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    • summerday
    • By summerday 12th Jan 10, 3:41 PM
    • 1,312 Posts
    • 2,175 Thanks
    summerday
    • #2
    • 12th Jan 10, 3:41 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Jan 10, 3:41 PM
    Such a simple tip, but after slipping all over pavements in my work shoes and trainers, I started wearing my wellie boots, which have surprisingly good grip on the soles and stop any wetness getting to my feet. They make walking in the ice and snow so much easier and worth the hassle of carrying other shoes to change into at work etc.
    Yesterday is today's memories, tomorrow is today's dreams
  • ChrisCobra
    • #3
    • 12th Jan 10, 3:41 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Jan 10, 3:41 PM
    Take your young ones to school in a sledge if theyre at that age , they do over here.

    Walk in the fresh part of snow , more grip so you dont slip.

    Dont drive out in ice unless its an absolute emergency , it could save your life or serious damage to yourself and others.

    Put the heating on now and then to avoid freezing pipes!
  • mummy_Jay
    • #4
    • 12th Jan 10, 3:50 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Jan 10, 3:50 PM
    Sweep your drive & paths off (when the snow is fresh to make it eaiser) to avoid it turning to ice.

    If you really must drive, go really slowly and don't rev your engine. (can't believe the amont of cars I've seen sliding in the last week cos they're puting the foot down on the accelerator on ice)

    If you must drive anywhere have a blanket and shovel, just incase. Always carry a phone with you, just incase.
  • Evansangel
    • #5
    • 12th Jan 10, 4:50 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Jan 10, 4:50 PM
    All the snow has turned to ice in Portsmouth, some people have been shoveling it away on the street outside their house, but others haven't.

    Maybe offer to shovel theirs or maybe lend them your shovel?

    Not everyone has one, and its a big help for when you need to walk down side roads
    Wife, Mum, Fashion Student, Morrisons Worker
    2012: Clear CC, Clear Catalogue, Start Saving!
    • Glitzkiss
    • By Glitzkiss 12th Jan 10, 5:21 PM
    • 5,184 Posts
    • 13,471 Thanks
    Glitzkiss
    • #6
    • 12th Jan 10, 5:21 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Jan 10, 5:21 PM
    If you are cold wear lots of thin layers instead of one thick layer of clothing. The thin layers trap and contain your body heat better.

    Carry some old mats/carpets in your car. If you get stuck in the snow stick them under the wheels that the engine provides the power to and they'll create a more suitable surface to get you moving.

    Don't try driving a rear-wheel drive car in the snow
    Skip to the end
  • daisy1973
    • #7
    • 12th Jan 10, 5:39 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Jan 10, 5:39 PM

    Don't try driving a rear-wheel drive car in the snow
    Originally posted by Glitzkiss
    If you do drive a rear-wheel car make sure you have got plenty of weight at the back,helps even things out abit.
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    • MrsTinks
    • By MrsTinks 12th Jan 10, 6:32 PM
    • 14,994 Posts
    • 23,044 Thanks
    MrsTinks
    • #8
    • 12th Jan 10, 6:32 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Jan 10, 6:32 PM
    Candles - have a stock of tealights about in case of powercuts and also light a few in the evening - they actually give off a surprising amount of heat - especially if you close the doors to the livingroom Buy a large bag from IKEA
    DFW Nerd #025
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  • Noggin the Nog
    • #9
    • 12th Jan 10, 6:44 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Jan 10, 6:44 PM
    I've been stuck in my house for the last week because of the snow but as a result haven't spent anything! Because the supermarket delivery van hasn't been able to reach me I've had to eat my way through all the stuff in the freezer and the cupboards I'd probably never have got round to thereby saving even more.

    I'm therefore donating some money to the charities I support from my savings this week - if your week has been like mine, why not do the same for your favourite charities?
    • choille
    • By choille 12th Jan 10, 6:53 PM
    • 5,531 Posts
    • 28,315 Thanks
    choille
    Wear old socks over your shoes/wellies - really gives grip on the ice.

    Make sure you feed the birds & keep them supplied with fresh/unfrozen water.

    Check on elderly neighbours - see if they need anything.

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    Last edited by MSE Deborah; 19-01-2010 at 7:48 PM.
  • ceridwen
    All the snow has turned to ice in Portsmouth, some people have been shoveling it away on the street outside their house, but others haven't.

    Maybe offer to shovel theirs or maybe lend them your shovel?

    Not everyone has one, and its a big help for when you need to walk down side roads
    Originally posted by Evansangel
    The thought of lending a shovel is a good one.

    I've been wondering at intervals whether to use a shovel to remove ice on "my" bit of pavement - but instantly stymied each time I think of it because I dont actually HAVE a shovel. Wouldnt find the use for one enough to warrant buying one - and wouldnt have the space to keep one anyway in my tiny little house. So - I've ended up each time I think about it just hoping that someone else nearby has one and is publicspirited enough to do a few other peoples "bits of pavement" as well as their "own".
    • RAS
    • By RAS 12th Jan 10, 7:13 PM
    • 27,996 Posts
    • 48,414 Thanks
    RAS
    1. Hot water bottles - you can keep the bedroom temperature low and stay toasty.

    2. Even more so if you hunt out an old pair of socks with duff elastic and use them as bed-socks.

    3. If you are desparate (heating broken down etc), in the morning either use the residual heat from your hotty to take the edge of your freezing cold clothes before you dress or pour the warm water into the sink and use it to wash.

    4. Know where the torch, battery or wind-up radio, matches, candles and any camping cooker are kept and make sure they are charged up and ready to go if there is a power cut.

    5. Heavy snow on trees, bushes and plants can flatten them or cause branches to break. Use a long handled broom to give shake the snow off them if possible.

