Fidelity SIPP best equities fund?

I am planning to start my pension in Fidelity SIPP.  Can you please advise best equities funds in  Fidelity ?
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  • edited 9 June 2021 at 7:41PM
    bostonerimusbostonerimus Forumite
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    edited 9 June 2021 at 7:41PM
    How long is a piece of string? What do you want to achieve? Anyway it's sort of the wrong question. You should be asking what funds are well suited to my goals. There will be many potential funds and portfolios that you can choose. There is no "best fund".
    “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
  • everfor007everfor007 Forumite
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    i am 40 years old, going to hold off for next 15 to 20 years,  i am happy to take high risk.  In fidelity, it has so many equities funds, so i am asking help here. Appreciate your advise.. 
  • dunstonhdunstonh Forumite
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    Can you please advise best equities funds in  Fidelity ?

    WIth a SIPP, you can invest in around 30,000 options.   What makes you think there is a best fund(s)?

     am happy to take high risk.  

    What do you mean by high risk?  One person's low risk is another person's high risk.  We need some context.   How much are you willing to accept it going down in a 12 month period for example?

    In fidelity, it has so many equities funds, so i am asking help here. Appreciate your advise.. 

    You will not get advice here.  Advice is regulated.  What you get here are discussion and opinion.   Some people will be knowledgeable.  Others less so and some will be disruptive and post rubbish.   Also, investing has a heavy dose of opinion.    If you asked 100 different people to build a portfolio you would get 100 different portfolios.   There may be an odd overlap with some funds or investments but no one would have the same.  

    SIPPs are the advanced option.   Not really suitable for someone who needs to rely on people on the internet telling them what to invest in.   Have you considered alternative options that are not quite as advanced?


    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). The comments I make are just my opinion and are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice and you should not treat them as such. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
  • NedSNedS Forumite
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    Definitely not advice, but if you were looking for a diversified global equity index tracker, the Fidelity Index World fund which tracks the MSCI World Index seems a popular choice.
  • Knock_RockKnock_Rock Forumite
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    +1 Fidelity Index World for equity 15 yrs plus if you want 100% equity exposure, nice low % fees. You will get your share of the world's pie... If you want more than your share, good look. (sic)
    Depends on how much time you are willing to invest. & that is something you can't buy....
    No advice, only retrospect opinion.. :)




  • bostonerimusbostonerimus Forumite
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    Here is a link with some useful information. I think you should look at multi-asset funds with a fairly high percentage of worldwide equities.
    https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Investing_from_the_UK#Sample_portfolios
    “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
  • AlbermarleAlbermarle Forumite
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    NedS said:
    Definitely not advice, but if you were looking for a diversified global equity index tracker, the Fidelity Index World fund which tracks the MSCI World Index seems a popular choice.
    Or you could look at the similar HSBC all world index fund that tracks the FTSE all world index or Vanguard FTSE all world ETF ( with the charging structure of Fidelity can be advantageous to hold ETF rather than a fund .
    In theory 100% index funds are a good choice for a younger long term investor , but over the period of investment you could see some big sudden drops which can be scary for those of a more nervous disposition.
  • NedS said:
    Definitely not advice, but if you were looking for a diversified global equity index tracker, the Fidelity Index World fund which tracks the MSCI World Index seems a popular choice.
    Or you could look at the similar HSBC all world index fund that tracks the FTSE all world index or Vanguard FTSE all world ETF ( with the charging structure of Fidelity can be advantageous to hold ETF rather than a fund .
    In theory 100% index funds are a good choice for a younger long term investor , but over the period of investment you could see some big sudden drops which can be scary for those of a more nervous disposition.
    @Albermarle, hi, I'm guessing EFT stands for something like equity tracker fund?  What is the difference between that and a fund, and why do you suggest the Fidelity charge structure favours an EFT? 

    I'm looking to invest the funds my daughter has in her Fidelity SIPP, which she won't be accessing for 40-50 years, as she's still a young teenager.
  • george_jetsongeorge_jetson Forumite
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    NedS said:
    Definitely not advice, but if you were looking for a diversified global equity index tracker, the Fidelity Index World fund which tracks the MSCI World Index seems a popular choice.
    Or you could look at the similar HSBC all world index fund that tracks the FTSE all world index or Vanguard FTSE all world ETF ( with the charging structure of Fidelity can be advantageous to hold ETF rather than a fund .
    In theory 100% index funds are a good choice for a younger long term investor , but over the period of investment you could see some big sudden drops which can be scary for those of a more nervous disposition.
    @Albermarle, hi, I'm guessing EFT stands for something like equity tracker fund?  What is the difference between that and a fund, and why do you suggest the Fidelity charge structure favours an EFT? 

    I'm looking to invest the funds my daughter has in her Fidelity SIPP, which she won't be accessing for 40-50 years, as she's still a young teenager.
    Exchange traded fund
    MFW Challenge: Mortgage free in 2008! ACHIEVED! :D
  • AlbermarleAlbermarle Forumite
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    You can track an index by using an index tracker fund ( an OEIC in the jargon ) or an index tracker Exchange traded Fund .
    Probably best you google if you want the details . Largely the end result should be the same for the long term investor .
    Differences in charging structures with different investment platforms can mean with some it works out cheaper using funds, but with Fidelity it is cheaper to use a ETF tracker .
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