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  • FIRST POST
    • tiff
    • By tiff 2nd Mar 05, 2:45 PM
    • 6,551Posts
    • 8,597Thanks
    tiff
    American cookery terms
    • #1
    • 2nd Mar 05, 2:45 PM
    American cookery terms 2nd Mar 05 at 2:45 PM
    I prefer to use American recipes as they use cups which I find easier to remember and use. I'm trying to make a banana and walnut loaf and the recipe uses baking soda, another recipe I looked at used baking powder.

    So is baking soda - bicarbonate of soda? and is baking powder what we call baking powder? HELP! lol
    A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went. - Dave Ramsey
Page 1
  • fazer6
    • #2
    • 2nd Mar 05, 2:55 PM
    • #2
    • 2nd Mar 05, 2:55 PM
    I attempted a banana and walnut loaf at the weekend, it had bicarb of soda and baking powder in the recipie. I only had baking powder so I substituted the bicarb for baking powder, don't know if it was that or because I didn't premix in my breadmaker but it was a disaster. Next time I think I'll try self raising flour.
  • Galtizz
    • #3
    • 2nd Mar 05, 2:57 PM
    • #3
    • 2nd Mar 05, 2:57 PM
    Pretty sure that you are correct.

    Baking soda is Bicarbonate of soda and baking powder is baking powder.

    Baking soda/ bicarb is baking powder with some cream of tartare in it. (incase you have run out and have some baking powder and cream of tatare lying about )

    One is used for recipes with acid in and one for alkaline ingredients (but I can't remember which way round it is.)
    When life hands you a lemon, make sure you ask for tequilla and salt
    • tiff
    • By tiff 2nd Mar 05, 3:02 PM
    • 6,551 Posts
    • 8,597 Thanks
    tiff
    • #4
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:02 PM
    • #4
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:02 PM
    Thanks Galtizz, I've never bought cream of tartar, would have put that on ones fish lol!

    So, can I get away with making something that calls for both ingredients but I only have bicarb in?
    A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went. - Dave Ramsey
  • Galtizz
    • #5
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:16 PM
    • #5
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:16 PM
    Big long explaination here:

    Click here


    I got it the wrong way around, Baking powder contains cream of tartre

    Fazer6 I think your disaster was all to do with acid in the recipe, I think there was propably too much, as baking powder already contains acid. If you had only had baking soda you could probably have added a bit of honey (an acid aparently) and it would have been alright :confused:
    Last edited by squeaky; 10-02-2008 at 11:22 AM.
    When life hands you a lemon, make sure you ask for tequilla and salt
    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 2nd Mar 05, 3:24 PM
    • 13,149 Posts
    • 9,492 Thanks
    Debt_Free_Chick
    • #6
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:24 PM
    • #6
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:24 PM
    This suggests that Baking Soda is Bicarb of Soda

    http://thefoody.com/glossary/translate.html
  • fazer6
    • #7
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:35 PM
    • #7
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:35 PM
    So which does self raising flour have in it then? Can I just replace plain flour and bicarb/baking soda with just self raising flour?

    Do you know I've always wondered what rutabaga was since reading it on a branston pickle jar. I also always thought broiled was like boiled.
  • Galtizz
    • #8
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:48 PM
    • #8
    • 2nd Mar 05, 3:48 PM
    Interesting conversion and substitution site here for US to english and other bits:

    http://www.wwrecipes.com/convert.htm

    Re slef raising flour it says 'Self-raising flour contains 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt for each cup of flour'
    When life hands you a lemon, make sure you ask for tequilla and salt
    • tiff
    • By tiff 2nd Mar 05, 4:05 PM
    • 6,551 Posts
    • 8,597 Thanks
    tiff
    • #9
    • 2nd Mar 05, 4:05 PM
    • #9
    • 2nd Mar 05, 4:05 PM
    Fazer, I think Rutabaga is swede and broiled actually means grilled I think!
    A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went. - Dave Ramsey
  • halloweenqueen
    I use baking powder, unless you are making something like cookies or pastry I use SR flour still when it asks for all purpose flour, a stick of butter is a cup or around 8 oz. I use www.recipezaar.com or www.tollhouse.co.uk
  • HOLsale
    Those Crazy Americans
    as many of you know i'm an american expat that's been in scotland for just shy of 7 years now

    i've often answered questions concerning conversion between weights and measures and food substitutions or 'what exactly IS 'XXX'?' type questions

    i thought i'd start this thread to offer anyone to ask any of those questions you've been wanting to know because let's face it, at least 80% of recipes online are american based (sad but true!)

    also, i got a pm asking for help, and couldn't actually send my reply because the recipients pm box is full... hope you don't mind me posting it here akronite babe, i thought it would be a good starting place

    Hi holsale,

    hope you don't mind, but I wondered if you could help me out on clarifying a few american cookery terms??

