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Purchased house and found out next door is a children’s home

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in House Buying, Renting & Selling
25 replies 3.2K views
2

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  • hazyjohazyjo Forumite
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    Is there absolutely no signage outside it at all? Nothing?


    Did you ask the vendors 'what are the neighbours like?' or any other questions about them? Even if you didn't knock on doors, you may at least have some sort of comeback if the sellers actually lied about who was there.
    2020 wins: nada (yet)
  • gingerdadgingerdad Forumite
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    All I can ask is how much research did you do before buying - cause I can tell you all the planning applications when purchased, any businesses registered to addresses, any company directors, the CQC rating of a care home nearby..... I don't understand how it seems you didn't even google the postcode - cause that would have brought up all sorts.

    But as other posters have said the previous owners only needed to disclose if there was a dispute, which if you have one you'll need to disclose going forward.

    good luck
    The futures bright the future is Ginger
  • G_MG_M PPR Forumite
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    So what happened when you knocked on the neighbours' door before making your final decision? Seem unlikely there was noone in. And if so, surely you tried more than once?

    What about he neighbours the other side? Did they not mention it?

    I know this is not helpful now, but for the benefit of other buyers reading this, always check with the neighbours!

    * if they slam the door in your face, you've learned a huge lesson
    * if they mention the sellers have had constant roof problems, that's really useful
    * if they invite you in and tell you all about the street community spirit, offer you cake and tea and quiz you about your jobs/family/etc - well you might consider that a plus or a minus, but either way it's useful!


    You're not just buying a house - you're buying a life in a street/area.
    ** If I include a blue link in my post, click and read it before posting a follow-up question. The answer may be in the link! **
  • phill99phill99 Forumite
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    Another purchaser failing to do basic due diligence and then looking to blame someone else.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
  • couriervanmancouriervanman Forumite
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    cg212 wrote: »
    Hi, I am posting to see if anybody can share some advice on the following matter.

    I have recently purchased a house (3 weeks ago) and we have had a few issues with noise (arguing and loud music mainly). However, upon asking the neighbours to turn the music down on a couple of occasions, we learnt that next door is children’s support accommodation for 16-18 year olds. They have adults which work in shifts to go in there to look after them. However, had we known this prior to now, we wouldn’t have purchased the house.

    Should the sellers have been legally obliged to tell us? Should it have been discovered when the solicitor carried out our searches.

    Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

    OP.......I think the blame firmly stops with you,i cant believe you didn't have a nose around before you bought
  • edited 21 October 2019 at 4:15PM
    need_an_answerneed_an_answer Forumite
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    edited 21 October 2019 at 4:15PM
    To a point I do sympathise with the OP, Yes perhaps you should have knocked on a few doors before you bought or spoke to neighbours,but not everybody does do that.

    ...and no there doesn't even need to be any signage outside that could alert you either.

    I'm a LL and have 2 properties within a complex where recently a home for independent living young adults with some issues have recently rented a property.....its been challenging for everyone to say the least!

    They moved in around a year ago and since then it has been a what seems like an uphill struggle for all the nearby residents to live in harmony with these young adults...yes they are to some extent supervised during the day but come clocking off time the place can be so easily transformed and often the police are called to mediate.

    From memory we are now on about the 5th set of tenants and touch wood there have been no problems for several weeks.

    OP I would suggest you do try and find out what the set up with the home is,whether it is owned by a business or just on a long term rental.
    Hard as it may seem try and speak with those in charge and take it further up the line if you have to.
    Log your concerns and if appropriate try and speak to other neighbours to see if they are disturbed by the noise or whatever and collectively you may be able to get some assurances that the unsociable instances are stopped

    Collectively myself and some other residents spoke with the charity who were living near us,and whilst its not resolved by any means there have been clear objectives and dare I say rules agreed that hopefully should allow everyone to be a little more understanding of eachother.

    These types of accommodations are becoming more frequently found in the community.I actually lived next door to one for many years with no problems whatsoever...three young guys who were wonderful. It all boils down to the individual residents.
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  • davidmcndavidmcn Forumite
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    Living next to teenagers you are going to get occasional shouting matches, a bit of drum & bass and door slamming regardless of whether a childrens home or not!
    Indeed, though with a normal household you'd at least be confident that the teens will at some point mature and/or move out - whereas with a children's home it's a "household" which mostly comprises teens, and always will.
  • couriervanmancouriervanman Forumite
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    To a point I do sympathise with the OP, Yes perhaps you should have knocked on a few doors before you bought or spoke to neighbours,but not everybody does do that.

    ...and no there doesn't even need to be any signage outside that could alert you either.

    I'm a LL and have 2 properties within a complex where recently a home for independent living young adults with some issues have recently rented a property.....its been challenging for everyone to say the least!

    They moved in around a year ago and since then it has been a what seems like an uphill struggle for all the nearby residents to live in harmony with these young adults...yes they are to some extent supervised during the day but come clocking off time the place can be so easily transformed and often the police are called to mediate.

    From memory we are now on about the 5th set of tenants and touch wood there have been no problems for several weeks.

    OP I would suggest you do try and find out what the set up with the home is,whether it is owned by a business or just on a long term rental.
    Hard as it may seem try and speak with those in charge and take it further up the line if you have to.

    Collectively myself and some other residents spoke with the charity who were living near us,and whilst its not resolved by any means there have been clear objectives and dare I say rules agreed that hopefully should allow everyone to be a little more understanding of eachother.

    "To a point I do sympathise with the OP, Yes perhaps you should have knocked on a few doors before you bought or spoke to neighbours,but not everybody does do that."


    If I'm spending £100k-£500k on a house.....I'd want to know the ins and out of a fart
  • edited 21 October 2019 at 3:56PM
    need_an_answerneed_an_answer Forumite
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    edited 21 October 2019 at 3:56PM
    "To a point I do sympathise with the OP, Yes perhaps you should have knocked on a few doors before you bought or spoke to neighbours,but not everybody does do that."


    If I'm spending £100k-£500k on a house.....I'd want to know the ins and out of a fart

    of course you do...but not everyone is quite as forward....

    I took very reasonable steps when purchasing both the properties that became affected by unsociable near neighbours...

    Sometimes the problem arrives after you purchase in the form of them just signing a rental agreement as I discovered...and sometimes the problem can be very well managed in daylight hours so those viewing and purchasing the property next door may not be aware.

    If youre quite so forensic with your "fart" then maybe even buying with anything nearby might be considered risky.....in as much as you'd probably be better off with your own company in a detached away from anyone

    Personally I'm not that keen when theres a large van on the drive...but I guess everyones different and has there own set of wants and compromises.
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  • elsienelsien Forumite
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    hazyjo wrote: »
    Is there absolutely no signage outside it at all? Nothing?


    Did you ask the vendors 'what are the neighbours like?' or any other questions about them? Even if you didn't knock on doors, you may at least have some sort of comeback if the sellers actually lied about who was there.

    It is possible given the age of the children that the property is more a supported living setting rather than a registered children's home.

    If this is the case then there wouldn't be any easy way to find out anything about the place through official channels. The address wouldn't be registered with CQC - the provider would be but if it's domiciliary it would be the providers office address, that's all, and it probably wouldn't need planning permission.
    So being there at different times and talking to neighbours would be the only way to find out it differed from a family home.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
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