Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • kittie
    • By kittie 11th Jan 06, 12:39 PM
    • 12,446Posts
    • 78,966Thanks
    kittie
    sprouting seeds**to eat**
    • #1
    • 11th Jan 06, 12:39 PM
    sprouting seeds**to eat** 11th Jan 06 at 12:39 PM
    I have been sprouting seeds on and off for over 30 years. Mainly during the winter time and particularly between the months of january and june, when there is a `hungry gap` in the organic veg scene. The benefits of eating seed sprouts are huge and here is just a starter
    http://www.living-foods.com/articles/sproutbenefits.html

    It is very easy and cheap to start at a basic level and alfalfa is probably the best and nicest beginner seed. It is lovely raw on sandwiches and in salads. It has a lovely mild taste

    This is what I used when I started:
    1 large jar (kilner type with large opening)
    piece of stocking or tights
    elastic band to put around stocking lid
    organic alfalfa seeds (beanfreaks or cheaper on net)

    put a desertspoon of seeds in jar and soak in water for a few hours. Strain and rinse with cold water through the mesh. Leave upside down at an angle to drain. Repeat the rinsing a few times a day. Seeds will be ready when the coats start to fall off. Take out and rinse in a bowl of water. Scoop seedlings up, drain and store in a lidded box in fridge. Takes about 4 days or so

    Easy peasy. You can graduate onto bought sprouters and my final one at home is a big round one that rinses automatically

    I use alfalfa, radish, broccolli, fenugreek, aduki etc Don`t bother trying the large seeds in this jar method as the jars are too small.

    Official MoneySavingExpert insert: Thanks to kittie for starting this great thread. Now that Spring has sprung, it's a great time to think about growing your own fruit and veg and a great way to save money too!

    This Forum Tip was included in MoneySavingExpert's weekly email

    Don't miss out on new deals, loopholes, and vouchers

    Last edited by Former MSE Debs; 10-04-2012 at 12:00 PM.
Page 1
    • kiwichick
    • By kiwichick 11th Jan 06, 12:42 PM
    • 1,836 Posts
    • 2,828 Thanks
    kiwichick
    • #2
    • 11th Jan 06, 12:42 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Jan 06, 12:42 PM
    YUM YUM. I do this too, my absolute FAVE is sprouted mung beans, nice and crunchy, perfect for salads.
    WW Start Weight 18/04/12 = 19st 11lbs
    Weight today = 17st 6.5lbs
    Loss to date 32.5lbs!!!
    • comping cat
    • By comping cat 11th Jan 06, 12:46 PM
    • 23,808 Posts
    • 3,165,181 Thanks
    comping cat
    • #3
    • 11th Jan 06, 12:46 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Jan 06, 12:46 PM
    Hope this isnt a silly question, but can you use this method for bean sprouts? and where do you buy your seeds form? Thanks, Catherine x
    • kittie
    • By kittie 11th Jan 06, 1:18 PM
    • 12,446 Posts
    • 78,966 Thanks
    kittie
    • #4
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:18 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:18 PM
    Bean sprouts are just sprouted mung beans. I have made them loads of times. You need to soak the seeds overnight. You could use the jar method but you shouldn`t put many seeds in as they grow big and wouldn`t have enough room.

    Tesco will do
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 11th Jan 06, 1:20 PM
    • 9,089 Posts
    • 28,909 Thanks
    thriftlady
    • #5
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:20 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:20 PM
    I sprout mung beans too,these are the ones used for beansprouts.I've got some on the go at the moment.They don't turn out as straight and pale as the ones in the shops,they're curlier and you get the delicious greenskins to(you can wash these off if you really want to).

    Mung beans are available in some supermarkets or in any health food shop.I use 2 tbsp at a time,a packet lasts for ages.I find them invaluable in winter when I don't buy lettuce(I like to buy seasonal and local).They're particularly good in cheese toasties with a dollop of mayo.I think they taste nuttier than ready-sprouted bean sprouts.
    • comping cat
    • By comping cat 11th Jan 06, 1:22 PM
    • 23,808 Posts
    • 3,165,181 Thanks
    comping cat
    • #6
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:22 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:22 PM
    Thank you kittie, think i will give that a go, especially as i tried to buy some bean sprouts yesterday in Morrisons, and they didnt have any!!!! Would be nice to grow my own!!!
    Catherine x
    • comping cat
    • By comping cat 11th Jan 06, 1:24 PM
    • 23,808 Posts
    • 3,165,181 Thanks
    comping cat
    • #7
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:24 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:24 PM
    Also, i think my children might eat them if they helped grow them!!!!
  • Loadsabob
    • #8
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:52 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:52 PM
    I regularly eat sprouted seeds, but have yet to sprout my own. 2006 will be the year for that, I think! (I keep getting mixed sprouted seeds in my organic box, and they're not really all that fresh, so they've been putting me off a little).

    Just to say, though, that when I was eating these daily (in my lunchtime sandwich and maybe a tablespoon scattered over my evening meal) I felt a lot more full of energy. I can only describe myself as more vital when these are a regular part of my diet. Stands to reason really, they're SO GOOD for you! I think alfalfa is a complete protein, too, so ideal for veggies!
    • ronankfan
    • By ronankfan 11th Jan 06, 1:54 PM
    • 711 Posts
    • 1,869 Thanks
    ronankfan
    • #9
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:54 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Jan 06, 1:54 PM
    I am going to have a go at growing my own - i also agree with catowen i think my children would find it interesting seeing them grow and that might encourage them to eat them
  • ravenlooney
    Apparently you can survive on eating nothing but alfalfa sprouts as they contain absolutely everything you need to sustain. I think Id need buckets of them to stay full though!! Sprouts are definetly a superfood in their own right and are sooooo good for you. My children love almost any sprouted seed and munch them straight out of the jar! All children I know eat them here when I serve them and to be honest, they are so difficult for kids not to like them as theyre just so delicious. Oh, and its really fun sprouting them too!!
    • Mr Proctalgia
    • By Mr Proctalgia 11th Jan 06, 10:10 PM
    • 961 Posts
    • 818 Thanks
    Mr Proctalgia
    Just a quick question, Do you grow the seeds in the dark or not?
    Last edited by Mr Proctalgia; 12-01-2006 at 10:54 AM. Reason: Edited for rubbish spelling!
    • kittie
    • By kittie 12th Jan 06, 8:55 AM
    • 12,446 Posts
    • 78,966 Thanks
    kittie
    yes they grow in the dark. Just use whatever facility you have
  • Queenie
    OMG!! How funny!!

