Forum Home» Budgeting & Bank Accounts

Complaint for Visa and Halifax

New Post Advanced Search

Complaint for Visa and Halifax

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Budgeting & Bank Accounts
42 replies 4.5K views
HappyUserHappyUser Forumite
301 posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Budgeting & Bank Accounts
Hello!


I have made a couple of transactions with some dodgy merchants. While legitimate companies are happy to refund you if you are not happy, these will do whatever it takes so that you don't get a refund, even though their products/services are crap.


Halifax particularly has been extremely unhelpful when pursuing a refund on your debit card. You are pretty much left alone and they often blame Visa's terms and conditions.


In contrast, Paypal or Amazon (not Ebay), have been extremely supportive to unhappy customers.


Is there a bank and debit card that can offer a service on par with Paypal in terms of refunds?


I am far from a scammer consumer who rips off businesses, but at the same time, I don't want to feel like an idiot for paying and receiving crap, with no chance of refund.


Thanks!
«1345

Replies

  • masonicmasonic Forumite
    14K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Photogenic Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Why not use a credit card?
  • HappyUserHappyUser Forumite
    301 posts
    masonic wrote: »
    Why not use a credit card?


    The problem is that some times there is a fee to use credit cards or they are not accepted at all!
  • masonicmasonic Forumite
    14K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Photogenic Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    HappyUser wrote: »
    The problem is that some times there is a fee to use credit cards or they are not accepted at all!
    All fees for using credit cards are now banned. Any merchant charging them runs the risk of having them reclaimed at a later date by the customer. I've never encountered an online business that refuses credit cards AND options like paypal (funded by a credit card).
  • blufferbluffer Forumite
    516 posts
    Tenth Anniversary 500 Posts
    ✭✭
    you make a transaction with a dodgy merchant and want the bank to bail you out? why should they?


    its not fraud, you made the decision to make the transaction. if you have raised a dispute, the bank are only a middleman and they have to follow rules as well. if the company says the transaction is correct and the debit should stand the bank have done all they can. its then a civil case between you and the company.


    paypal/ebay better than banks? not by my experience and why i gave up ebay.
    2020 wins - £0.10 from the TCB Hummingbird
  • Terry_TowellingTerry_Towelling Forumite
    2.3K posts
    1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    The argument that credit/debit card providers should help get you a refund following contractual issues is a moot point. It can be argued that they are only a payment method (like cash) and they should not get involved in contractual issues between buyer and seller. Certainly businesses might take a lot of convincing to accept cards if they thought they could be charged back willy-nilly on a Cardholder's say so.

    There is of course nothing to stop the card issuers accepting what you say and paying you out - except that they'd probably have to write-off the debt themselves - which they won't want to do.

    Ignoring S75 of the CCA for the time being, the card companies do have sets of rules that can allow them to transfer debts back to the sellers bankers in certain well-defined situations. UK Visa and MasterCard branded products have slightly different rules to each other but they are broadly similar - and it doesn't (usually) matter whether they are on debit or credit cards. Overseas rules vary slightly.

    One thing the rules will require before allowing a bank to exercise a 'consumer-protection' type Chargeback is evidence of the claim and evidence that you have tried to resolve the matter with the seller - which may include you returning the goods to the seller first. The sorts of situation where they may be prepared to help you might be where goods haven't arrived, or are not as described or are defective in some way. Remember, though the seller does have the 'right to reply' and the debt may come winging its way back to you.

    Using a credit card can potentially add another layer of protection from S75 of the CCA.

    The way you describe your situation is that the goods received are substandard in some way which, on the face of it, isn't something that your card issuer could legitimately recover from the seller's bankers. You do, of course have recourse to the law to attempt recovery but that is onerous, potentially expensive and may not get you anywhere either.

    Certainly if you are charged a fee for card usage you should complain to your card issuer who will refer the matter to the sellers bank for dealing.

    Sorry I couldn't give you anything more encouraging.
  • FlobberchopsFlobberchops Forumite
    1.3K posts
    ✭✭✭
    If you've made a purchase and not received the goods/services paid for, then you're entitled to a refund. Usually the vendor is the first port of call to go about resolving the issue, but if they can't or won't help then your bank should log a payment dispute on your behalf.
    I work for a UK bank, but any comments made on this forum are solely my personal opinion. Caveat Emptor!
  • HappyUserHappyUser Forumite
    301 posts
    If you've made a purchase and not received the goods/services paid for, then you're entitled to a refund. Usually the vendor is the first port of call to go about resolving the issue, but if they can't or won't help then your bank should log a payment dispute on your behalf.


    I know, but Halifax blame Visa that they cannot do anything. If you have a problem with a seller via Paypal, you file a dispute and they value customers than dodgy sellers.
  • ArmoricaArmorica Forumite
    764 posts
    I'm not sure you're comparing similar services.

    Paypal provide additional protection.

    If you want protection against 'dodgy' then you need to use a credit card not a debit card with a bank.

    The Visa rules define situations when chargebacks can and can't be made. And your circumstances may not meet them.

    Do you need to re-think which merchants you deal with in the first place?
  • HappyUserHappyUser Forumite
    301 posts
    Can I use a credit card to completely replace my debit card?
    Ie, I can use it at the takeaway, tube, online, etc?
  • ArmoricaArmorica Forumite
    764 posts
    HappyUser wrote: »
    Can I use a credit card to completely replace my debit card?
    Ie, I can use it at the takeaway, tube, online, etc?

    Pretty much yes?

    There are some (minor) differences and acceptances and fees that don't really matter for day to day use.

    It's better practice to have more than one card - say a visa debit with one bank and a mastercard credit with another. So if one network goes down, you would still be ok.

    Most people would tend to use credit cards only for larger purchases or online where they'd like the extra protection. Unless you're very well trained at paying it off each month.

    Although plenty of takeaways will still only take cash...
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support