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Rules on wording on charity bags

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Rules on wording on charity bags

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Charities
7 replies 4.8K views
MothballsWalletMothballsWallet Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Charities
Hi everyone, I thought I'd ask this question here because of the fountain of knowledge available rather than just rely on teh Google.

Last week, a charity bag was popped through my door while I was at work by their collection company. I read the wording on the bag related to the donation amount given by the company to the charity, it is stated as an actual monetary amount rather than a percentage.

Now, my limited understanding of the rules on this (as I don't work in the charity sector) is that they have to put it as a percentage and not an actual amount: is this correct?

I've put links to images of the bag's front and back I've hosted Postimage.org (I've got a free account on there, so they shouldn't disappear after 30 days):

Front of bag:

1-LMR-UK-Front.jpg

Back of bag:

2-LMR-UK-Back.jpg

You can click on the thumbnails to see the full size image.

Just to reiterate, the bag states at the bottom of the second image that the company "guarantees a donation of at least £50,000 each year" to the charity.

I've emailed both the charity and the company to ask them to stop putting these bags through my door and queried how they've worded it: strangely, the automated acknowledgement emails from both are almost identical in how they are worded.

The standard of English used in the text on the bag also makes me a little suspicious that it hasn't been proofread properly before committing to the print runs.

:think:

Any ideas?
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Replies

  • unforeseenunforeseen Forumite
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    I've no idea because I use every bag that comes through my door as a rubbish bag. If they ignore the 'no charity bags' on my door then tough.

    All my stuff is dealt with on trips to the supermarket as they have the skips there.
  • Savvy_SueSavvy_Sue Forumite
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    Last week, a charity bag was popped through my door while I was at work by their collection company. I read the wording on the bag related to the donation amount given by the company to the charity, it is stated as an actual monetary amount rather than a percentage.

    Now, my limited understanding of the rules on this (as I don't work in the charity sector) is that they have to put it as a percentage and not an actual amount: is this correct?
    I'm not aware of such a rule, although it's not an area in which I have any expertise. I did have a quick look at the FRSB website without spotting anything.

    The key thing in this case is that the charity mentioned on the bag appears to be legitimate, and has a link indicating that this company issues collection bags on their behalf.
    Still knitting!
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  • I'm not aware of it. Limited companies are profit making companies with shareholders so under no obligation to donate any profits to charity. They are simply telling you they happen to be making a corporate donation.

    If you want to give your money or belongings to private companies , that happen to donate to charities, you cannot claim gift aid , and some of it will go to the shareholders, so I would suggest give directly to the charity instead.
    "It is not the critic who counts..." - Theodore Roosevelt
  • davenport151davenport151 Forumite
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    As before,The only way you can guarantee all your clothing goes to the charities is to take them directly into the shops.
    One or two genuine charities (Red Cross, BHF and the salvation army) still use this collection method.

    I also don't like the fact that companies can use these bags. We get far too many of these through the door.
    Back on the trains again!



  • LadyDeeLadyDee Forumite
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    Problem with these bags is that they are often collected by thieves before the genuine collectors, or the charity does actually pick them up at all.
  • Half the time, these charity bags are for bogus/obscure charities. I use them as bin liners.
  • Blackbeard_of_PerranporthBlackbeard_of_Perranporth Forumite
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    Free Bin Liner!
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