Can he claim for dental treatment

2

Replies

  • maggiesoup1maggiesoup1 Forumite
    186 Posts
    paragon909 wrote: »
    lol.... When I posted this I had a strong feeling that you would end up being from Scotland... I guess it's similar rules to English NHS.

    Hey! Are you presuming the Scots are mean ;) but then I see you're from here too.

    Of course, it could all be different if President Nicola gets in!
  • Bananas123Bananas123 Forumite
    311 Posts
    hello,

    i think he is going to have to get a hc1 form, and then apply for a hc2 (help with health costs) (free if low income)

    you can apply for backdatd reimbursement, but i don't know deadlines for doing so, also it takes a little while to recieve / process.

    http://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/HealthCosts/1128.aspx

    near the bottom > "scotland you can download"

    or
    ou can also get an HC1 at community pharmacies, GP practices, Citizens Advice Scotland offices and Job Centre Plus offices
  • paragon909paragon909 Forumite
    1.5K Posts
    Hey! Are you presuming the Scots are mean ;) but then I see you're from here too.

    Of course, it could all be different if President Nicola gets in!

    No partly the name maggie :P Sounds Scottish...
  • I don't want him to "sign on" as I can afford to feed and cloth him and more importantly don't want him to get into the habit of getting money without working for it as he is now applying for jobs but may take some time to get one. A friend mentioned that if he signs on he'll get his National Insurance stamp paid for. Not sure what that's all about as I've been PAYE all my life. Can anyone explain this please and is it important to get his stamps bought asap. If so should I buy them?
  • edited 13 September 2016 at 12:13PM
    missbiggles1missbiggles1
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    edited 13 September 2016 at 12:13PM
    I don't want him to "sign on" as I can afford to feed and cloth him and more importantly don't want him to get into the habit of getting money without working for it as he is now applying for jobs but may take some time to get one. A friend mentioned that if he signs on he'll get his National Insurance stamp paid for. Not sure what that's all about as I've been PAYE all my life. Can anyone explain this please and is it important to get his stamps bought asap. If so should I buy them?

    If he's claiming JSA he'll be credited with his NI for the period he's claiming.

    I don't really see the difference (for him) of claiming JSA and using it to pay for his keep and for you to be keeping him for free - in neither case is he working or being independent.

    I'd get him to sign on, pay for his keep and and get his NI credited - he'll get far more pressure from the Jobcentre to find a job than I imagine you're applying to him.

    At the moment it must be just the same as being a kid again with mum paying everything for him.
  • JamiesmumJamiesmum Forumite
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    Shouldn't signing on be his choice? Not yours?

    It lets him starting learning to manage money ASAP. Why should he have to ask his mum for money if he wants a lunch and a drink or a new top?

    Plus, the jobcenter will actually help him find a job as I do believe they're much stricter these days, so it'll probably get him out and earning much sooner, too.
  • I agree with the posters aswell OP. With regards to dental/optical/prescriptions it would be easier if your son was signing on as JSA would automatically give him discounted/free treatment.

    If you are paying for your son so that he doesn't get a "free ride" unfortunately that's what you are doing. His JSA (presuming under 25) would only be £57.90 per week and the jobcentre would make him do a certain amount of jobseeking for that.

    Then he would out of that have to pay his keep to you for his electric/gas/food/travel etc and I believe this would actually teach him a bigger lesson in how much things actually cost and that he needs to get a job.

    (your "draw down" comment makes me think that you may be of the idea that if he signs on now he'll have less of an entitlement to it later? That there'll be less in his pot as it were. That's not the case if that's what your worry is btw )
    Total Debt:
    Dec 2015: £20,090.87
    Dec 2016: £16,320.85
  • Sorry Miss Biggles1 I totally disagree, I think there are enough financial pressures on the benefit system and if I can afford to feed him then I don't want him to take money out of the pot which should be going to the more deserving.

    I do agree with the poster who said if he signed on then the Job Centre would put more pressure on than me, and he may have to consider doing that in the future, but I'm happy that he doesn't have to go along cap in hand for the time being.
  • missbiggles1missbiggles1
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    Sorry Miss Biggles1 I totally disagree, I think there are enough financial pressures on the benefit system and if I can afford to feed him then I don't want him to take money out of the pot which should be going to the more deserving.

    I do agree with the poster who said if he signed on then the Job Centre would put more pressure on than me, and he may have to consider doing that in the future, but I'm happy that he doesn't have to go along cap in hand for the time being.

    Well, I was the poster who said both, actually.

    Unfortunately, any pressure you're putting on him doesn't seem to have worked in the 6 months or more that he's been looking so I really think he needs to face the real world rather than being infantilised by being handed his keep and pocket money by his mum.

    ETA
    He could give his JSA to charity if you feel that strongly about it - that'd give him his NI credits and a more realistic push towards employment.
  • xylophonexylophone Forumite
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    Signing on could help him focus on finding a job.

    If he gave you the JSA, assuming you are a tax payer, you could donate the money to charity and the charity could claim the tax relief.

    In that way, the "more deserving" would benefit even more.
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