ish for 60 tabs, 1 a day each boy)........snip..........
    by Ticklemouse
    The website for H&B quotes 3.49 for Hemp Seed Oil 297 mg which typically contains:
    Linoleic Acid (LA) 160-170 mg
    Alpha Linolenic Acid (ALA) 40-50 mg
    Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA) 8-9 mg

    You will see that these provide only about 300mg of EFA's so do not work out such good value as the Hemp oil from ZIPVIT which are A117a Hemp Oil 1000mg - 180 (size H) 11.45

    In the discussion forum there is an Omega thread with details of the Durham trial which demonstrated the effect of EFA's on children, the trial used 500 units of EPA which isn't exactly the same as Hemp oil which contains the precusors to the Omega3/6 as the extent to which the body converts the ingredients of Hemp oil to Omega oils it is reasonable to assume a higher, rather than lower dose of hemp oil should be used to achieve the effective dose used in the Durham trial. Anyone using these oils should be aware that many research papers suggest the maximum effect may take several months to be achieved. It is also worth repeating that where there is an underlying medical condition this should receive proper medical attention.
    • Ticklemouse
    • By Ticklemouse 3rd Mar 05, 4:32 PM
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    Ticklemouse
    Ted - thanks for the ZIPVIT link. Certainly very interesting. My boys are only 2 and 5 and the H&B tablets are small, so easy for them to take. How big is a Size H zipvit tablet? Couldn't find where it told me, but only had a quick look. Maybe I'll get some for me and see.

    As for taste - as long as you don't chew the tablet, they don't really taste of anything. My 2 yo always chews the tablet though! Bet he wouldn't take it if I offered him the oil on a spoon.
    • the_cat
    • By the_cat 3rd Mar 05, 5:37 PM
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    the_cat
    hi, I'm quite new to the site, so hope you dont mind me posting. A trick I have used with my two boys(age 12 and 9) was to sit them down and discuss the food they said they disliked. I agreed that everyone dislikes some foods and told them that they were allowed 10 (set your own limit) items each that I would promise not to make them eat. I then told them that I felt it unreasonable for them to say they disliked more than that amount and that they would have to eat anything not 'on the list' if they were given it. Of course to start with the list got filled up very very quickly with every new item I gave them! After that however there was a change - every food I tried they to start with said they hated, but when asked which food currrently 'on the list' they wished to take off and start eating, they became very broad minded and we soon got to a true list of foods they hated and they now eat pretty much anything and really enjoy trying new foods. It worked for me, so it could be worth a try!!!
    • Ticklemouse
    • By Ticklemouse 3rd Mar 05, 5:41 PM
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    Ticklemouse
    Hi Cat and welcome.

    What a good idea. Certainly something to think about for mine in the future.
  • Ted_Hutchinson
    Ted - thanks for the ZIPVIT link. Certainly very interesting. My boys are only 2 and 5 and the H&B tablets are small, so easy for them to take. How big is a Size H zipvit tablet? Couldn't find where it told me, but only had a quick look. Maybe I'll get some for me and see.
    by Ticklemouse
    As they contain 1000mg they are quite large (probably nearly 3 times the size of a 300mg capules) You could try the dodge used by some who have had trouble getting their children to take the omega fish oil caps. That is snipping the end off the capsule and sprinking it on toast, under the marmalade/jam, or mixing it in the porridge but I've only tried doing this with the Zipvit Omega Juice. I can't comment on what the Hemp oil tastes like if you put it on toast or in porridge but it won't do you any harm to experiment and see if you or your partner can detect it before you foist it on the children.

    Unfortunately canniboids, which others may realise are derived from the Hemp plant, aren't present in these capsules and they are legal, however if you want your teenage children also to use them it might be better not to stress this point.
    • Alison_B
    • By Alison_B 3rd Mar 05, 6:37 PM
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    • 1,833 Thanks
    Alison_B
    Hi, well tonights meal is over with and it was a reasonable success. I decided that instead of us sitting with a tray watching the TV, we would sit at the table and engage in conversation. I distracted my youngest whilst he was eating and he finished everything on his plate - it was only a small plate though but I am really pleased and praised him loads. The only thing they didn't like was the sparkling water with pure fruit juice in. They asked for coke or cordial but I just added more fruit juice to the water and they did eventually drink it. I told them that they were just used to such sweet things full of additives and preservatives that it would take a while to get used to it.

    They wanted dessert so I said they could have a yogurt but that is something I am going to have to look into at a later point as I saw a woman talking on This Morning a couple of weeks ago and she said that a pot of yogurt could contain 7 teaspoons of sugar. I always thought it was healthy.

    Anyway, I have got my feeling good hat on tonight and have ordered the Jamie Oliver cookbook that was advertised on TV last night. I thought it might give me inspiration for other things to give them.

    Boy, do I feel smug tonight now.

    Thanks

    Alison
    • Cheapskate
    • By Cheapskate 3rd Mar 05, 6:47 PM
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    • 20,518 Thanks
    Cheapskate
    I've had a few moans about melas I've served up when someone takes a dislike to peas or mushrooms or whatever, but we too have rule that you eat what's there, make your own or go hungry. I do avoid giving the kids one or two things they really don't like (& they have tried them), but sometimes I chop them up small, or say 'there's only a few, just eat them fast!' I've been watching Jamie Oliver too, & have to agree with him, & you lot, about what we give our kids. We eat fairly sensibly, plenty of veg, etc., but occasionally have fish & chips, pizza or whatever, but only a few times a year. Try homemade pizza with hidden veg, or homemade soup with loads of stuff chucked in - by the time it's well seasoned/has lots of nice cheese on, even fussy kids will eat the lot. My youngest son (13) is getting interested in cooking & loves to take anything homemade for his packup to school. My daugher (16) is a typical fussy teenage girl, but will still eat salad, chicken, homemade casseroles etc. They've often said that school food is rubbish & take a packup - sandwiches, fresh/dried fruit, fruit juice, veg pieces, OK sometimes crisps!, leftover pizza/cornish pasties from last night's tea - the list really is endless! Please have fun with what you give your kids - if they must have a choc biscuit say they can have it as long as they also take some carrot sticks & mini Philadelpia tubs - literally carrot & stick approach!
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