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    • lil_miss_insanity
    • By lil_miss_insanity 24th Jun 06, 9:29 AM
    • 178 Posts
    • 100 Thanks
    lil_miss_insanity
    • #2
    • 24th Jun 06, 9:29 AM
    • #2
    • 24th Jun 06, 9:29 AM
    Oh dear - I'm in trouble again! I work for a well known high-street bank and have to sell our 'plus' account. One of the points I sell it on is the Red 24 ID theft assistance. Now I, like many, have been sold the scare stories, so thought it was a real benefit. Apparently not! I have come across one customer who's become victim to ID theft to the tune of a 17k car loan so felt justified. I now feel guilty again lol.

    It is so hard being a MoneySaver and working in a sales role especially for a bank! I'm always coming across things on here that make me feel totally evil for selling one product or another, or for having to justify charges and refuse refunds. Ah well, if I make it in journalism I won't have to worry about not meeting targets or being sacked for directing customers to this site!

    Hugs, Claire xxx
  • russjacks
    • #3
    • 24th Jun 06, 11:11 AM
    • #3
    • 24th Jun 06, 11:11 AM
    well i too use a shredder and tell all my frends they should do the same, better safe than sorry. but who did start up all the ID fraud fear?. after reading this blog i now see myself as one of many who has fallen for this con. if fact i dont know of any one who has been a victim of this fraud. surly if you spread fear in order to gain money from that fear, is't that some kind of fraud?. might sound daft but that shredder company has £30 of mine. LOL
    • Dumbledore55
    • By Dumbledore55 25th Jun 06, 10:34 AM
    • 1,360 Posts
    • 1,737 Thanks
    Dumbledore55
    • #4
    • 25th Jun 06, 10:34 AM
    • #4
    • 25th Jun 06, 10:34 AM
    I shred anything with bank account details, personal details like date of birth, credit card numbers etc but not if a letter just has my name and address. There's so many ways people can find out your name and address, I don't see the point in shredding that.

    www.b4usearch.com being one, telephone directory, electoral roll, ask a neighbour etc.

    I think its wise to be careful with your personal data but apart from that, if someone wants to find out who you are and use your name its easy enough.
  • Greenwellies
    • #5
    • 28th Jun 06, 9:39 AM
    • #5
    • 28th Jun 06, 9:39 AM
    I shed EVERYTHING whether it has my bank details or is just a pizza shop menu.

    Having said that, the days of 'dustbin raiders' are very rare now, it tends to be a tech version.

    An example of this was my dear mother.
    She only shops in 3 stores with her card. she never takes money out of the hole in the wall, but does cash back instead.

    She got a call from the bank that told her someone was using her card. She phoned me and told me. I was suspicious that this phone call was in fact a scam. I done some investigations and identified that it was in fact truthful.

    Although we can't identify which one of the stores it was, (all of them are large companies) it must have been cloned at the till as she actually keeps all her statments and receipts as a record.

    (she shreds standard mail and doesn't have a credit card)

    The most recent advertisment on the radio for computer software from an anti virus company will no doubt boost their sales, but as always there will be:
    1) free software to do the same job
    2) a way round it within a week

    GW
  • CPD17
    • #6
    • 28th Jun 06, 3:26 PM
    • #6
    • 28th Jun 06, 3:26 PM
    TIP: never carry your photocard driving licence in the same place as your credit / debit cards. If you lose them , the thief has your name, address, date of birth and bank details plus a form of ID with a scrappy photo that probably fits half the population.
    If the worst happens you can register a caution with one or more of the credit agencies that you are vulnerable to fraud because of stolen documents -- but that might slow down any future credit applications you make. You can also join a scheme that alerts you to any changes in your credit history, so will know if someone tries to get credit in your name. Each of these costs a little but the peace of mind was worth it to me.
  • zeenut
    • #7
    • 28th Jun 06, 6:01 PM
    bank ID ??
    • #7
    • 28th Jun 06, 6:01 PM
    I have been contacted by "the bank" recently, the caller asked my name and date of birth. I refused, explaining that she should first prove to me that she was "the bank". She then told me that she could not continue the conversation!!!! Who was she??? I rang "the bank's" Fraud team and was told I can set up a secret question that "the bank" must ask me in order to identify them as ligitimate cold callers. So my advice is to simply do the same if you are called by "the bank" in future, after all we have an equal right to "take them through security" and hopefully it blocks off any unscrupulous attempt to access our personal details. Not all of my banks offer this service and the best thing then is to call them back on a known number. Cuts both ways all this security malarchy eh???
  • uther pendragon
    • #8
    • 28th Jun 06, 8:39 PM
    id fraud
    • #8
    • 28th Jun 06, 8:39 PM
    my card protection company kept phoning me to try & sell me ID Fraud cover, I said I don't deal with people over the phone as I couldn't verify who they were. I was phoned 4 times in 1 week, & to prove who they were, THEY told me MY security details!!! It was only when I threatened to go elsewhere for my card protecrion they stopped phoning. If they had called the wrong person by mistake, that person would now have my security details.

