Green, ethical, energy issues in the news

edited 12 July 2021 at 11:38AM in Green & Ethical MoneySaving
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  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    UK's coal plants 'to be phased out within 10 years'

    Slightly controversial, not the closing of coal, but the plans to replace with gas and nuclear. Gas because it's CO2 ouput is still too high to meet future targets, and nuclear because renewable costs are now starting to undercut it.

    But, for predictable, rampable generation gas is certainly an improvement on coal. Looking at Gridwatch yesterday, coal generation seems exceptionally low for this time of year, presumably down to the large number of closures this year, and wind has been high for nearly a week.

    Mart.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    Global emissions nearly stall after a decade of rapid growth, report shows

    Ok, we're not fixing the problem, but we may be close to the point that we stop making it even worse (the supertanker has turned 90d perhaps) ....... good news, I think.

    Mart.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • EricMearsEricMears Forumite
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    Martyn1981 wrote: »
    Ok, we're not fixing the problem, but we may be close to the point that we stop making it even worse (the supertanker has turned 90d perhaps) ....... good news, I think.

    Mart.
    If a supertanker were to turn 90deg suddenly, it would almost certainly roll over and sink ! :D
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  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    EricMears wrote: »
    If a supertanker were to turn 90deg suddenly, it would almost certainly roll over and sink ! :D

    That's one way to stop it! Though I have my doubts about it being green & ethical. ;)

    Doh! Thinking about it, CO2 emissions not going up, isn't the same as a 90d turn, as the amount being emitted is still too large, so, sadly, the tanker is still heading in the wrong direction, it's simply stopped accelerating. :(

    Mart.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • edited 5 December 2015 at 8:29AM
    Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    edited 5 December 2015 at 8:29AM
    Stanford University have produced a report outlining an economical shift to 100% renewable energy by 2050:-

    The world could be 100% renewable by 2050
    Researchers from Stanford University have layed out exactly how the planet could forego fossil fuel and nuclear power and adopt renewable energy across the board.

    A new study by Stanford University’s Atmosphere/Energy Program makes the case that the world could be fully powered by renewable energy as early as 2050 by detailing the necessary resources for each country.
    Speaking to innovation news website Co.Exist, Atmosphere/Energy Program director Mark Z. Jacobson said, "These are basically plans showing it's technically and economically feasible to change the energy infrastructure of all of these different countries."

    Jacobson rejected claims that adopting renewable energy to such a wide extent would be too expensive and unreliable. “What this shows is that all these claims are mythical."


    But here's the fun bit, they have produced a very easy to use tool that shows the suggested mix for each country. Just hover over a country to see the mix:-

    100% RENEWABLE ENERGY

    Spoiler alert!

    For the UK it suggests 85% wind and 10% PV.
    Ireland is similar about 83% wind and 12% PV.
    Germany 35% wind and 62% PV (seriously?)
    Spain has a broad mix, 53% solar (PV and CSP), 36% wind, 12% hydro.
    Canada broad mix, 58% wind, 21% PV and 16% hydro.
    US 48% wind and 47% solar.
    Australia 36% wind and 53% solar.
    China is quite dramatic with 64% solar and 29% wind.
    India takes it even further with 77% solar and 20% wind.
    African countries vary a lot, but high solar, even 90% in the Congo.

    Have fun.

    Mart.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • SterlingtimesSterlingtimes Forumite
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    Martyn1981 wrote: »

    100% RENEWABLE ENERGY

    Spoiler alert!

    For the UK it suggests 85% wind and 10% PV.
    Ireland is similar about 83% wind and 12% PV.
    Germany 35% wind and 62% PV (seriously?)
    Spain has a broad mix, 53% solar (PV and CSP), 36% wind, 12% hydro.
    US broad mix, 58% wind, 21% PV and 16% hydro.
    Australia 36% wind and 53% solar.
    China is quite dramatic with 64% solar and 29% wind.
    India takes it even further with 77% solar and 20% wind.
    African countries vary a lot, but high solar, even 90% in the Congo.

    Have fun.

    Mart.

