Soil pipe partial replacement

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  • edited 30 March at 11:13PM
    grumblergrumbler Forumite
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    edited 30 March at 11:13PM
    Yes, solvent-weld means glued with solvent-based glue/cement.
    Solvent weld waste pipe system How to glue waste pipes  flo plast -  YouTube
    these pipes are smaller, but the process is the same.
    We are born naked, wet and hungry...Then things get worse. :(

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  • Jeepers_CreepersJeepers_Creepers Forumite
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    gboy25 said:
    grumbler said:
    Can you take a close-up photo of the part that's actually leaking? Is the pipe actually cracked?
    The picture actually isn't that bad if you zoom it.
    It's solvent-weld branch with two sockets - at the top and at the bottom. Looks like the bottom joint is typically leaking and somebody already tried to fix this with some sort of black sealant.

    When you say solvent-weld branch - what does that mean exactly please? I assume the white marks are dirt and the black sealant is seen just below that? 
    The plumber said about "bad gluing" so maybe that's what he was referring to.


    The white marks could well have been an earlier attempt to sort the leak using solvent cement - it can be messy stuff.
    Really, the joint would need redoing properly before the solvent weld can have its effect, but these pipes are at zero water pressure and just need to not have 'leaks' in them. So there's a fair chance that cleaning up the outside and then wiping a generous amount of the solvent adhesive around where the lower pipe goes into the upper branch fitting will seal it.
    Solvent 'weld' is what it says - a 'solvent' - ie it dissolves the plastic. It also has some 'body' to it, so leaves a coating too, which helps. By wiping it all around that joint - when it's bone-dry - it should 'melt' the pipe onto the fitting, just about enough to seal it.
    Whether you are up for a bit of DIY is another matter.
  • danrvdanrv Forumite
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    Solvent weld branch is the connecting part there that links the two pipes. 
    Branch meaning it has outlets for other connections and solvent weld means cement is used for a permanent join.
    Hopefully it can just be remade if the lower pipe can be separated .
  • edited 30 March at 11:47PM
    Jeepers_CreepersJeepers_Creepers Forumite
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    edited 30 March at 11:47PM
    These soil pipes and fittings basically come in two types - 'push-fit' which has rubber O-rings inside them to make the seal (they are literally pushed together, and can be dismantled easily too) and 'solvent-weld' which don't have any O-rings, but the pipe is a snug fit inside the fitting. Before final assembly, the pipe end and the inside of the fitting is given a nice coating of 'solvent adhesive' which instantly begins to 'melt' the surface of each. When the pipe is pushed in, the melted surfaces amalgamate and stay 'welded' when the solvent evaporates away. You cannot then dismantle it.
    Solvent fittings are therefore 'permanent', cheaper and slimmer. They are great - when done properly. The drawback is as you've found - if it hasn't been done properly, then you usually need to replace them.
    I suspect the white marks are previous attempts at using solvent - it looks like the typical smears left by careless application - the black pipe surface has been 'melted'. In which case, it does look as tho' replacement is the only option.
    Your quote ain't criminal, but it is a straight-forward job, so worth getting another quote of you like tobersure tobesure.
  • gboy25gboy25 Forumite
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    These soil pipes and fittings basically come in two types - 'push-fit' which has rubber O-rings inside them to make the seal (they are literally pushed together, and can be dismantled easily too) and 'solvent-weld' which don't have any O-rings, but the pipe is a snug fit inside the fitting. Before final assembly, the pipe end and the inside of the fitting is given a nice coating of 'solvent adhesive' which instantly begins to 'melt' the surface of each. When the pipe is pushed in, the melted surfaces amalgamate and stay 'welded' when the solvent evaporates away. You cannot then dismantle it.
    Solvent fittings are therefore 'permanent', cheaper and slimmer. They are great - when done properly. The drawback is as you've found - if it hasn't been done properly, then you usually need to replace them.
    I suspect the white marks are previous attempts at using solvent - it looks like the typical smears left by careless application - the black pipe surface has been 'melted'. In which case, it does look as tho' replacement is the only option.
    Your quote ain't criminal, but it is a straight-forward job, so worth getting another quote of you like tobersure tobesure.
    Thank you very much for explaining that. I think that was the point the plumber was trying to make but he wasnt very clear. I will get another quote and go from there. 
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