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  • moggylover
    I can remember EXACTLY what you mean, even after 40 years. Usually on a Friday lunchtime for some reason. A meanly-thin slice of greasy pastry filled with some pallid cheesy stuff. Served floating in the lukewarm watery juice of some tinned plum tomatoes with a scoop of lumpy mash.

    I can remember vividly to this day the bitter disappointment , after queuing up outside the canteen, freezing cold and starving, to discover that this was the dish of the day ....and I was a child that ate ANYTHING!!
    Originally posted by Bronnie

    The cook from your school needed sacking them because at both my primary and senior schools it was a truly beautiful egg and cheese flan and was so popular that there was never any left for seconds.

    The only thing I hated was the salad that had grated carrot and peanuts on it! I didn't like nuts as a child at all, and still do not much care for grated carrot although I love cooked ones.
    "there are some persons in this World who, unable to give better proof of being wise, take a strange delight in showing what they think they have sagaciously read in mankind by uncharitable suspicions of them"
    (Herman Melville)
    • Bronnie
    • By Bronnie 23rd May 09, 12:32 AM
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    Bronnie
    I think in those days they liked you to go home for lunch really, maybe the meals were meant to act as a deterrent! I only stayed dinners very occasionally if my mum had a hospital appointment or something, unfortunately a disproportionate number of those occasions seemed to feature the hideous cheese pie and tinned toms for lunch!
    • Pont
    • By Pont 23rd May 09, 1:08 AM
    • 1,419 Posts
    • 1,493 Thanks
    Pont
    The cook from your school needed sacking them because at both my primary and senior schools it was a truly beautiful egg and cheese flan and was so popular that there was never any left for seconds.

    The only thing I hated was the salad that had grated carrot and peanuts on it! I didn't like nuts as a child at all, and still do not much care for grated carrot although I love cooked ones.
    Originally posted by moggylover
    Oh moggylover, I forgot about the carrot and nut salad. I'm perhaps a little sad but I loved it. It's now 2.00am but I feel a sudden yearning to make it - right now! How come you all had this pastry based pie? Ours was like a cheese based mash.
    Mash potatoes with butter, milk and cream (never allowed now)
    Add diced onion
    Stir in loads of cheddar cheese (probably not allowed now as well)
    Put in dish and put under the grill till browned and crispy
    Eat
  • BitterAndTwisted
    My sister and I went to a sort of boarding school where the food was so poor when we had lunch served at day-school it was like eating at the Dorchester. They served that molten-lava cheese pie thing as well and it was one of our favourites. I'd forgotten all about it until I read this thread. Oh, happy days!

    The boarding school's idea of a suitable evening meal on the cook's day off was cold tinned tomatoes served with cold pilchards. Sorry that was one cold pilchard. Mind you, I think it stood us in good stead, we were never, ever faddy eaters after that. We still aren't.
    • gizmo111
    • By gizmo111 23rd May 09, 1:11 AM
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    gizmo111
    Can anyone remember pease pudding ? Does it still exist?
    • Quillion
    • By Quillion 23rd May 09, 8:53 AM
    • 1,755 Posts
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    Quillion
    Two recipies both quite diefferent.
    Adele from Sheffield
    Here is the cheese pie recipe, hope you enjoy (my mother in law used to work in the school kitchens):
    8oz plain flour
    2oz butter
    2oz lard
    1 small onion
    2 eggs beaten into half pint milk
    loads of cheese (mature red is best)
    Method: rub the flour and fat to form breadcrumbs add a little water to make a dough, roll out and place in flan dish, blind bake for about 10 mins.
    Remove from oven, add chopped onion and grate cheese until flan dish full (about half a pound) pour in egg and milk mix, cook in oven for about 30 mins at 160. Voila school cheesepie.

    and

    Isa Lancashire Lass, Derbyshire
    The great school cheese pie of the 1970s recipe.Yes - I think I've cracked it. I made this last night and the taste and texture match what I remember. Use a rectangular brownie tin to make it inLine the tin with pastry and up the sides. Mix 5 ozs grated mature cheddar (or cheese to your liking) with approx 10 ozs cottage cheese, 1 whole medium egg, 4 ozs milk. Bake blind the pastry alone for 10 mins at 210 oC. Pour in cheese mix and cook in oven at 170 oC (fan oven) may need 180 oC/190 oC for non-fan oven) for approx 30 mins or until top is set and golden. This pie has the lumpy (from the cottage cheese), tangy feel that I recall. It passed the family taste test. Enjoy.

