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Cancelled holiday cottage - 5 hours notice!

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Consumer Rights
18 replies 2.3K views
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  • the_lunatic_is_in_my_headthe_lunatic_is_in_my_head Forumite
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    edeca wrote: »
    However, I am interested in what compensation should be expected (even as goodwill) because it's incredibly one sided that the landlord can cancel with 5 hours notice with no penalty.

    As Aylesbury said earlier you are relying on good will, either an old fashioned letter or complain on their Facebook page (although if it is the company I think it is their Facebook isn't up to much and they may just delete it and possibly become annoyed).

    Best they are likely to offer is a reduced rate for a future booking.

    Anyone know if the letting agent can place the contract with the property owner rather than themselves? Seems a bit one-sided seeing as the OP has no details nor has made any contact with the owner directly.
  • unholyangelunholyangel Forumite
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    edeca wrote: »
    However, I am interested in what compensation should be expected (even as goodwill) because it's incredibly one sided that the landlord can cancel with 5 hours notice with no penalty.

    Loss of enjoyment/distress/inconvenience is rarely entertained in breach of contract cases.....except for certain circumstances where the purpose of the contract is to provide peace of mind, relaxation etc....such as holidays.

    However, first you do need to try and mitigate your losses. And also keep your expectations of any potential figure realistic. While it can be claimed for such instances, it tends to reflect the circumstances - ie a holiday you take regularly versus a once in a lifetime trip/honeymoon.

    Also, it would depend whether it was in the owners control or not. Scheduled building work or lack of maintenance versus emergency repairs through storm damage for example.
    Anyone know if the letting agent can place the contract with the property owner rather than themselves? Seems a bit one-sided seeing as the OP has no details nor has made any contact with the owner directly.

    Clue is in the name: agent. An agent is someone who can act on behalf of someone, and enter them into contracts.

    The letting agency should provide the owners details.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
  • J_BJ_B Forumite
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    Clue is in the name: agent. An agent is someone who can act on behalf of someone, and enter them into contracts.

    The letting agency should provide the owners details.


    When our clients have booked, the agent gives them our contact details

    Do you not have these details?
  • fred246fred246 Forumite
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    Years ago we rented a cottage. We were excited because it was so new that they had to provide an artist's impression. We got a call the day before to cancel it. We rented another one and decided to have a look at the one we missed out on. They'd only just started building it. No way was it even nearing completion. Very infuriating however buried in the terms & conditions there is always a get out clause for the letting company. The difference now is social media. Nowadays I'd be plastering my experiences over as many websites as I could.
  • steampoweredsteampowered Forumite
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    Gosh, that is really awful. I feel very sorry for you.

    The best thing might be to see if you can arrange an alternative at short notice and pick this up when you get back.

    It sounds to me like you a legal claim against the owner of the property - which would encompass both your financial losses (e.g. if you have to pay more for a similar property at short notice) and loss of enjoyment (i.e. a small sum for the inconvenience caused).

    Loss of enjoyment can be claimed in this case because this was a contract for a holiday.
  • unholyangelunholyangel Forumite
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    fred246 wrote: »
    Years ago we rented a cottage. We were excited because it was so new that they had to provide an artist's impression. We got a call the day before to cancel it. We rented another one and decided to have a look at the one we missed out on. They'd only just started building it. No way was it even nearing completion. Very infuriating however buried in the terms & conditions there is always a get out clause for the letting company. The difference now is social media. Nowadays I'd be plastering my experiences over as many websites as I could.

    Just because something is in the T&C's, doesn't mean its enforceable.

    This is why consumer rights exist - because there have always been shady companies. Even with rights set out in law, some companies still try their luck.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
  • happyandcontentedhappyandcontented Forumite
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    Name and shame. It is awful to do this at such short notice, and in Half Term week. They must have known earlier that the work would overrun.
  • pinkshoespinkshoes Forumite
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    edeca wrote: »

    With regard to finding an alternative - it's a school holiday week with a bank holiday. Alternatives are not easy to find (needs to be dog friendly, suitable for a 1 year old etc.), or are extremely expensive. We do have an insurance policy and Section 75 protection from the credit card. Therefore obtaining the booking money back should be fine.

    A quick look on holiday lettings shows many properties still available this week, suitable for kids and dogs...

    I would book one, enjoy your holiday, then chase the original company for a full refund and to cover the cost if the alternative cost more.

    As a teacher, I can ONLY have school holidays, so would have done the above.
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
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