Family trees

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  • monnagranmonnagran Forumite
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    No hints or tips alas but I will say, "Dont place any reliance on information from tombstones."

    My father -in-law was in SOE during the war as was his second wife. Secrecy and misleading people was the rule which they never quite got over. When FIL died in France in 1990 his widow took me to see his grave. There, on the splendid black marble tombstone, engraved in gold letters was the most spectacular litany of lies it has ever been my privilege to clap eyes on. I was stunned into silence, (a rare occurrence.)
    Finally I asked her if she had chosen the words. Yes, she had, but she added thoughtfully, "Of course I know he was older than he said he was." Long silence. Then she said very quietly, "But then so am I."

    WARNING. THIS IS NOTHING AT ALL TO DO WITH ANCESTRY.

    A story for Sailor Sam.

    Have you heard this one?

    An neighbour calls on an elderly neighbour and finds her in a state of some distress. "I don't know what to do," she cries. "I'm trying to do this jigsaw. There are so many pieces and the picture shows that it is supposed to be a cockeril but I can't make any sense of it at all. I haven't even got started."
    The neighbour examined the pieces, patted her on the back and said, "Don't you worry. I'll go and make us both a nice cup of tea. When we've drunk that I'll help you put the cornflakes back in the box."

    x
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
  • edited 30 July 2016 at 9:49AM
    PasturesNewPasturesNew Forumite
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    edited 30 July 2016 at 9:49AM
    In my tree my GGG-grandmother started with an illegitimate son. Let's call him Bob Smith. She then married and Bob Smith started calling himself Bob Brown (in line with all the other children's surnames).

    When he married he used his proper name - as it was in his local church. Bob Smith married (let's say) Mary Bobbins.

    I then found that he and his wife had gone their separate ways as I later found Bob marrying 150 miles away in a double marriage with his half-brother, married using the (adopted/fake) name Bob Brown. I tracked this down because a newspaper covered a story in the 1940s of his (half) brother on their 50th wedding anniversary - and that wife said "two brothers married two sisters", which confused me.... so I had to find out who this other brother was and worked out it was the half-brother using his mother's married name so both brothers were using the same surname!

    Meanwhile, back at his wife, Mary Bobbins/Smith, I found she'd remarried, using her maiden name of Bobbins.

    So both were bigamists!

    (All names made up to illustrate the events).

    I also found my natural grandfather's wife, who was not granted a separation for cruelty, had bagged herself a "posh kn0b" and married well - bigamously. When her husband tired of her he got a private detective to look into her previous marriage and discovered she'd never divorced. That was in the papers as a bigamy - the reporting of which gave me some great information on my grandfather.... she'd really "married well beneath herself" when she married my grandfather during WW1 and just a couple of months after her father had died. Post-war she realised she was poor and married to scum, so left. "Her type" was more like her 2nd husband, a dashing RAF hero pilot who was at the top of his game and came from "a posh family".
  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
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    So both were bigamists!

    It's not surprising that this happened more often in the past than now. Divorce just wasn't an option for most of the population.
  • GrumpelstiltskinGrumpelstiltskin Forumite
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    As well as divorce being only available to the mega rich in the 19th century people were never asked for any proof of name, age , marital status etc. when they married.


    Today we are used to having to produce evidence of identity for many things this just wasn't done until relatively recently.


    BTW There are early 20th century English divorce records at the National Archives http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/


    You do have to pay for the gory details but you can see the index free online.
    If you go down to the woods today you better not go alone.
  • Hi everyone, goodness a second page already!
    Loving the stories. Sam you can distract at anytime, love your wit x
    I received an email from the National Archives yesterday, stating that criminal records from 1986 -1988 have been released. So they are now history? Oh I am feeling old.
    I love museums. Most woman like to go shopping in a new town, not me.
    I like to get a feel of what it was like for all my ancestors. So it is not just a case of tracing them all for me. I dropped history at school, so now I have to learn it all. I don't know why, but the Victorian era is my favourite.
    My Nan, grew up in Whitechapel. She told me stories about Jack the Ripper. So, sometimes my getting a feeling for back then, is rather creepy.
    Tips x
  • PasturesNewPasturesNew Forumite
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    I love museums.

    Look into the Red House Museum in Christchurch. Free entry, although it's small. It used to be the workhouse. There's some 'event' I think later in the year that might be more interesting than the regular offerings.

    https://www.facebook.com/Rhm1764/
    http://www.hampshireculturaltrust.org.uk/red-house-museum-and-gardens

    Having said look into it - I've been round .... 30 minutes maximum and you're done :)

    I visited your local LDS place once.... bit of a shambles. I could show them on my screen where the record set I wanted said it was available, but they couldn't tell me how/where it was available, they were clueless as to how to actually GET records into their office. Keen and lovely, but utterly clueless they were.
  • GrumpelstiltskinGrumpelstiltskin Forumite
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    Pastures New You have to order and pay for LDS records online now and you are notified when they are available. It's also much more expensive than it used to be.
    If you go down to the woods today you better not go alone.
  • PasturesNew I have been to Red House on many occasions. I like Poole museum also.
    Christchurch has so much history, even a witches ducking stool!
    Back later
    Tips
  • PasturesNewPasturesNew Forumite
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    Pastures New You have to order and pay for LDS records online now and you are notified when they are available. It's also much more expensive than it used to be.

    The point is, though, I did a 40 mile round trip to go to their office .... and I found the record and was prepared to pay money .... but they had NO idea how to get the records.

    They didn't understand, on their own system, where the records were and how to get them.

    I think it was images of an original Parish Register that their system says they possess.

    I was sitting in their office, with two of their volunteers, with the correct screen open - and I was pointing at the location, which indicated the records were available ... and I said "I want that" .... and they had no idea.
  • PasturesNewPasturesNew Forumite
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    PasturesNew I have been to Red House on many occasions. I like Poole museum also.
    Christchurch has so much history, even a witches ducking stool!
    Back later
    Tips

    Do not be fooled by the ducking stool.

    It's a reproduction placed "close to where the original might've been".

    It's not THE stool, nor in THE location.

    2 minutes tops for that :) and most of that time wondering where to wander to next.

    I like the "buried twice" gravestone in the Priory churchyard. Interesting bit of history there.
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