    I have a muffin recipe book and in it one of the recipes I want to try asks for shortening. What is it?? I have no idea and I don't want to substitute anything else incase it messes up the recipe.

    Thanks in advance!!


    arkonite_babe
    by arkonite_babe
    shortening is weird! it's the consistency of not quite room temperature butter but it's actually oil... it's thick and white (normally)... i just use butter (not margerine)

    as for muffins and shortening, ewwwww

    i'd recommend plain old veg oil instead, or again butter...

    feel free to ask me about american stuff any time

    c

    Last edited by MSE Archna; 07-03-2006 at 2:42 PM.
    founder of Frugal Genius UK (Yahoo Groups)
    • Strepsy
    • By Strepsy 4th Mar 06, 7:35 AM
    • 5,562 Posts
    • 38,226 Thanks
    Strepsy
    Ooh ooh, I had a recipe once that asked for Graham wafers? What would you use to substitute?

    I might finally be able to try it now if I can find it!
    Last edited by Strepsy; 04-03-2006 at 7:47 AM.
    • nikiyoung
    • By nikiyoung 4th Mar 06, 7:57 AM
    • 569 Posts
    • 190 Thanks
    nikiyoung
    Thanks for this post HOLsale
    What are the different types of flour? They seem to use different ones to us.
    Niki
    • Swan
    • By Swan 4th Mar 06, 8:43 AM
    • 6,633 Posts
    • 7,400 Thanks
    Swan
    American Cocoa
    what a good idea for a thread HOLsale
    I think you're going to find yourself very busy!

    I've worked out a fair few of the American/British terms over the years, but one that's bothering me just now* is ...

    what does it mean when an American recipe asks for 'cocoa'?
    is it the same dark, bitter, unsweetened powder we have here? or is it like our drinking chocolate, sweetened & sometimes with other flavourings added? or is it something entirely different?

    *DD wants me to attempt a copycat Starbuck's hot chocolate recipe
    • bizzy_lizzie
    • By bizzy_lizzie 4th Mar 06, 9:56 AM
    • 203 Posts
    • 144 Thanks
    bizzy_lizzie
    Excellent idea HOLsale. I am often left wondering about substitutes as American recipes often seem to specify a make of something rather than an item.
    But ofcourse can I remember a single questions now, nope, not a one.

    Thanks anyway for the thought!
    Building an emergency fund and starting on the mortgage!
    • moggins
    • By moggins 4th Mar 06, 10:36 AM
    • 5,177 Posts
    • 10,159 Thanks
    moggins
    Corn Syrup? Is there a british equivalent. I want to make fruit leathers as I think these are better for the kids than the fruit winders they have fallen in love with but all the recipes seem to call for corn syrup and it can't be found anywhere in this country.
    Organised people are just too lazy to look for things

    F U Fund currently at 250
    • arkonite_babe
    • By arkonite_babe 4th Mar 06, 9:36 PM
    • 7,256 Posts
    • 8,306 Thanks
    arkonite_babe
    moggins, I can buy corn syrup in my local asian grocers. It's in asian mind you but it costs about 1 for a 500 ml bottle. I have used it before with no probs. HTH
    • arkonite_babe
    • By arkonite_babe 4th Mar 06, 9:37 PM
    • 7,256 Posts
    • 8,306 Thanks
    arkonite_babe
    HOLsale, you will have quite a few pm's from me
    • moggins
    • By moggins 4th Mar 06, 9:40 PM
    • 5,177 Posts
    • 10,159 Thanks
    moggins
    moggins, I can buy corn syrup in my local asian grocers. It's in asian mind you but it costs about 1 for a 500 ml bottle. I have used it before with no probs. HTH
    by arkonite_babe
    Do you know what it's called? We have a couple of really good asian grocers here and if I knew what I was looking for I might find it there?
    Organised people are just too lazy to look for things

    F U Fund currently at 250
    • Chris25
    • By Chris25 5th Mar 06, 9:06 AM
    • 12,776 Posts
    • 12,609 Thanks
    Chris25
    Ooh ooh, I had a recipe once that asked for Graham wafers? What would you use to substitute?

    I might finally be able to try it now if I can find it!
    by Strepsy

    same as digestive biscuits

    also, shortening - use solid white vegetable fat blocks like Trex
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