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Connecting to mains drainage

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JennyPJennyP Forumite
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My mum's house is on a septic tank and we know it doesn't confirm to the new regulations.

We've got a quote to get it changed already but it's quite high. I was wondering how to find out if it's possible to pay instead to get it connected to mains drainage. The neighbours on one side are connected so we know the mains must be tantalisingly near.

Does anyone please know who we'd ask?

Replies

  • edited 11 September 2019 at 12:36PM
    Ant555Ant555 Forumite
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    edited 11 September 2019 at 12:36PM
    It seems step 1 is to apply to the local water authority.

    My local authority is North West Water and a quick internet search for "north west water connect to sewer" brought this application form (link below) - replace the search term with your local water board name and it might bring up similar.

    https://www.unitedutilities.com/globalassets/documents/sewer-connection-application-part1.docx

    Here is a similar link to Anglian Water - looks like a good guide for a developer but you may pick up a feel for the process (even though it may not be your local authority)
    https://www.anglianwater.co.uk/developers/drainage-services/connect-to-sewer-network/

    There do appear to be companies offering their services to manage the whole process

    hope this helps
  • JennyPJennyP Forumite
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    Thank you.
    I thought it was through the local water company - United Utilities for my mum - but then someone told me that you had to hire a civil engineer yourself so I got confused!
  • snowcat75snowcat75 Forumite
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    Be warned nearly all utility's having the monopoly and being hopelessly inefficient, tend to be eye wateringly costly UNLESS there looking to incentivised ie they want mains sewage because its a catchment area etc etc.


    Iv put a few packaged treatment plants in and I'm amazed at the quotes people are getting, of course things like access etc tend to bump the cost up, but its worth getting a few prices.
  • JennyPJennyP Forumite
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    I contacted United Utilities and they said that I had to get a drainage contractor to look at whether it's possible. They can't tell me if it is or not. So I guess the person who said about getting a civil engineer was sort of right. If you then go ahead, you fill in the forms for the utility company.

    Snowcat75, could you please give me an idea of eye-wateringly costly? I know it will vary from place to place according to where the nearest mains drains actually is. I doubt it can be more than 50 metres away as the neighbours are on the mains.

    I know what the new septic tank will cost - around £10K - so if it's likely to be more than that, we will just go ahead and do the tank. I'm sure years ago, I looked into this for my parents and it was actually really cheap and easy than to connect to mains drainage but I couldn't persuade them - too much upheaval. Regretting it now!
  • BelenusBelenus Forumite
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    JennyP wrote: »
    My mum's house is on a septic tank and we know it doesn't confirm to the new regulations.....

    Are the new regulations retrospective? In other words must your Mum replace the tank?

    If it is working properly why replace it if you don't have to.
    Humans are the only creatures on Earth that will cut down a Tree,
    turn it into paper, and then write 'Save The Trees' on it.
  • JennyPJennyP Forumite
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    Belenus wrote: »
    Are the new regulations retrospective? In other words must your Mum replace the tank?

    If it is working properly why replace it if you don't have to.

    From 2020, the regulations change and I think all tanks must be changed if they don't comply. It doesn't. I've had it checked.
  • Carrot007Carrot007 Forumite
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    JennyP wrote: »
    I doubt it can be more than 50 metres away as the neighbours are on the mains.

    I know what the new septic tank will cost - around £10K


    In your property you could do the work yourself (dig, place pipe, easy!). But outside on "councIl" or on other people properties is going to be permits, survey, this and that and the other.


    New septic tank will be cheaper unless there are other houses wantingg to do the same to share the cost.
  • JennyPJennyP Forumite
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    Carrot007 wrote: »


    New septic tank will be cheaper unless there are other houses wantingg to do the same to share the cost.

    New tank is about £10K.

    I don't know if the neighbours want to connect up - I've asked my mum to find out.

    If you really think the tank will be cheaper, I'm almost inclined to just go for that. The drainage company I've contacted have asked me loads of technical questions that I can't answer and don't know how to find out the answers for like the depth of the nearest sewage pipe.

    Sometimes things feel like soooooo much hassle!
  • tonyh66tonyh66 Forumite
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    Do you know where the main sewer pipe is? it normally runs along the road and has manhole covers.
    you can then estimate the length of drain you need. If the drainage company is asking for the invert level of the main sewer then they are not the company you want to deal with. You need to get one out to look and ask them to quote.
  • snowcat75snowcat75 Forumite
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    JennyP wrote: »
    I contacted United Utilities and they said that I had to get a drainage contractor to look at whether it's possible. They can't tell me if it is or not. So I guess the person who said about getting a civil engineer was sort of right. If you then go ahead, you fill in the forms for the utility company.

    Snowcat75, could you please give me an idea of eye-wateringly costly? I know it will vary from place to place according to where the nearest mains drains actually is. I doubt it can be more than 50 metres away as the neighbours are on the mains.

    I know what the new septic tank will cost - around £10K - so if it's likely to be more than that, we will just go ahead and do the tank. I'm sure years ago, I looked into this for my parents and it was actually really cheap and easy than to connect to mains drainage but I couldn't persuade them - too much upheaval. Regretting it now!

    Utility's will charge on which way the wind is blowing but seam to start a five figures.

    This week Iv had a marsh 6 pop treatment plant turn up in the yard pumped outlet £2900 ex Vat, There be a few hundred for fittings but even so £6k to put a machine in for the day and a load of lean mix seams plenty on the labour front....
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