    6. Do not walk under icicles or immediately under gutters in a thaw; if the snow on the roof or the icicle falls you can get hurt.

    7. If you use grit from a public box, remember that a very light dusting is all that is needed for it to work. If you pile it on, your get super-cold ice. I dug inch thick grit off the road beside the box on my street and it was frozen solid when the temperature was barely freezing. Smashed up and applied thinly to inch-thick ice it worked.

    8. if you go sledging, check over the hill first; you do not want to blast off onto a road, over a road or into a hedge or a tree.
    The person who has not made a mistake, has made nothing
    • missdemeanour
    • By missdemeanour 12th Jan 10, 11:43 PM
    • 91 Posts
    • 326 Thanks
    missdemeanour
    Whisky. It works a treat.
  • Iheart2poundcoins
    If the path is icy but the road clear, walk on the right hand side towards the traffic.

    put a floater in your pond to keep a bit unfrozen.


    wear thermal underwear.

    for my baby I fill a little hot water bottle up for her and wrap a blanket round it and tuck itunder her blanket on the side on the settee, and I put one in her buggy too. Poundland sell them 2 for 1 for the bottles and 2 for 1 for the covers

    For bed I put a cardy on her with too long sleeves to help keep her hands warm.

    For daytime she wears a vest, tights, socks, pants, long sleeve top and a cardy and she's been warm enough.

    For bed she has: vest, pyjamas, cardy, 2.5 tog gro bag, then I put her hot water bottle under the bottom of her bag not touching her feet though when I go to bed and the heating is off.

    Do online shopping if you can. I have just started this and couldnt have got what I did myself.
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  • rootie
    you can't get a sledge for love or money, but my 2 and 5 year olds love riding on a tray with rope tied to the handles. i also take my 2 year olds microwave teddy with him to keep him cosy when outside. i made snowman sticky pictures and snowman marshmallows with the kids to keep them busy and snowman toilet rolls and birdcake!
  • sfocata
    Such a simple tip, but after slipping all over pavements in my work shoes and trainers, I started wearing my wellie boots, which have surprisingly good grip on the soles and stop any wetness getting to my feet.
    Originally posted by saraht
    Careful on very lumpy snow (especially if it's frozen underneath)... wellies don't have much ankle support. I've been using my chunkiest walking boots on fresh snow, because they're pretty rigid around the ankles.

    The only problem was that when the snow is compacted and frozen several times, the hard soles aren't so effective, so I switched to "outdoor leisure" type shoes... the ones that are half way between trainers and walking boots. They've got rubber grips in the soles, so they're perfect for ice.
  • philcdav
    winter tips (more)
    Six helpful hints for your car in the winter

    1. Keep yourheadlightsclear with car wax! Just wipe ordinary car wax on your headlights.
    It contains special water repellents that will prevent that messy mixture from accumulating on your lights - lasts 6 weeks.
    2. Squeak-proof your wipers with rubbing alcohol! Wipe the wipers with a cloth saturated with rubbing alcohol or ammonia. 1.
    This one trick can make badly streaking & squeaking wipers change to near perfect silence & clarity.
    3.. Ice-proof your windows with vinegar! Frost on it's way? Just fill a spray bottle with three parts vinegar to one part water & spritz it on all your windows at night.
    In the morning, they'll be clear of icy mess. Vinegar contains acetic acid, which raises the melting point of water---preventing water from freezing!
    4. Prevent car doors from freezing shut with cooking spray! Spritz cooking oil on the rubber seals around car doors & rub it in with a paper towel.
    The cooking spray prevents water from melting into the rubber.
    5. Fog-proof your windshield with shaving cream! Spray some shaving cream on the inside of your windshield & wipe if off with paper towels.
    Shaving cream has many of the same ingredients found in commercial defoggers.
    6. De-ice your lock in seconds with hand sanitizer! Just put some hand sanitizer gel on the key & the lock & the problems solved!

    This Forum Tip was included in MoneySavingExpert's weekly email

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    Last edited by MSE Deborah; 19-01-2010 at 7:49 PM.
  • fruugal
    Tealights or nightlights in bathrooms and loos make all the difference between pipes freezing or not

    Put the sink plug in overnight to stop the S bend freezing if you're not centrally heated. (I remember my mother being so cross when I forgot, as teenagers do, in the 60s.)

    I'm also leaving a tealight in its little glass dish in the footwell of the car when it is parked, and it does not take so long to defrost or warm up. I saw that done in Finland before.
  • Miss_Bubbles
    My daughter and i are wrapped in layers but i must admit i pop the heating/hot water on more than the usual 2hrs morning,2 hrs evening to keep pipes from freezing-very common in our house!

    Even with this awful weather the dog needs walking,im sticking to our usual route just to be safe and have found that when it comes to icy patches walking sideways helps to avoid slipping! Not sure why,my shoes arent exactly gripping!!
    Last edited by Miss_Bubbles; 13-01-2010 at 10:41 AM. Reason: missed words
    Little_Miss_Bubbles


    New and getting to grips with everything so please humour me!
    Mostly posting bits about me at the moment until i gain the confidence to post tips etc
    Keep smiling!!
    • grandma247
    • By grandma247 13th Jan 10, 10:51 AM
    • 2,386 Posts
    • 33,178 Thanks
    grandma247
    Whisky. It works a treat.
    Originally posted by missdemeanour
    My apologies if some one else has said this as I haven't read all of this page yet. Please do not drink alcohol if you are going out walking in the cold. Alcohol widens your blood vessels and sends the blood to the skin so cooling it quicker than it otherwise would. Normally when you are cold the blood retreats to your inner core to keep your vital organs working.
    Last edited by grandma247; 13-01-2010 at 11:03 AM.
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