Fidelity SIPP best equities fund?

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  • edited 16 October at 9:15AM
    SomeMadeUpNameSomeMadeUpName Forumite
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    edited 16 October at 9:15AM
    @Albermarle & @Linton thank you both for your input. Though tbh I'm so useless at this I'm not sure it didn't confuse me more.

    This enquiry is (like the OP) for my teenage daughter's Fidelity pension fund, it's 2 years old so has £7,200 in it, currently just sat in cash and ergo devaluing.  She will not be able to touch it for at least 40 years so performance (net of charges) is a higher priority than stability.  I will only pay in for her for 2 maybe 3 more years until she can have a LISA and can start to build that instead.

    My wife and I both also have equally small (as my daughter's) pensions, but with Vanguard. Won't draw on them for 20years and will keep paying in until then (75yrs old) but only slowly (non earner max, plus £70k over 20 years direct from Ltd Co into my wife's to balance the £70k I have in Phoenix opted out fund soon to be moved to Vanguard).

    Not sure the wife and I are in the ideal investments, but I'll park that for now as at least we are in something.

    I need to get my daughters out of cash, as that's just wasteful.  She can go risky (in the sense that volatility is no issue for at least the next 35 years).  

    Trouble is that whilst a few months of wandering around this forum has meant that now I consider myself pretty knowledgeable on pension contributions (limits, allowances, routes, etc) I am still utterly befuddled by investment choices.  Definitely want an invest and forget choice, and as my daughter is in Fidelity she has a much wider choice than we do in Vanguard.  

    Where do I start???  Obviously I do not want advice on what she/we should do, but I would be grateful for anyone's take on what they might hypothetically do if they were in her/our position.

    The only thing I would add is that as a family we are way too heavy in UK property.  That's all in my wife's or my name though, so whilst I will weigh that in when I get round to reviewing our choices, I'm not sure it has to be factored in when I consider my daughter's (as those investments will mainly have been cashed in for better or worse long before she will get to draw on her pension).

    Thx
  • AlbermarleAlbermarle Forumite
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    Normally for long term for young people , a simple global index tracker is recommended. The only thing to be careful of is that they are 100% equities so will be quite volatile at times . So if you , or your daughter are nervous types , then there might be a temptation to pull out when markets are dropping , which is the worst thing you can do .
    Earlier in the thread you will see these mentioned .
    Fidelity Index World - a fund with low charges - no emerging markets and high % in US
    HSBC All World fund - a fund with low charges - a % of emerging markets and less high in US
    Vanguard FTSE All world - similar to HSBC , but an ETF , not a fund . Higher charge but Fidelity have lower platform charges for ETF's than funds . However there are charges for one off purchase ( £10) or regular investing ( £1.50) 
  • MFW2026MFW2026 Forumite
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    @SomeMadeUpName Fidelity has the navigator tool, this is what i used. It lets you choose growth or income funds then your risk tolerance. This is how I opted for Fidelity Multi Asset Allocator Adventurous as recommended by their tool. 
    Nurse striving for financial freedom
  • MFW2026MFW2026 Forumite
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    The one thing that frustrates me with however with Fidelity is that if you want to change a fund or increase payments etc you cant do this online and have to send about 50 pages in the post.  :#
    Nurse striving for financial freedom
  • edited 16 October at 12:47PM
    LintonLinton Forumite
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    edited 16 October at 12:47PM
    If you dont want to withdraw money from the portfolio for 20+ years,m can accept volatility and have no wish to become an investment nerd I would agree with Albemarle that a global index fund would be sensible.  Such funds are available from a number of fund managers.  The difference between the funds can be summarised as
     - degree of globality
     - range of company sizes
     - cost

    Which one you choose will not make a life-changing difference.  Some people may go for the lowest charge.  I personally would choose the Vanguard FTSE Global All Cap Index fund which invests in the widest range of countries and the widest range of company sizes.
  • EdSwippetEdSwippet Forumite
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    dunstonh said:
    You will not get advice here.  Advice is regulated.  What you get here are discussion and opinion.   

    'In the context of financial services, “advice” is a service which recommends a specific course of action based on consumers’ individual circumstances and goals; ...'  source: Consumer explanation of 'advice' and 'guidance'. Prepared for HM Treasury and the Financial Conduct Authority, 2017.

    A moderated, anonymous internet forum is a 'financial service'. Discuss.

    From "How this site works" at the bottom of each and every forum page:
    This info does not constitute financial advice, always do your own research on top to ensure it's right for your specific circumstances ...
    A moderated, anonymous internet forum that might or might not be a 'financial service', but which explicitly states that it does not constitute advice, therefore does not constitute 'advice'. Discuss.

  • AlbermarleAlbermarle Forumite
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    MFW2026 said:
    The one thing that frustrates me with however with Fidelity is that if you want to change a fund or increase payments etc you cant do this online and have to send about 50 pages in the post.  :#
    I presume you mean if you want to change where regular payments go? 

    I had the same problem with Standard Life . I could switch funds on line but if I wanted to change where payments went , I had to speak to them and go through various warning scenarios.
  • mark13mark13 Forumite
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    Fidelity also have a select 50 based on the experts review, that would be 50 recommeded funds  That may be a good starting point. Also I would look at Interactive Investor who publish tables of the most bought funds/trusts/ETF's on their platform. Take that information and then use it to help you decide what to invest in. 
    Win Dec 2009 - In the Night Garden DVD : Nov 2010 - Paultons Park Tickets :
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