    Will have to just try both xx

    Not pregnanat Toots just the Food Porn again lol apparantly its quite a common side effect.
    Last edited by Quillion; 23-05-2009 at 8:55 AM.
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  • moggylover
    ;21804101]Oh moggylover, I forgot about the carrot and nut salad. I'm perhaps a little sad but I loved it.[/COLOR] It's now 2.00am but I feel a sudden yearning to make it - right now! How come you all had this pastry based pie? Ours was like a cheese based mash.
    Mash potatoes with butter, milk and cream (never allowed now)
    Add diced onion
    Stir in loads of cheddar cheese (probably not allowed now as well)
    Put in dish and put under the grill till browned and crispy
    Eat
    by Pont[COLOR=red

    Not at all sad! Just personal taste. I'm not (and have never been) a particularly fussy eater as long as the food is well prepared but I preferred my salad without those bits. I actually had the audacity to put it to the school cook (back around 1970!!!!) and she started serving the salads in separate sections and found that a lot of the kids took to it better that way, although the presentation did not look as pretty as the trays with everything on them did.

    I am amazed at some of the things they do not put on the menu at school nowadays tbh, and remember the cooking at both of my schools as being very good (but then they WERE proper trained cooks in those days and my mother worked in another school where the cook was also extremely good). We did not get all the "choices" that todays kids get: but I actually think that was a good thing and must certainly have made the budget easier to meet/beat with less wastage and also prevented the situation my son complains about which is that often those on the later sittings cannot get the meal they would have chosen (especially on Roast day) because the earlier sittings have already scoffed it.

    Having said this, both my kids like the school meals at their school and they do appear to be reasonably healthy choices most of the time. I'm not in favour of excluding things like cheese and butter because they "may" be fattening for those kids who choose not to get enough exercise: I think there are better ways to deal with this and that a good diet contains all that nature provides and little that man has messed with.

    We got good basic food in my day (albeit it seems from this thread that some of the cooks were not quite as good as they should have been) and very few kids were overweight. I personally think that the schools are not to blame for the weight problems anyway and that the over-abundance of fizzy junk drinks and crisps and snacks in many homes are the worst culprits, amply aided by the lack of physical exercise that was taken for granted in my day (like walking to school).

    I remember a particular favourite in our school were sort of meatballs containing rice which for some reason we all called "hedgehogs". They were quite seasoned for those day and were another one of those where there were seldom any seconds but I have never been able to re-create these either.

    Ah the memories, liver and bacon in onion gravy, syrup sponge and custard, treacle tart, the cheese flan. Getting hungry now
    "there are some persons in this World who, unable to give better proof of being wise, take a strange delight in showing what they think they have sagaciously read in mankind by uncharitable suspicions of them"
    (Herman Melville)
    • queenpig
    • By queenpig 23rd May 09, 4:45 PM
    • 417 Posts
    • 2,832 Thanks
    queenpig
    Can anyone remember pease pudding ? Does it still exist?
    Originally posted by gizmo111
    In school dinners I don't know, but it still does exist...you can buy it in the chillers in Asda or at least I got mine from there today. Maybe its a regional thing though I'm from Tyne & Wear? xx
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    • sidefx
    • By sidefx 23rd May 09, 4:47 PM
    • 1,145 Posts
    • 2,754 Thanks
    sidefx
    Oh no in our school cheese pie was wonderful. Nothing like quiche, no pastry. Ours was fluffy mashed potato, buttery with melted cheese and onion mixed in. It was so molten it took the roof of your mouth off - but it was just beautiful. I attempt to make it for my tenagers now - they love it, but to me it never tastes as good as when I was 8 or 9 years of age.
    Originally posted by Pont
    I remember having something like that

    it was
  • Intergalactic Floozie

    Isa Lancashire Lass, Derbyshire
    The great school cheese pie of the 1970s recipe.Yes - I think I've cracked it. I made this last night and the taste and texture match what I remember. Use a rectangular brownie tin to make it inLine the tin with pastry and up the sides. Mix 5 ozs grated mature cheddar (or cheese to your liking) with approx 10 ozs cottage cheese, 1 whole medium egg, 4 ozs milk. Bake blind the pastry alone for 10 mins at 210 oC. Pour in cheese mix and cook in oven at 170 oC (fan oven) may need 180 oC/190 oC for non-fan oven) for approx 30 mins or until top is set and golden. This pie has the lumpy (from the cottage cheese), tangy feel that I recall. It passed the family taste test. Enjoy.

    Will have to just try both xx

    Not pregnanat Toots just the Food Porn again lol apparantly its quite a common side effect.
    Originally posted by Quillion
    DROOL! I think I will definitely have to give thjat one a try, it sounds delicious (and simple, which is a must)
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  • anguk
    In school dinners I don't know, but it still does exist...you can buy it in the chillers in Asda or at least I got mine from there today. Maybe its a regional thing though I'm from Tyne & Wear? xx
    Originally posted by queenpig
    I think it may be a regional thing, my son has moved down to London and can never find any in the shops so when he comes home he always takes some back down with him. All the supermarkets and most butchers sell it up here.

    We call it "Geordie Hummus"!
    • Waggle Dancer
    • By Waggle Dancer 23rd May 09, 7:42 PM
    • 246 Posts
    • 225 Thanks
    Waggle Dancer
    Can anyone remember pease pudding ? Does it still exist?
    Originally posted by gizmo111
    There is a company called Foresight that makes it in tins. I think I've seen it in Tesco.