    I've literally just posted about this in the daily thread! Sorry hadn't seen this thread.

    Just a quick question, Go you grow the seeds in the dark or not?
    by Mr Proctalgia
    Mine are grown on the kitchen windowsil.

    I don't use the jar method - wasn't successful for me. But I did buy a 3-tier effort alst Autumn and the 6 it cost me is well worth the investment.

    I buy my seeds from our local health food store. I've recently been experimenting with their 3-day sprouting seeds and I have to say they are de-LISH!

    Once ready you can store them in the fridge for a few days too.

    Can't believe that 12yrs ago I was buying them, ready sprouted (!) from Sainsbury's at .70p a pack on the salad stand ... ... now I can buy a 600g pack of mixed seeds to grow myself just 1.54 and it will last ages! Yes, even with daily eats

    catowen - my boys enjoy eating "their" home grown/home made foods and half the fun is watching them grow; I'm sure your kids will enjoy them too just for that reason
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PMS Pot: 57.53 Pigsback Pot: 23.00
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    • kittie
    • By kittie 20th Jan 06, 4:56 PM
    • 12,446 Posts
    • 78,966 Thanks
    kittie
    Just wondering how you are doing with the seeds. Since the OP I have sprouted and eaten mung beans (bean sprouts) and a few lots of alfalfa. I started 4 types of seeds today and also ordered more seeds from here

    http://www.organiccatalog.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=21_52
    • Loretta
    • By Loretta 20th Jan 06, 6:03 PM
    • 1,086 Posts
    • 1,131 Thanks
    Loretta
    I was so pleased to read this as I had planned doing this as my new project, they must be better - and cheaper- than bought ones. I was going to try any beans I already had and see what happens
    Loretta
    • Swan
    • By Swan 20th Jan 06, 8:27 PM
    • 6,633 Posts
    • 7,400 Thanks
    Swan
    Just a quick question, Do you grow the seeds in the dark or not?
    by Mr Proctalgia
    yes they grow in the dark. Just use whatever facility you have
    by kittie
    my favourite is alfalfa & I always sprout it in the dark till it's almost ready, then put it on the window ledge to green a little ... I have a vague recollection of hearing that letting it do that provides better nutrients, but I never investigated further so don't know if it's actually true

    can anyone shed any light on this? no pun intended
  • Queenie
    Swan, can't shed any light on the theory but I don't grow mine in the dark and enjoy perfect results

    kittie, took a look at the link, but to me the products look rather pricey
    Have you checked out your local health food stores? Certainly my local one is considerably cheaper than the seeds on the website - might be worth having a look locally?
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PMS Pot: 57.53 Pigsback Pot: 23.00
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    • Swan
    • By Swan 21st Jan 06, 10:48 AM
    • 6,633 Posts
    • 7,400 Thanks
    Swan
    Swan, can't shed any light on the theory but I don't grow mine in the dark and enjoy perfect results
    by Queenie
    I'll have to do a bit of Googling, it was a very long time ago (my memory's not what it was :rolleyes but as I recall it was something to do with the photosynthesis increasing one or some of the nutrients. but it could well be one of those spurious word of mouth things with no basis in fact

    I find that the greener it gets, the more bitter it gets. so I try to strike a balance so I don't lose that lovely sweet fresh pea flavour it has
    • tiddles
    • By tiddles 22nd Jan 06, 9:52 AM
    • 143 Posts
    • 628 Thanks
    tiddles
    Hi, I have just dug out my seed sprouting trays which I haven't used for about 10 years. I was inspired to do so by this thread, so thank you!

    I've lost the instructions, so if anyone else uses this method could you please tell me whether you soak the mung beans, etc first?

    Thanks.
    • Quasar
    • By Quasar 22nd Jan 06, 1:13 PM
    • 114,204 Posts
    • 235,126 Thanks
    Quasar
    I also sprout grains and pulses.

    At the moment I have going three lots of alfalfa at various stages of sprouting (so I get a daily ready supply), and also two lots of chickpeas.

    I often sprout mung beans but don't really like these a lot, so I let them grow into leaf until the two little leaves are about 1 inch long, cut them at the base and steam them as a cooked green, or add them raw to a salad. Makes a nice, unusual addition.

    In the past I have tried srpouting wheat but I find it gets far too sweet for me.

    Personally, I find sprouting seeds of all kinds to be the best way of ensuring a top quality source of raw enzimes, vitamin C and other natural goodies!

    I grow mine in the light so as much chlorophyll as possible is produced, which is very important for our health.

    I do not use a sprouter. I soak them according to their kind (some require longer than others), then I rinse them a couple of time a day and leave them on the windowsill until ready.

    Thanks to OP for starting this very useful thread!

    Last edited by Quasar; 22-01-2006 at 1:16 PM.
    Bread is like the sun: it rises in the yeast and sets in the waist.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,441Posts Today

7,902Users online

Martin's Twitter