Urgently need advice. Considering suicide :(

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  • maxmycardagainmaxmycardagain Forumite
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    ThisSucks wrote: »
    It is a letter from a process server saying that he has tried to deliver a Statutory Demand and failed and that he's coming back on such and such a date

    be out :rotfl::rotfl:
    Dont worry, be happy
  • Hi all, just an update. The process server is due to serve the Statutory Demand next week. He's said that if I'm not in the company pursuing me will just enter my building and drop it in my letter box.

    Anyway, I've reached out to the property company and to the property company's solicitors with offers to enter into a repayment plan immediately, and explaining my situation, that I have no assets etc. They just completely ignore me.

    StepChange have accepted me for a Debt Management Plan which they can have up and running early February.

    As part of re-building my life I've been accepted to return to university part-time to qualify as a solicitor. I'm pretty sure that being made bankrupt will put an end to that. So sad.

    It seems the property company are determined to bankrupt me. StepChange said in total it will cost the property company around £4000 to make me bankrupt and having assessed my income and expenditure StepChange say at present I only have £10 per month disposable cash left. So, at most, that is all the property company would get off me if they bankrupt me and then after 12 months I'd be discharged.

    Very weird. It would actually serve me financially to just let them do it. But it would also completely ruin my future career and I'd have to let go of my place at university.
  • Willing2LearnWilling2Learn Forumite
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    When you are at university, you can use Student Support Services to access mental health support and counselling to help make university a relatively stress-free, enjoyable and enriching environment for you. :)
    I work within the voluntary sector, supporting vulnerable people to rebuild their lives.

    I love my job

    :smiley:
  • Not sure you understood my last post. I am going back to university to obtain a law qualification and train as a solicitor. If I am made bankrupt I am not permitted to work as a solicitor and thus there's no point going to university.

    I already have access to therapy and other psychiatric support.
    When you are at university, you can use Student Support Services to access mental health support and counselling to help make university a relatively stress-free, enjoyable and enriching environment for you. :)
  • Willing2LearnWilling2Learn Forumite
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    A Law degree is so much more than just a pathway to being a solicitor. Having a law degree would open so many doors for you, that the possibilities could be quite overwhelming. A law degree is a stepping stone to a wide variety of career options

    The glass is always half full :)
    I work within the voluntary sector, supporting vulnerable people to rebuild their lives.

    I love my job

    :smiley:
  • I already have a PPE degree (Philosophy, Politics & Economics) I wouldn't be returning to university for a law degree, but rather to do a conversion course that would allow me to use the degree I already have to go on to train as a solicitor.

    Like I said, it looks like bankruptcy would prevent me from being able to work in that profession. I'm not really understanding your replies to be honest.
    A Law degree is so much more than just a pathway to being a solicitor. Having a law degree would open so many doors for you, that the possibilities could be quite overwhelming. A law degree is a stepping stone to a wide variety of career options

    The glass is always half full :)
  • ThisSucks wrote: »
    Very weird. It would actually serve me financially to just let them do it. But it would also completely ruin my future career and I'd have to let go of my place at university.
    There are at least a couple of reasons why they would press ahead.

    One is that many people who claim to have no assets or slack in their SOA actually do have a bit (as shown by many of the SOAs posted on the site) and so when presented with bankruptcy manage to find enough for a repayment plan.

    The other reason is that no-one would believe that the threat was real if they backed off at the eleventh hour.

    It’s not personal, or vindictive, it’s their last-ditch attempt to recover what they are owed so yes, if you cannot pay then I’m afraid that the law career and several others may be off the cards.
  • fatbellyfatbelly Forumite
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    ThisSucks wrote: »
    It seems the property company are determined to bankrupt me. StepChange said in total it will cost the property company around £4000 to make me bankrupt and having assessed my income and expenditure StepChange say at present I only have £10 per month disposable cash left. So, at most, that is all the property company would get off me if they bankrupt me and then after 12 months I'd be discharged.

    Income Payment Orders have a minimum of £20 per month so they would get nothing.
  • The Citizens Advice Bureau and Step Change seem to have a very different opinion from yours. They've pointed out that the property company will simply want to recoup as much of the money that's owed as possible. Making me bankrupt would cost them around £4,000 all in, including their legal fees. While technically I would be liable for some of those costs myself, I simply do not have any assets or disposable income. They've said no lawyer worth their salt would advise the property company to go ahead with bankruptcy unless they were 100% sure I owned significant assets or had a job where some of the salary could be taken.
    Since neither of these situations apply to me, the property company would be taking themselves from a situation where they are £7000 out of pocket, to a situation where they are £11,000 + out of pocket.
    Also, given that I actually used to live in a property owned by them, they were fully aware of my declining health and personal situation. I lived there for quite a while and was always a good payer with no issues at all, until my circumstances took such a change for the worst.
    Common sense should show that I'm not just an !!!!!!! who felt like living rent-free.
    There are at least a couple of reasons why they would press ahead.

    One is that many people who claim to have no assets or slack in their SOA actually do have a bit (as shown by many of the SOAs posted on the site) and so when presented with bankruptcy manage to find enough for a repayment plan.

    The other reason is that no-one would believe that the threat was real if they backed off at the eleventh hour.

    It’s not personal, or vindictive, it’s their last-ditch attempt to recover what they are owed so yes, if you cannot pay then I’m afraid that the law career and several others may be off the cards.
  • So it's difficult to see how the property company would benefit from this at all then?
    They are extremely unpleasant people but even so, I'm not sure they'd choose bankruptcy just out of pure spite. They must imagine this benefits them in some way?
    fatbelly wrote: »
    Income Payment Orders have a minimum of £20 per month so they would get nothing.
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