    My worst school dinner was the pilchard with the head still on. Mind you it looked more alive than some of the nuns.
    • mcjordi
    • By mcjordi 23rd May 09, 10:54 PM
    • 4,146 Posts
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    mcjordi
    i think i can remember something similar when i was at junior school

    although i loved the sausages and bbq sauce hmmm

    pease pudding is available, ive seen the tins of pease pudding about as well
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    • Mrs_Ryan
    • By Mrs_Ryan 23rd May 09, 11:52 PM
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    Mrs_Ryan
    I live in Leicester but I'm originally from the north-east.. I grew up eating ham and pease pudding sandwiches and now OH has discovered he loves the stuff so I always have to take some home for him when I've been home
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  • mashup
    Stotties in the south
    I remember going back up to Durham on the Rapide coach and the Hostesses sold ham and pease pudding stotties to keep us going. I now live in Surrey and Asda have started selling stotties down here. So ham and pease pudding stotties all round.
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 25th May 09, 8:19 AM
    • 16,922 Posts
    • 144,912 Thanks
    JackieO
    I only had school dinners for a week when my late Mum had to go to Scotland to look after her sick sister.
    My Mum bless her wasn't the best cook in the world it was usually basic stuff and no frills as rationing was still around but she cooked far better than the school lunches.
    Lumpy mash, greens that were almost black and the meat was mostly fatty and grey looking.The gravy had a smell of its own and I could pick it out from a thousand blindfolded.You didn't have a choice either you had to eat it or else. I liked the custard but the sponge puddings were like rocks and I think had been boiled in old socks.I dreaded the school dinners but as my Dad was working it wasn't a choice, I couldn't not stay. Even now over 60 years later I can remember that week of revolting food. My children had packed lunches as I wasn't going to put them through being made to eat food they wouldn't like. I aslo remeber gipsy tart which I think was made with floor polish it tasted so bad, I stuck mine into my shoe bag and disposed of it on the way home from school.My plimsolls were never the same after that
    • noonesperfect
    • By noonesperfect 25th May 09, 9:35 AM
    • 1,823 Posts
    • 1,307 Thanks
    noonesperfect
    My sister and I went to a sort of boarding school where the food was so poor when we had lunch served at day-school it was like eating at the Dorchester. They served that molten-lava cheese pie thing as well and it was one of our favourites. I'd forgotten all about it until I read this thread. Oh, happy days!

    The boarding school's idea of a suitable evening meal on the cook's day off was cold tinned tomatoes served with cold pilchards. Sorry that was one cold pilchard. Mind you, I think it stood us in good stead, we were never, ever faddy eaters after that. We still aren't.
    Originally posted by BitterAndTwisted
    I don't know what it's like now but boarding school food in the 70's was dire!!! Everything was sooooo greasy and usually nearly cold...and nary in a chip in sight (well, maybe now and again - occasional Friday treat of "inhouse" fish and chips.)
    Like you say, portions were anything but generous!!
    The cheese pie we got was the awful greasy and somehow very damp version with pastry and a peculiar eggy filling. Sausage pie was worse tho', gristly sausagemeat balls and tinned tomatoes under a topping of sliced potatoes. I shudder when I think of the globules of grease .

    You had no choice but to eat every morsel - including fat and gristle.

    No wonder I still love puddings to this day - they were the only edible part of the meal (apart from the lumpy custard - complete with skin)

    Re: pease pud - it's available fresh in Aldi as well as Asda.
    Last edited by noonesperfect; 25-05-2009 at 9:40 AM.
    • Rikki
    • By Rikki 25th May 09, 9:44 AM
    • 20,648 Posts
    • 21,773 Thanks
    Rikki
    I can remember EXACTLY what you mean, even after 40 years. Usually on a Friday lunchtime for some reason. A meanly-thin square of greasy pastry filled with some pallid cheesy stuff. Served floating in the lukewarm watery juice of some tinned plum tomatoes with a scoop of lumpy mash.
    Originally posted by Bronnie
    I was trying to remember exactly what it was and then when you mentioned, lukewarm watery tinned tomatoes and the lumpy mash. I remembered.
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    • jo1972
    • By jo1972 25th May 09, 10:54 AM
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    jo1972
    I've just been having a nostalgic moment after seeing the tins of Spam in Sainsburys, I used to love the spam fritters at school! I knew they'd be a school recipe thread or two on here and have had spent the last half hour or more imersed in school dinner memories!

    I have found a good website that has some old classics on, apologies if it's been linked before, but there is some delicious stuff on here including spam fritters
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    • Waggle Dancer
    • By Waggle Dancer 25th May 09, 6:26 PM
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    Waggle Dancer
    I've just been having a nostalgic moment after seeing the tins of Spam in Sainsburys, I used to love the spam fritters at school!
    Originally posted by jo1972
    We didn't have Spam, we used to have "Plumrose Plopped Ham with Chalk!"
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