    Also I service & maintain shredders & the majority of shredders don't like plastic i.e credit cards, especially crosscut shredders.

    If you are using a straight cut shredder don't feed anything in sideways, because your details can still be read.

    I use a garden incinerator
    • nemo183
    • By nemo183 29th Jun 06, 12:07 AM
    • 615 Posts
    • 266 Thanks
    nemo183
    • #9
    • 29th Jun 06, 12:07 AM
    Most fraud is basic.........
    • #9
    • 29th Jun 06, 12:07 AM
    Having had a quick scan through the thread, maybe it's important to mention that ID fraud, although becoming more common, is still relatively rare. It is a crime that requires a reasonable level of planning and thought.

    Credit Card fraud is much easier, and more simple. In theory, anyone who ever makes a CC transaction should NEVER let the card out of their sight. The most common problem often occurs in a bar or restaurant, if a card is left behind the bar or passed over when paying for a meal. Either gives the opportunity for all the card details, including the 3 digit security numbers to be recorded. Worst case senario is for someone who is visiting a local restaurant, and who has a slightly odd surname, to loose sight of the card.

    Sadly, even in the best restaurants, there is a high turnover of staff, many of whom have never been asked for references. It only needs one of these to forward details to a gang who have the time to match names to addresses...

    Having said this, when it happened to me I found that my card company were utterly supportive. But I'd hate to think what might happen if it ocurred again within a short period of time.
    • flyforfun
    • By flyforfun 29th Jun 06, 1:17 PM
    • 64 Posts
    • 23 Thanks
    flyforfun
    I'm a bit concerned about some of the screenscraper websites, including ones listed here. I used the link to search for home insurance and balked at giving my date of birth to it. So I made up details and used a neighbouring address. Lo and behold already 2 days later I'm getting spam from some company, not offering home insurance, but a debt consolidation website saying they got my details from this screenscraper website.

    Not very happy.
    • lil_miss_insanity
    • By lil_miss_insanity 29th Jun 06, 6:22 PM
    • 178 Posts
    • 100 Thanks
    lil_miss_insanity
    I have been contacted by "the bank" recently, the caller asked my name and date of birth. I refused, explaining that she should first prove to me that she was "the bank". She then told me that she could not continue the conversation!!!! Who was she??? I rang "the bank's" Fraud team and was told I can set up a secret question that "the bank" must ask me in order to identify them as ligitimate cold callers. So my advice is to simply do the same if you are called by "the bank" in future, after all we have an equal right to "take them through security" and hopefully it blocks off any unscrupulous attempt to access our personal details. Not all of my banks offer this service and the best thing then is to call them back on a known number. Cuts both ways all this security malarchy eh???
    by zeenut
    I have to say, as a representative of "the bank" telecontacting's a blooming nightmare! Luckily, it's not something I have to do all day every day. For data protection and FSA regs we *have* to confirm D.O.B. and postcode before we can even disclose which bank we are! We can get people to call us back via the call centre, but chances are we won't be at the same desk to take the return call, or it'll get lost along the way somewhere. To be honest, I wish there was no such thing as having to call customers! Even when they ask you to call on a certain date, they still don't want to talk to you! OK rant over - you do have a point, I agree...it's just very frustrating!
    • hss
    • By hss 29th Jun 06, 7:45 PM
    • 84 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    hss
    from Heather of Loughton Essex
    I would like to add my comments about this. I recently was the victim of debit card fraud, where someone had used the details OVER THE PHONE, to order goods from Argos and pay a BT bill. The first I was aware was when I received my bank statement and couldn't remember using my card for these.
    In particular, I use my debit card less often than my credit card and only use my debit card for cashback when paying at the supermarket, over the counter at my local 'bank' or VERY OCCASIONALLY the ATM INSIDE the branch. It is also used when paying by cheque for authorisation. I NEVER buy over the internet and am so careful about my security. My husband would say I was a bit paranoid when using it.
    My main concern though is with all this hype and publicity about the chip & pin, are you aware that when you pay by debit or credit cards, we, the customer, are given back the copy where some numbers have been **** out, yet the RETAILERS MERCHANT COPY has ALL the numbers, including the EXPIRY DATE, therefore any dishonest member of staff could steal a slip or copy it and pass it onto a gang.
    Out of curiousity, we thought we would pay our phone bill over the phone using my husbands debit card, and at NO TIME did we speak to a human voice. It was all automated, just pushing the numbers on the keypad on your phone, including those 3 numbers on the reverse of the card.
    Is it any wonder then that it can be so easy to commit these crimes over the phone when no-one is asking for even the name/address of the cardholder?
    I DO WISH MARTIN WOULD READ THIS AND START A CAMPAIGN. Afterall what is the point of remembering your chip & pin, when you don't even need it over the phone?
    I am happy to say my money has now been refunded, nearly 500, (and hopefully those responsible caught??), but I assumed either the FSA or OFT were responsible for the rules and regulations, but they are not and didn't want to know.
    PLEASE can someone change this so that WE THE CUSTOMER are given the slip with all the numbers and the retailer get the ones with the numbers ***. Better still, make ALL COPIES *** so no-one can steal them.
    Finally, Wetherspoons actually offered (and I accepted) to exchange my copy for theirs because I noticed it had all the numbers printed and told them I had been a victim of fraud. I feel if we demanded other retailers did the same, it would then not be so easy for this crime to be committed.
    MARTIN PLEASE HELP. Start a campaign! Speak on Jeremy Vine's prog. because no-one seems aware of this. Thank you.
  • A penny saved
    It is interesting that Chip and Pin was promoted as a security measure yet I recently received a flyer from the bank telling me that Chip and Pon made it easier for tyhe unscrupulous to steal my identity and I should therefore subscribe to their insurance scheme.... As you say, promote the fear and then rake in the profits!

