New kitchen quote

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  • MaarakaanMaarakaan Forumite
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    "It's not falling to bits" is about the nicest thing you can say about it. I respect people willing to put up with something like this they really dislike - we have done for close to 2 years - but have decided to change it in some way now. Everything else in the house is done, which means the kitchen sticks out like a sore thumb - meaning we both hate time spending in there/it ruins our enjoyment of the house as a whole in a way.

    I've not said we've got an issue with potentially doing bigger changes - however, I've not found any reliable info on things like this online which has so far deterred me from going down that route seriously as my (possibly misguided) image of the costs that come with it have put me off.

    PS: I don't think i've said anywhere I am going into debt?
  • GDB2222GDB2222 Forumite
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    I don’t think you need worry about the comments from me, and others, expressing surprise that you want to rip out the existing kitchen. You asked whether your quote is reasonable, and there’s been a bit of “mission creep”. :)
    No reliance should be placed on the above! Absolutely none, do you hear?
  • ratraceratrace Forumite
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    Maarakaan said:
    "It's not falling to bits" is about the nicest thing you can say about it. I respect people willing to put up with something like this they really dislike - we have done for close to 2 years - but have decided to change it in some way now. Everything else in the house is done, which means the kitchen sticks out like a sore thumb - meaning we both hate time spending in there/it ruins our enjoyment of the house as a whole in a way.

    I know what you mean i have lived with mine in the state its in for 10 years, i just give it a lick of paint every 2 years i would love to change it as its 20 years old but we want to pay the house of first

    I've not said we've got an issue with potentially doing bigger changes - however, I've not found any reliable info on things like this online which has so far deterred me from going down that route seriously as my (possibly misguided) image of the costs that come with it have put me off.
    yes its an expensive job there is no way around that,my brother just did an extenstion last year and it cost £45k and thats just the shell completed the whole job came in at £60k, he sold his rental house that he had to pay for it  

    PS: I don't think i've said anywhere I am going into debt?
    No you didnt but you did say its quite an expense for us , im not saying you should not do it but looking at it its looks fine to me, all the best with whatever you do
                                     

    People are caught up in an egotistic artificial rat race to display a false image to society. We want the biggest house, fanciest car, and we don't mind paying the sky high mortgage to put up that show. We sacrifice our biggest assets our health and time, We feel happy when we see people look up to us and see how successful we are”

    Rat Race
  • sadsack1sadsack1 Forumite
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    Take a look at kitchencollection.co.UK they do supply only kitchens but you can save loads of money.
  • edited 14 September at 7:26PM
    theonlywayisuptheonlywayisup Forumite
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    edited 14 September at 7:26PM
    I initially asked for the floorpan and whilst slightly helpful it isn't really helpful. Where are your doors on it and if you have measurements that will really help.

    Do you spend £X now and live with a newer version of the kitchen you have for x years or do you do it properly, perhaps a bit at a time and change the layout properly?  Don't rush, do it well.


  • MaarakaanMaarakaan Forumite
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    @GDB2222: I also took it to mean it's not worth it for what it is/provides me with so while there's a bit of mission creep it still answered my question I suppose. And I do appreciate ppl's takes on it - it's hard to know where to start and what steps to take a which time if you've never done it before. 

    (Possibly) fun fact: I'm originally from Germany and over there even in rental properties you would put in your own kitchen (and most ppl would DIY it) and then take it with you again when you move out. The result is my parents have had their kitchen for longer than I'm alive and can't be much of a help on my little potential project. 

    @ratrace eeeeee 60k. Now that'd require going into debt for. "being an adult" at times just feels like picking the least bad option - live with a kitchen you don't like or feel like you're spending frivolously for not overpaying on mortgage. 

    @sadsack1 - will have a look, thanks! Have been playing around with the kitchenplanner from IKEA as well to get a feel for what types of cabinets etc I'd need and it's more intuitive than I thought. 

    @theonlywayisup - apologies that reply yday was a quick paint-job while dodging work. Got some measurements for my IKEA inspiration trip yesterday so will turn that into something legible and post. 

    Is this something that you can do bit by bit? E.g. do the existing utility area next to the boiler first, then extend into garage, then replace the kitchen area?
    Do kitchen ranges stay around for long enough that you don't run the risk of your colours/styles being discontinued?

    It's a good idea as it would show us we're making progress, and therefore make dealing with the existing kitchen more palatable with having the added benefit of no buyers remorse down the line 

    Thanks all!
  • Rosa_DamascenaRosa_Damascena Forumite
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    Maarakaan said:

    (Possibly) fun fact: I'm originally from Germany and over there even in rental properties you would put in your own kitchen (and most ppl would DIY it) and then take it with you again when you move out. The result is my parents have had their kitchen for longer than I'm alive and can't be much of a help on my little potential project. 

    I knew about Germany as a nation of renters, but not this! People taking care of their rental properties in this way is an investment that is rare in the UK.
    No man is worth crawling on this earth.

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  • MaarakaanMaarakaan Forumite
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    Not sure if it's standard practice, but one place we moved into had only screed floors in some places, no coverings.
    My dad worked for a carpet import company at the time, and put some carpet in himself - when moving out the landlord offered to buy them off us to keep them in there and make the place more ready for the next ppl. Makes it feel like a bit more of a symbiotic relationship rather than what's seem bit more confrontational at times over here. Though I'm sure there are examples of that as well.

    Back on topic (which has shifted a wee bit):
    Rosa, if I remember correctly - apologies if wrong - you have advocated for DIY kitchens in the past (someone definitely has on previous threads). 
    I've looked at their website and it looks v nice and comparatively low fuss as it's not flatpack - esp. a fan of choosing different carcass colours rather than standard white only. 
    From experience, are they good value for money?
    Is it advisable to just buy units from there and appliances/worktops separately or is it much the same?
    How do you go about sense-checking what you've come up with on there? Would a joiner/kitchen fitter be amenable to looking through a design/list of cabinets and advise (obvs be compensated for their time)? 

    If i come up with something sensible from there the other half might Ok hanging on for a while longer and exploring converting part of the garage.

    Thanks!

  • ka7eka7e Forumite
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    It's me that has the DIY kitchen (Luca) and it was a lot cheaper than other quotes I had (Magnet, Wickes, Benchmarx). The doors were very solid and I wanted a kitchen that wasn't white or grey! I have Dakar carcasses which look really smart. I have drawers concealed in tall units, lots of pan drawers and a pull-out larder which I couldn't have afforded from other suppliers. Their online kitchen planner was a bit quirky, but advised you of door clashes/ obstructions etc and automatically added end panels and trim. It also gave me a 3d rendition of the finished plan.
    I bought my appliances online as "graded", so cosmetically imperfect but that just means tiny dings where they're not visible. Worktops were cheapest online, but even then, supply chains were dodgy.

    "Cheap", "Fast", "Right" -- pick two.
  • Racky_RooRacky_Roo Forumite
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    I think the reason the quote is high is because you're paying for the convenience of someone managing all the trades for you but by the sounds of it, it's not particularly difficult what you want and I would expect you could find a handyman who could do all that for you from checkatrade anyway which would most likely work out cheaper. I also think Ikea offer all the trades for you if you buy the kitchen etc from them so worth asking when you pop in
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