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Breach of Data?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Consumer Rights
9 replies 780 views
lovingtescoforeverlovingtescoforever Forumite
3.4K posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Consumer Rights
Hello All,

I have a parcel sent via UPS and I noticed it had my personal mobile number on it. Never noticed this before?

Anyway it got me thinking that as I had to pick the parcel up as I was away. The parcel was left in a local corner shop for me to pick up. It was accessible by anyone who was shopping pretty much. They could see all my data. Full Name/ Mobile Number/Address.

With the new rules on stricter banking coming in force in the near future where our mobile phones will be contacted to approve online shopping etc.. surely that’s a risk of fraud of some sort with having our personal data of our mobile numbers so casually visible?

I could go into my corner shop and snap away pictures of parcels with peoples personal data on...

Replies

  • Gary123456790Gary123456790 Forumite
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    How would knowing someone's mobile phone number help you to commit bank fraud? If you're concerned about it, then don't order parcels but really please don't worry about it.

    Someone knowing your phone number is not a data breach, you might know my phone number but if the bank want me to authorise something they will either call me or ask me to authorise it in the app... neither of which you can do with my phone number.
  • gettingtheresometimegettingtheresometime Forumite
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    I thought that if you bought something on line then a code would be sent to the registered telephone number to authorise the payment

    Therefore if I've bought something using my card but put, an example, my husband's telephone number as the contact number then the authorisation code would be sent to his number. If I didn't put this code I'm assuming the purchase couldn't complete.
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott / Argos Card / JD Williams cleared :) thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge
  • unholyangelunholyangel Forumite
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    Strictly speaking, data protection laws don't require an actual loss to be suffered for there to be have been a breach and keeping personal data secure is a fundamental part of the data protection principles.

    I'd certainly raise a complaint with the retailer about it, assuming it was goods you had purchased. As the retailer will be the party you entered a contract with, the company who obtained your data and who then disclosed that data to their agent who has then potentially caused a breach by failing to take reasonable care.
    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means - Inigo Montoya, The Princess Bride
  • unforeseenunforeseen Forumite
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    OMG! think of all the numbers that the UPS driver has seen?

    If you want to chase somebody, take it up with the corner shop for leaving all these myriad of parcels with everybodies number on show.

    It is obviously something that the UPS driver might need, hence its reason to be on the label.
  • unforeseenunforeseen Forumite
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    the company who obtained your data and who then disclosed that data to their agent who has then potentially caused a breach by failing to take reasonable care.
    The corner shop is the party that failed to take reasonable care.

    UPS have drop off places the same way that Amazon do (where do you think Amazon got the idea from to use local post offices?)
  • unholyangelunholyangel Forumite
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    unforeseen wrote: »
    The corner shop is the party that failed to take reasonable care.

    UPS have drop off places the same way that Amazon do (where do you think Amazon got the idea from to use local post offices?)

    I know all of that, but they're still an agent/third party who has only came into possession of OP's data due to a disclosure of the retailers.
    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means - Inigo Montoya, The Princess Bride
  • born_againborn_again Forumite
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    Don't get where fraud from phone number comes from?
    They would need the card number and to either get hold of the phone or manage to get through phone co security to get a new sim sent to their address.
    Before being able to defeat the new online purchase process.
    On my way to retirement. Thanks to Covid 19. 
  • davidmcndavidmcn Forumite
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    born_again wrote: »
    Don't get where fraud from phone number comes from?
    They would need the card number and to either get hold of the phone or manage to get through phone co security to get a new sim sent to their address.
    There have been frauds involving replacement SIM cards being issued at the mobile networks' shops - though they are meant to get further ID from you for that to happen.
  • sherambersheramber Forumite
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    I thought that if you bought something on line then a code would be sent to the registered telephone number to authorise the payment

    Therefore if I've bought something using my card but put, an example, my husband's telephone number as the contact number then the authorisation code would be sent to his number. If I didn't put this code I'm assuming the purchase couldn't complete.

    The authorisation code is sent to the phone number that is registered on the bank account.

    The retailer does not see this number. It is sent by the bank to the that registered number.

    The retailer may ask for a mobile number so the courier can contact you if there is a problem with delivery. You give the mobile number that would be used for that. It may or may not be the same number. The retailer won't know or care.

    The only person who sees the authorisation code is whoever is making the purchase.
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