    The countries with more sun appear to use more PV.
    Solar installed 21 November 2014 > Centre of England > 3,780 Wp > 14 *270 Watt Trina panels > 14 * Enphase micro-inverters > managed by Enlighten Envoy Hub > 19° west of south > 35° pitch > tree shading to east > iBoost > Wattson Anywhere monitoring > Schneider Electric (Drayton) MiGenie smart thermostat.
  • EricMearsEricMears Forumite
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    The countries with more sun appear to use more PV.
    I don't think those figures relate to what is happening now but to what they suggest ought to happen in the future. Of course suggesting large use of SP in sunny climes makes perfect sense.

    What I don't understand (and don't think Martyn did either) is why they're suggesting such a high %SP for Germany - which has a pretty similar climate to ours. It may seem like 'nit-picking' to highlight one single error but it does suggest a lack of care in preparing report.

    Arguably, the world has always used '100% renewable' energy since even the fossil fuels were derived from sunshine millions of years ago and are being 'renewed' (albeit much too slowly) all the time.
    NE Derbyshire.
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    BEV : Nissan Leaf e+
  • SterlingtimesSterlingtimes Forumite
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    I appreciated that this was a future projection.

    Solar is aligned in hotter climate to powering air conditioning during times of maximum generation. Here, in the UK, solar cannot substitute for winter central heating. Germany does buck the trend and that is probably because of the non-nuclear policy.

    For the UK, I can see the preference for nuclear working alongside a lower solar implementation. Germany would still have a problem with winter energy provision.
    Solar installed 21 November 2014 > Centre of England > 3,780 Wp > 14 *270 Watt Trina panels > 14 * Enphase micro-inverters > managed by Enlighten Envoy Hub > 19° west of south > 35° pitch > tree shading to east > iBoost > Wattson Anywhere monitoring > Schneider Electric (Drayton) MiGenie smart thermostat.
  • edited 28 November 2015 at 5:52PM
    Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    edited 28 November 2015 at 5:52PM
    EricMears wrote: »
    What I don't understand (and don't think Martyn did either) is why they're suggesting such a high %SP for Germany - which has a pretty similar climate to ours. It may seem like 'nit-picking' to highlight one single error but it does suggest a lack of care in preparing report.

    Hi Eric. Only my assumptions, but if the report is correct for Germany, not a typo, then perhaps this relates to the basis of the report which is to set out the most economic solution (not necessarily cheap in Germany's case).

    Looking at the report we see both countries have similar amounts of on-shore wind but the UK also gets a huge amount of off-shore wind, but Germany doesn't have as much available to it, so perhaps that leads to a higher PV rollout if the only option is 100% renewable.

    The [STRIKE]million[/STRIKE] [STRIKE]billion[/STRIKE] trillion dollar question though is storage, how much? In Germany's case this could even mean some sort of inter-seasonal storage, at which point this vastly more expensive.

    [Edit: Quick read of the report and I think it's using hydrogen production as the form of storage. M.]

    Mart.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    International Energy Agency sees 'peak coal' as demand for fossil fuel crumbles in China
    'The golden age of coal seems to be over. Given the dramatic fall in the cost of solar and wind, the question is whether coal prices will ever recover'
    The shift is dramatic. China’s coal demand has tripled since 2000 to 3.920m tonnes - half of global consumption - and the big mining companies had assumed that it would continue. The market is now badly out of kilter. Rising demand from India under its electrification drive will not be enough to soak up excess supply or replace the lost demand from China.

    The share of global power from coal will drop from 41pc today to 37pc by 2020 before going into relentless decline.
    While India has ambitious plans to extend power to 240m people without electricity, it is also betting heavily on low-carbon technology, aiming to install 175 gigawatts (GW) of solar, wind and other renewables by 2022.

    South Asia and parts of the developing world still want to build coal plants but they are finding it much harder to obtain funding.

    The World Bank and the big multilateral development agencies will not finance or guarantee new coal plants, or will only do so under stringent conditions. The Norwegian pension fund – the world’s biggest wealth fund – is divesting from coal. So is the Church of England. Private banks are becoming wary of the sector, given the tail-risk of class-action “climate lawsuits”.

    China is cutting back for its own reasons, shutting down dirty home boilers to curb toxic levels of pollution in the big cities and to head off a middle class revolt.

    It has installed 284 GW of hydro power over the past five years, mostly in the mountains of Sichuan and Yunnan. Solar and wind farms pepper the plains of North China. The country installed a record 23 GW of wind turbines in 2014, as much as the rest of the world put together.

    Mart.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
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