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Bookworms 2020

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Old Style MoneySaving
419 replies 33.5K views
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  • Skibunny40Skibunny40 Forumite
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    Just found this thread - perfect for these times where I'm getting through books at a rate of knots ( and being so grateful for my Kindle!) I've downloaded lots of free samples of recommendations on here to give me tasters. I notice a few people here are Susan Hill fans - I'd highly recommend her non fiction book "Howard's End is on the Landing" which describes all her favourite books, and is a much better read than I've just made it sound!
  • dolly84dolly84 Forumite
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    dolly84 said:
    Have finished 'Of Mice and Men', this is one of the 100 books to read before you die, it is a quick and easy read but in all honesty I don't see what all the fuss is about, I just wanted someone to throttle Lennie all the way through.  Grapes of Wrath is on the list too, hope that is better.

    Charly - I know what you mean about hunting, I am vegan and I know that choosing to do that is a luxury, I don't disagree with hunting for survival and know if push came to shove I would do it, I have mixed feelings about eating animals and animal products, on the one hand I think who the bliddy hell do we think we are and on the other I know that so many people rely on the industry for their livelihood, I am a realist I suppose, we should be doing it better and not to excess.

    😲. Of Mice and Men is wonderful. The language, the structure and, of course, the relationships.  I'm sure other people would have wanted to throttle Lennie, with his learning difficulties, but George cared for him. And their dream kept them going in the Depression.  That's the point. 
    I've had pupils cry during the reading of the last chapter. 

    Cry, really?  I know it is beloved of teachers because of the relationships and asking students to dissect them but outside of that environment it isn't all that imo. 
    Debt Free and now a saver, conscious consumer, low waste lifestyler


    Fashion on the Ration 18/66
  • edited 4 June at 8:29AM
    pollypennypollypenny Forumite
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    edited 4 June at 8:29AM
    dolly84 said:
    dolly84 said:
    Have finished 'Of Mice and Men', this is one of the 100 books to read before you die, it is a quick and easy read but in all honesty I don't see what all the fuss is about, I just wanted someone to throttle Lennie all the way through.  Grapes of Wrath is on the list too, hope that is better.

    Charly - I know what you mean about hunting, I am vegan and I know that choosing to do that is a luxury, I don't disagree with hunting for survival and know if push came to shove I would do it, I have mixed feelings about eating animals and animal products, on the one hand I think who the bliddy hell do we think we are and on the other I know that so many people rely on the industry for their livelihood, I am a realist I suppose, we should be doing it better and not to excess.

    😲. Of Mice and Men is wonderful. The language, the structure and, of course, the relationships.  I'm sure other people would have wanted to throttle Lennie, with his learning difficulties, but George cared for him. And their dream kept them going in the Depression.  That's the point. 
    I've had pupils cry during the reading of the last chapter. 

    Cry, really?  I know it is beloved of teachers because of the relationships and asking students to dissect them but outside of that environment it isn't all that imo. 


    No.  It is beloved of teachers because of the language mainly.  It's a novel which allows pupils of all ability shine. The less able appreciate the relationships and the context, as some of them will have been treated harshly. Kids have a clear sense of fairness.  The brightest pupils can really get into analysis of both language and structure  

    I don't know how anyone can fail to find those closing pages to be very moving. 
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
  • Ditzy_MitzyDitzy_Mitzy Forumite
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    dolly84 said:
    dolly84 said:
    Have finished 'Of Mice and Men', this is one of the 100 books to read before you die, it is a quick and easy read but in all honesty I don't see what all the fuss is about, I just wanted someone to throttle Lennie all the way through.  Grapes of Wrath is on the list too, hope that is better.

    Charly - I know what you mean about hunting, I am vegan and I know that choosing to do that is a luxury, I don't disagree with hunting for survival and know if push came to shove I would do it, I have mixed feelings about eating animals and animal products, on the one hand I think who the bliddy hell do we think we are and on the other I know that so many people rely on the industry for their livelihood, I am a realist I suppose, we should be doing it better and not to excess.

    😲. Of Mice and Men is wonderful. The language, the structure and, of course, the relationships.  I'm sure other people would have wanted to throttle Lennie, with his learning difficulties, but George cared for him. And their dream kept them going in the Depression.  That's the point. 
    I've had pupils cry during the reading of the last chapter. 

    Cry, really?  I know it is beloved of teachers because of the relationships and asking students to dissect them but outside of that environment it isn't all that imo. 
    I've often thought the same about 'The Catcher in the Rye' - it's all right but no towering work of genius.  True believers, however, seem to think it's the best thing ever written.  Maybe we're missing something?  I preferred 'Of Mice and Men', but wouldn't say it was a favourite.
  • edited 4 June at 10:11AM
    HappycasHappycas Forumite
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    edited 4 June at 10:11AM
    I think Of Mice and Men is much like Animal Farm.  Appears to be a simple story, but actually has so many layers if looked at more closely, which is why it is ' beloved of teachers'. It is an introduction to literature which can be appreciated on many levels.
    Grapes of Wrath is much more open about what it is, and more openly political, and more linked to a particular time (but could soon be very relevant again!) But still makes me cry at the end!

    Catcher in the Rye - nah, not my cup of tea !
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  • dolly84dolly84 Forumite
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    Happycas said:
    I think Of Mice and Men is much like Animal Farm.  Appears to be a simple story, but actually has so many layers if looked at more closely, which is why it is ' beloved of teachers'. It is an introduction to literature which can be appreciated on many levels.
    Grapes of Wrath is much more open about what it is, and more openly political, and more linked to a particular time (but could soon be very relevant again!) But still makes me cry at the end!

    Catcher in the Rye - nah, not my cup of tea !

    Now Animal Farm I did really enjoy, I thought it was very clever.  The layers in Of Mice and Men is not lost on me I think it is probably one of those situations with me where something is much revered by so many that when it turns out to not be life changing it is disappointing, the only character I found interesting was Crooks.
    Debt Free and now a saver, conscious consumer, low waste lifestyler


    Fashion on the Ration 18/66
  • HappycasHappycas Forumite
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    I know what you mean about revered books turning out to be disappointing.  Bit like me and Great Gatsby or Catcher in the Rye. It's almost ' Emperor's New Clothes' in reverse. I feel I am missing something that everyone else can see!
  • Charly27Charly27 Forumite
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    Just finished by The Shores of Silver Lake. Laura’s first glimpse of her future husband
     (well his horses anyway). Just started a Maeve Binchy ‘Evening Class’ which was one of the last books I had picked up in a charity shop before lock down. 
    I have to wait for more stories from the prairie to arrive in the post but I think Maeve will help. I’ve enjoyed several of her books in the past. I think she’s a great storyteller. 
    Sorry if I’ve lowered the tone 🤣
    Proud to be dealing with my debts! DF Nerd # 1475
    Books read in 2020 45/50
    Currently reading ‘Me and White Supremacy’ Layla Saad.
    #20 in 2020 5/20
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  • gettingtheresometimegettingtheresometime Forumite
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    I remember reading Mice & Men only because my son was doing it for GCSE & we'd talk about it as we washed the dishes every evening.


    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott / Argos Card / JD Williams cleared :) thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge
  • HappycasHappycas Forumite
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    Charly
    I think I read Evening Class years ago.  Are they learning Italian?  In my 'rereading well loved authors and feeling safe' mode for coping with  lockdown etc, I think it's time to revisit Maeve Binchy.

    Thanks for the reminder!
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