    Thanks for so much useful advice.
    • IvanOpinion
    • By IvanOpinion 1st Jul 06, 8:27 AM
    • 20,012 Posts
    • 19,844 Thanks
    IvanOpinion
    Personally I think it is all being excessively over hyped .. there has always been a risk of identity theft and fraud, it is just that in this day and age with electronic technology things can happen faster and with less validation.

    It reminds me of the hype over computer viruses etc. .. I sometimes wonder are the only people devleoping these viruses possibly the virus detection software companies?

    Ivan
    Ivan has left the building ... but reserves the right of reply!
    Use PM to keep in touch
    • spender
    • By spender 1st Jul 06, 5:01 PM
    • 1,130 Posts
    • 983 Thanks
    spender
    I paid for our summer holiday over the telephone with my daughters interest free credit card (Over 2,000). I was absolutely horrified to find the system automated and the card credited for my holiday especially since my daughter has a different surname that does not relate to anybody going on the holiday.
    No Matter what you do there will be critics.
  • archived user
    I paid for our summer holiday over the telephone with my daughters interest free credit card (Over 2,000). I was absolutely horrified to find the system automated and the card credited for my holiday especially since my daughter has a different surname that does not relate to anybody going on the holiday.
    by spender
    Yes thats happened to me, MrJudi has placed an online order using my credit card details (with my permission of course because i get cashback on it). Makes you shudder dunnit?
  • clipboard2
    Tesco - pin number/signature not required!
    If ever I Became a card thief, I'd head straight down to Tesco. Their self service checkouts simply invite you to slide your plastic down the slot. Payment is taken frfom the card. Receipt comes out of the machine. No signature or pin number required. Voila! What could be easier!!
  • wigginsmum
    Someone phoned Abbey National, impersonating DH, and managed to steal a month's salary. We never did get an explanation or an apology (try talking to their Fraud Dept in India!), although the bank eventually refunded the money into a new account. Caused us no end of aggro trying to survive that month.
    The ability of skinny old ladies to carry huge loads is phenomenal. An ant can carry one hundred times its own weight, but there is no known limit to the lifting power of the average tiny eighty-year-old Spanish peasant grandmother.
  • lola_r_hamster
    My main concern though is with all this hype and publicity about the chip & pin, are you aware that when you pay by debit or credit cards, we, the customer, are given back the copy where some numbers have been **** out, yet the RETAILERS MERCHANT COPY has ALL the numbers, including the EXPIRY DATE, therefore any dishonest member of staff could steal a slip or copy it and pass it onto a gang.
    by hss
    I have been done this way - when paying for a take-away. The first i knew was when my card company called me up at 9pm to ask whether i had just purchased a fridge/freezer and tv costing a few grand on some sky shopping channel - as it didnt match my usual shopping habits??? - they know so much about us it can be frightening

    Luckily the daft prat requested that it was delivered to his home address???? so apart from a police statement the credit card company sorted it all out.

    Unfortunetly, as he is a member of the family, he continues to work at the local takeaway!

    My advise - watch out for the little man - as he will get smarter- , as well as the gangs.
  • lola_r_hamster
    If ever I Became a card thief, I'd head straight down to Tesco. Their self service checkouts simply invite you to slide your plastic down the slot. Payment is taken frfom the card. Receipt comes out of the machine. No signature or pin number required. Voila! What could be easier!!
    by clipboard2
    Then dont forget to fill up at asda automated petrol pump - no pin required just pop you stolen card in and fill up your stolen car - it's too easy

    LOL
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